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Features

  • In its production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” Los Alamos Little Theatre reached high and aimed big and the local theater company should be proud of the results.

    The cast and crew effectively wove drama, tragedy, laughter and hope into this production.

    “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” a play by Dale Wasserman, which is based on Ken Kesey’s novel, takes place in a mental hospital. When a new patient arrives at the institution, the established order and control in the hospital is questioned and challenged.

  • Impressionist paintings have certain characteristics that set them apart: open composition, visible brush strokes and an emphasis on light in its changing qualities. Finding a different type of art in northern New Mexico is sometimes a far stretch, given that culture often influences artists but Española artist Tony Trujillo knows what impressionism is. His paintings meld beautiful landscapes of azure, violet and emerald and leave the observer longing for a far-off world of tranquility.

  • Writers are a great breed of artists. Not only do they create something that can become immortal, but writers can inspire many other forms of art.

    When I attended the Colorado Press Association’s awards conference a few years ago in Denver, I remember one of the speakers who mentioned Mark Bowden. Bowden wrote a newspaper article about soldiers who had gone to Somalia. Not only did his article lead to a book, but it also inspired a movie and, marvels upon marvels, a video game.

    This is just one example of the power the written word has on the art world.

  • David Gonzales has studied with some of the guitar greats.

    Now he shares his knowledge with the next generation of guitar musicians as an intern at Albuquerque Academy.  

    Gonzales is also taking his skills as a guitarist to the stage. Thursday, he will be the next performer in the Guitar and Gateaux concert series. The show kicks off with dessert at 7 p.m. followed by music at 7:30 p.m. at Fuller Lodge.

    The program for the concert will include music by Mauro Giuliani, Manuel Ponces, Manuel de Falla, Francis Pouleno and Albert Ruosel.

  • Los Alamos alumni always come back to show how they’ve turned out and this week, Aspen Elementary School graduate Richard C. Korzekwa will do just that.

    Korzekwa is here at the request of friend and fellow teacher Brittney Newman. With the help of the Bradbury Science Museum, he is visiting Aspen Elementary School, the Jemez Pueblo and Chamisa Elementary School in the Physics Van.

  •  “In its blindness, war destroys the lives of civilians and soldiers alike,” writes Jorg Jansen, author of “And New Life Blossoms from the Ruins.” Jansen will sign his memoir about his childhood growing up in World War II Germany, at 6 p.m. Thursday at Otowi Station Bookstore and Science Museum Shop. Before the signing, he will share  his childhood memories in a talk at 5 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

  • It is a 12-year-old script but the story never gets old.

    From 6:30-8:30 p.m. April 11, the Santa Fe Stake of the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church will present a timeless story in the form of a pageant titled, “Christ’s Passage to Resurrection” at the Los Alamos ward.

    Brent and Marcia Boyack of Los Alamos wrote the script, which is based on the King James’ version of the New Testament.

    “We wanted to provide a special Easter experience for members of our church,” Brent said.

  • Mental institutions do not seem to be popular locations for inspiring hope, especially not the one featured in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Medication, group therapy and alienation from the outside world are emphasized in the fictional institution. There is not much room for anything else so the patients become prisoners in a hopeless situation. That is, until a newcomer is admitted.

  • Today, we are quite excited to scratch our armpits and other body parts in front of Ed Bonelli, who is visiting from a different folder in the computer we live in when we’re not in the newspaper.

    Ed is a character in a new, unpublished play. He doesn’t do much in the play, other than occupy a living room, and as far as we can tell, he doesn’t do anything outside of it. However, we like his company, if only because we’re sick of each others’, and we like pestering him with questions.

    Monkeys: Ed, why don’t you tell us about the play?

  • One of the most intergenerational events happens Saturday with the annual Fabulous 50s’ Family Sock Hop from Los Alamos Family Council.

    The rooty toot toot, root beer floating, burger – and fries – benefit will aid the Family Council and the Youth Activity Center programs for the next year and benefit everyone from youth to seniors.

  • The Great Southwest Council of the Boy Scouts of America honored local resident Sandy Jennings with the council-level distinguish service award, the Silver Beaver, at the annual recognition event held Feb. 21 in Albuquerque.

    The Silver Beaver is the highest award that can be presented by a local council for noteworthy service of an exceptional character to youth within the council.

  • During the Los Alamos County Speech Contest, students needed to be quick with their words and smooth with their talk. The most skilled speakers proved to be Piñon Elementary School fifth-graders Derek Selvage and John Valdiviez.

    Selvege earned first place in the serious speech competition and Valdiviez earned first place in the humorous competition.

    The title of Selvege’s speech was, “Are you going to help me?” by Mark Hansen. Valdiviez presented a speech titled, “Librarian from the Black Lagoon,” by Mike Thaler.

  • There is something special about the Capitol Building in Santa Fe. As the saying goes, there is more to it than what meets the eye. The building is significant for more reasons than just its appearance; it is the only round capitol building in the U.S. It is what the building contains inside that makes it invaluable.

    Walking down corridors, climbing up stairs and entering offices, the evidence of the Capitol’s significance is everywhere. It is like viewing a collage, or spinning kaleidoscope of the art world in New Mexico.

  • The American Legion will observe its founding today.

    While the celebration will be simple, a few blue and gold balloons will hang from the local post’s marquee and a sign recognizing the legion turning 90 will be displayed, it will honor a very long and successful history of helping veterans and the community.

    Since its founding in 1919, more than 15,000 American Legion Posts have sprung up throughout the United States to serve veterans, their families and children in local communities.

  • The work of the Boy Scouts of America never ends and their fundraising efforts continue with their annual giving campaign, called Friends of Scouting.

    Paul Rhien, Northern New Mexico district executive, said many exciting things are happening in the district.

    “We are more and more able to expand our program and include more and more youth from the Española and Taos communities,“ he said.

  • The next performer to grace the stage at Duane Smith Auditorium in the Los Alamos Concert Association’s “Jewel of a Season” will be pianist Jie Chen. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. March 21. Chen will also present a master class on March 22.

  • When my sister and I were kids, we watched the movie, “The Sound of Music,” constantly. We loved it when Maria (Julie Andrews) sang about having confidence in herself and when the oldest Von Trapp daughter shares a dance and a kiss with her beau.

    Apparently, we were not the only fans of this musical.

    When the Monitor editorial staff found out that the Los Alamos Light Opera would perform the musical on the stage, a group of them, all men no less, broke out in an impressive rendition of “Do-Re-Mi.”

  • I am not a big fan of winter. The constant grey days, the daily sheet of ice on my car windshield and the cold that nips no matter how many layers of fleece or wool you wear are not appealing.

    I know I am not the only one who feels this way. Garrison Keillor, in his radio show, “A Prairie Home Companion,” has a whole story about the effect the winter blues have on people.

  • Karen Wray Fine Art, Studio and Gallery will celebrate its grand opening with an open house on Friday at 2101 Trinity Drive. The Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce will be on hand with giant scissors to help Wray cut the ribbon and the public is invited to attend from 4-6 p.m.

    “Everybody was saying ‘You should open a gallery,’” Wray said Wednesday. After developing her style and body of work for many years, the time was right for Wray to take their advice.

  • What is the value of play in young children’s lives?  Is play essential for developmental growth and school readiness? These are questions that are being asked as the pre-school years receive national attention from parents, educators and the government.