.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • This week we take a look at Asset #32, planning and Asset #33, decision making. Earlier this week, I had a call from a parent who had me change my focus for this week.

    I would like to focus on kids who have poor decision-making skills or don’t plan and how we as adults relate to them.

    As adults, we need to help kids take responsibility for their actions, without going down one of two bad paths.

  • The live theatrical one-man drama, “Vianney,” performed by Leonardo Defilippis, will be presented at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Los Alamos.

    The Los Alamos performance will be the third stop in the New Mexico tour of this acclaimed production of the life of St. John Vianney. Other performances will take place at St. Anne’s Church in Santa Fe today, St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Rio Rancho Sunday,

  • If you have ever wondered what really goes on during a dance class or, for that matter, a performance rehearsal, you will soon have an opportunity to satisfy your curiosity. At 5 p.m. Thursday, Dance Arts Los Alamos will host an open rehearsal for its upcoming production of “The Nutcracker.” The rehearsal will be held at the dance studio in the downstairs parish hall of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and the public is invited to attend.

  • Doris Jackson, artist gallery manager at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, had her eye on a particular pedestal for years. John Werenko, executive director of the Art Center, joked she could have it when she decided to end her employment. On Wednesday she got her  pedestal.

    A recognition party was held Wednesday afternoon at Fuller Lodge to say farewell to Jackson who is leaving her work at the Art Center.

    Jackson started as the artist gallery manager at the Art Center in 2001 but her work with the organization extended well before that.

  • A kaleidoscope of art mediums will be spread throughout the Mesa Public Library’s gallery starting Tuesday.

    The exhibit titled, “All Mixed Up,” will showcase photography, quilting, sculpture and watercolors. The artists behind this artwork are Darlene Bawden, Arleeta Bawden, Cyndy Carter and Garth Tietjen.

    Tietjen said having a range of media should enhance the show.

  • The Los Alamos Lads of Enchantment (LOE) will hold its 18th Annual Barbershop Show on Friday and Saturday at the White Rock Baptist Church.  The show, “Love, Wonderful Love,” will feature the Lads of Enchantment and McPhly, the 2008 Barbershop Harmony Society Rocky Mountain District (RMD) Quartet Champion.

  • Los Alamos resident Robin Priestley has launched her pet sitting service just in time for the busy holiday travel season.

    Now an empty nester, Priestley turned her lifelong love of animals into a vocation. Her friend, Sylvia Hush, who has made quite a success of her own pet sitting business, inspired her.

  • An uncarved pumpkin is just a blank, seed-filled canvas. Each year, the community looks forward to seeing pumpkins transformed, some into classic Jack-o-lanterns with triangle eyes and toothy grins, others into something else – intricately carved portraits of witches speeding by on their brooms or of characters from the Simpsons.  

    One of the best parts of Halloween is seeing all the best work lit up in a long eerie line, a sort of pumpkin masquerade.

  • Alyx Jones, a member of Scout Varsity Team 222, received his Eagle Bronze Palm at a Court of Honor held Oct. 17.  

    This award required additional Merit Badges and service time beyond his Eagle Award. Scouting began for Jones in 2004 after having earned the “Arrow of Light” – the highest Cub Scouting award. Within a year he rose to the rank of First Class and soon received the “On My Honor” religious recognition.   

  • When I’m old, I’m going to have sagging, misshapen, ugly tattoos.

    People love to remind me of this.  A miserable buffalo, a rotten pear, a little king whose beautiful ermine coat needs ironing.

    Typically, it’s someone who doesn’t know me well and with whom I’ve never shared any philosophy about aging, death or even body art, who tells me this.

    Although I was only 18 years old when I got my first tattoo, I realized that eventually I would get old.

  • Jonathan Dowell’s head bobs as he begins to play the Mountain Dulcimer. His fingers pluck and slide along the dulcimer that is a rich colored wood and decorated with pearlescent designs. From these hand movements a sweet sound dances out from the instruments’ three strings.

    Dowell has been playing the Mountain Dulcimer for 15 years and has played many dulcimers but this particular one is different.

  • Hobbies can be fun and relaxing, but they also at times can be expensive and not earth-friendly.

    Join Katy Korkos and Terry Foxx at Pajarito Environmental Education Center for a three-part workshop focusing on the ins and outs of crafting using recycled and otherwise environmentally friendly materials.

    This class is designed to encourage imagination and ingenuity in using up and making do with items around us.

  • Thirty bucks may  look  like pocket change to some but it can actually create a significant change in someone’s life.

    For the past five years, Los Alamos High School teacher Allen Andraski   invited Maureen Mahoney-Barraclough, director of Aid For Africa, have proven how far a small amount of money can go.

    Every year Mahonney-Barraclough gives presentations about her experiences with families and orphans affected by HIV/AIDS in South Africa and Uganda to Andraski’s World History classes at Los Alamos High School.

  • The magic of Halloween is something anyone at any age can experience. It’s not just kids who get excited about it. Adults get in on the fun, too. For instance, the RE/MAX staff starts planning their Halloween decorations in July and Aspen Copies closes the store at noon on the day of Trick of Treat on MainStreet to transform into a haunted house.

    James Cline, who co-owns Aspen Copies with his wife, said the whole staff and even volunteers prepare the business to spook youngsters beginning at 5 p.m.

  • Curious characters can be seen hanging around Central Avenue. They might be leaning up on lampposts or sitting on benches, wearing goofy grins and oddball get-ups.  

    These creatively designed scarecrows may not frighten away the crows, but they do effectively welcome in the Halloween festivities and celebrate locals’ artistic sides.

    The Los Alamos Arts Council kicked off the annual scarecrow contest Saturday and the figures will be on display through Nov. 1. Judges will evaluate the scarecrows this week.

  • The Guitars and Gateaux series’ performers frequently describe the series as being something more than just a concert. They mention that a Guitars and Gateaux show features a relaxed, informal, friendly atmosphere and not only celebrates music but also decadent desserts.

    Tito Rios of the duo Sol y Luna is one of the performers who recognizes this quality of the guitar concerts. He said there is a closeness that the performer and the audience share.

  • Suzanne Morgan Williams, author of “Bull Rider,” her first novel for young adults will sign copies of her book from 6-                              7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Otowi Station Bookstore. Williams will also speak to classes at Los Alamos Middle School.

  • This week, we take a look at Asset #30, Responsibility and Asset #31, Risk Taking. According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they take responsibility for their own actions (and) … believe it is important not to be sexually active or to use alcohol and drugs.”

    Ahh, responsibility is a big one and an interesting one, too. I think the definition of responsibility for each family is probably very different.

  • Christmas shopping in October? Absolutely! Saturday, the Art Center at Fuller Lodge will host a “gateway to the holidays” show with dozens of artists returning and many new artists joining the 32nd annual Fall Arts and Crafts Fair at the Los Alamos Middle School. If you are already planning to visit the Los Alamos Heart Council Health Fair for a flu shot, why not reward yourself with a trip to the middle school to explore the beautiful array of unique and artistically crafted goods arriving from  across northern New Mexico?

  • Each year, millions of men, women and children are impacted by war and natural disasters. In these desperate circumstances, quick response is often the difference between life and death.

      From 1985 to 2008, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has shipped 61,308 tons of food and 132,028 tons of other supplies to more than 150 countries.

     In addition to providing materials, the Church also helps with funds and volunteers.