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Features

  • New Mexico Dance Theater to premier its latest original story ballet

    Step through the looking glass and enter a wonderland with “Alice”

    New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company (NMDT-PC), directed by Susan Baker-Dillingham, will present its newest creation, “Alice,” over the next two weekends at the Duane W. Smith Auditorium. The ballet will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday. A performance will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday and again at 2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 21.

  • In 1947, the Ranch School built an oval ice rink in Los Alamos Canyon. The boys created this smooth patch of ice by flooding and damming a tiny canyon creek. Little did they know that today more than 20,000 people visit their rink.

    The mad rush to the ice rink for this season will begin at 11:30 a.m. Friday.  

    The activities, which are co-sponsored by the Los Alamos Recreation Division and the Los Alamos Hockey Association, include a practice session for the local hockey team, the ATOMS from 5:15-6:15 p.m. Friday.

  • The First United Church of Los Alamos is taking stock of its year.

    While church members will evaluate their past deeds, they will also look ahead to the coming year and its potential.

    This annual review, known as the Charge Conference, will be held at noon Sunday in the Fellowship Hall.

    Everyone in the community  is welcomed to attend the conference.

  • When I was a kid, “Clue” was my favorite board game and “Murder, She Wrote,” was one of my favorite TV shows. I loved these two forms of entertainment because they offered intrigue, a sense of danger and the key players had to use their minds to solve the mystery.

    Therefore, I was delighted that Los Alamos Little Theater’s production of “Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure,” combines all these elements to produce one excellent play.

  • Sometimes, I try to write something. In fact, I do write something. I write line after line until I’ve got paragraphs. I spend several minutes, or even hours, before I realize my mistake, my monstrous mistake. It’s one I make repeatedly on blank screens and pieces of paper: I write a bunch of crap.

    This wouldn’t be such a problem if only people enjoyed reading crap. But they have much better things to do.

  • In recognition of National Young Readers Week, which began Monday, the staff of Los Alamos Public Schools is eager to host Family Literacy Night on Thursday at Chamisa Elementary School

    The schedule for the event will begin with the Scholastic Book Fair from 3:30-7 p.m.; a dinner hosted by the sixth-grade class will be held from 4-5 p.m.; the keynote speaker will take the stage at 4 p.m. and there will be storytelling for children from 5-5:45 p.m. Workshops will also be held from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

  • A pop tab is more than what it seems. It may look like a small, insignificant piece of metal but it can help make a difference in someone’s life.

    For instance, the VFW recently  donated the recycling proceeds to the American Veterans Cancer Fund.

    The fund received a hefty donation from Los Alamos High School freshman  Valerie Warthen, who donated 16 bags of pop tabs to VFW Post 8874.

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  • Christmas trees? Now that is a sweet holiday treat. Add in chocolate and the event becomes an extravaganza.

    Just such an event is being held starting Nov. 14 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The Chocolate Festival will be held at 7 p.m. In addition to sweet edible treats, the trees featured in the Festival of Trees, will be also unveiled. The trees will be displayed for a week, wrapping up with a special event from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 21 at the senior center.

  • Bilingual Montessori School relocated to its new building at 115 Longview Drive Oct. 1 and everyone  from the students to the teachers are noticing and appreciating the differences.

    The school, owner Odalys Fernandez said, needed a bigger space than its former 111 Longview Drive building. to accommodate its larger student population. The number of students grew from 37 to 50.

    These 50 students have plenty of space in the new building, which features five classrooms, a portal for 1-year-olds, a playground, kitchen and teacher’s lounge.

  • Classical music is more than just pretty sounds. For instance, between 1795-1880, a combination of an emotional and political atmosphere was commonly featured in the music. Hear this music during the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s fall concert to be presented at 7 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church. Michael Gyurik will conduct the concert.

  • When reading, images are conjured in a reader’s mind. They wonder, what does a character look like? What the appearance of a setting? With a new book by Anne Hillerman and Don Strel, these questions can be answered.

    Their book, “Tony Hillerman’s Landscape: On the Road with Leaphorn and Chee,” takes a visual tour of the settings featured in the mystery writer’s books.

  • On Friday, Los Alamos resident Jim Knudson will step into the spotlight as the soloist with the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra, playing the “Saint-Saens Cello Concerto.” Knudson is not inexperienced with the limelight. Being a soloist is only one of many hats this man wears.

  • Feelings account for a lot. In fact, according to the Search Institute, youth benefit from possessing Asset #33, Interpersonal Competence. The institute states, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they have empathy, sensitivity and friendship making skills.”

    This week, I have had the honor and pleasure of assisting the Russian delegation from our Sister City in Sarov, Russia, and attending the annual Search Institute Conference.

  • Thirty students made a commitment to leadership and to serve community.

    To cement this commitment, the Los Alamos Youth Leadership students are working on a variety of fundraising and service activities.  

    The teams are driven by the youth who coordinate everything from meetings and projects to team names and outcomes.

    Each team has its own unique name. For instance, there is the SPK team, or the Sour Patch Kids.

    This name was selected because sometimes the team members are sweet and sometimes they’re sour.

  • At first glance, it may seem like they are just the ones who drive the county transit buses, send out the utility bills or patrol the streets. On Saturday, however, the Los Alamos County employees are going to show a side of themselves not often seen in public.

    The Los Alamos County Employee Arts and Crafts Fair will be held from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. During this fair, 28 vendors, which will include county employees, their spouses and friends, will unleash their artistic side.

  • The first major construction project I participated in was building the fence around my family’s yard in Littleton, Colo.

    I was just a kid, but my father let me help him secure the support post before a construction company arrived to put up the actual fencing.

    I loved the whole experience; I loved watching the bead swish back and forth on the level, which was used to make sure the posts were straight.

    My father showed me how to use a hammer to nail in the posts and together we created a wooden grid of vertical and horizontal lines around the yard.

  • There’s no need to travel far to do holiday shopping. Just head down the street to the   Beta Sigma Phi Xi Nu chapter’s Fall Arts and Crafts Fair from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday at First Baptist Church.

    More than 30 vendors will be featured during the fair.

    For years, this fundraising event was located at the Pueblo Complex. The space at the Baptist Church is a large, open and well-lit space. Additionally it offers a kitchen.

    The products that will be for sale range from handmade cards and crafts to jerky and fabric items.

  • Art is more than a painting to hang on the wall or a song to listen to on the radio. It can be a tool to change someone’s life.

    A nonprofit organization based in New York, called Unified for Global Healing, puts this belief into practice. The organization, according to its Web site, has a network of physicians, nurses, social workers and artists who work together to provide a direct service, cross-cultural exchange and promote the advancement of global health.