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Features

  • Betty Ehart Senior Center volunteer Mary Venable began a monthly support group for those facing macular degeneration and hearing challenges more than three years ago.

    The group often acquired a guest speaker, then with the help of community organizer, Karen Edwards, held a low vision expo several months later.

    “Macular Degeneration and hearing loss are of epidemic proportions and so much denial, even in our beloved community,” Venable said, who herself has some challenges.

  • Chamisa Elementary School transforms into a one-stop shop and mini mall this weekend, for early birds to gear up for a bit of Mother’s Day shopping.

    Scentsy Independent Consultant Tiffany Lovell is the mastermind behind the Mother’s Day Boutique, from 8 a.m.- 1p.m. Saturday.

    The more than 30 vendors include representatives for everything from Tupperware and homemade jewelry to Mary Kay Cosmetics and hand-made crafts, available for purchase for any gift-giving occasion.

  • The 60th birthday party for Los Alamos  County will take place June 10. As the community marks this milestone with a year-long calendar of events to honor the occasion, Living Treasures of Los Alamos celebrates its 10th anniversary by honoring Laurence Martin “Marty” Holland; Lawry and Alice Mann; and Dale Holm at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

  • Before the Manhattan Project and previous to the Ranch School, there were homesteaders.

    In 1862, the U.S. Congress passed the Homesteaders Act, Los Alamos author Dorothy Hoard said. Under this act, people applied for entry to live on a piece of land.

  • This week we look at Asset #7 Community Values Youth. According to the Search Institute, youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they perceive that adults in the community value youth.

    When I started my interest in working with Assets, our community rated 15 percent, according to our youth, on how the community valued them. While the current data results aren’t due back for a few months, I’m certain the tide is changing.

  • Easter offers a lot to celebrate. Therefore, local churches are opening their doors and inviting the community to join in the festivities.  

    A few churches are taking the celebrations outside.

    Messaih Evangelical Lutheran Church will host an outdoor service at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Overlook Park.

  • Members of Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church are joining Orthodox Christians all across America and the world in preparing for Holy Week and Pascha (Easter).  

    This preparation begins with the end of Great Lent on Saturday, Lazarus Saturday.

    Orthodox Christians use the Julian calendar for the calculation of the date of Pascha and this year the Feast of the Resurrection of Our Lord, Pascha, will be celebrated on April 19.

  • Unbeknownst to almost everyone, Rosie, a rose chafer beetle, played an important part in Charles Darwin’s voyage of discovery. Author and paleoanthropologist Anne Weaver signs her new illustrated chapter book, “The Voyage of the Beetle,” at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at Otowi Station Bookstore. Afterwards, Tea World will host a chat with Weaver and feature Dutch-treat snacks and drinks.

  • The first time I spoke to Madonna Wegloski I walked into her office with a question, but we were soon joking around. We laughed about the lack of scenic views at the Monitor. I pointed out that all we see in the newsroom is the top strip of the building next door and Madonna joked that all she saw was the parking lot.  Most of my memories of Madonna are like this - short snippets of her life.

  • Music that features every part of the orchestra, is new and familiar, and challenges and satisfies both the musician and the audience. These are the qualities in music that the music selection committee of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra uses in planning a program.

    These qualities are clearly and poignantly evident in the concert to be presented on April 17.

    The program will open with the “Fanfare for the Common Man” by Aaron Copland.  This piece for brass and percussion was composed in 1942.

  • The teenage brain is a mystery to any parent who has a young adult.

    Teenagers seem to lose their minds and parents wonder if they ever get them back. The answer rest assured is yes.

    On Saturday, the Los Alamos Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and UNM-LA in conjunction with partnering agencies will sponsor a symposium on the teenage brain, with two free presentations.

    JJAB Coordinator Debbie Gill knows that education is key in this community.

  • SOCORRO – More than 300 future scientists presented their research projects at the New Mexico State Science and Engineering Fair on Saturday in Socorro.

    Four high school students won all-expense paid trips to the International Science and Engineering Fair to be held next month in Reno, Nev.

    Nikita Bogdanov, Alexander Kendrick, Gabriel Joachim and Hee Sung Park were the top winners at Saturday’s event at New Mexico Tech.

    Bogdanov, from Albuquerque Academy, won for a project titled, “Can You Do the Water Walk?”

  • The Art Center at Fuller Lodge has expanded its reach to include every resident in the county of Los Alamos.

    With the inauguration of its first Biennial Membership Drive, Raffle and Donor Recognition, the Art Center Board of Directors wants to inform everyone in the county that the Art Center is more than a place for practicing visual artists or those who appreciate the visual arts but is a cultural and educational center for all.

  • A book is a mysterious thing. You never quite know what you are in for until the book cover is flipped opened.

    To celebrate the mystery and artistic quality of books, Mesa Public Library is hosting an exhibit that features the work of the LIBROS: New Mexico Book Arts Guild Saturday through April 18.

  • Eleven years ago, Gene and Phyllis Unterschuetz were in a transition in their lives. They sold their house in a Chicago suburb and bought an RV to go on a trip throughout the U.S. When they revved up the engine, it ignited the beginning of an amazing journey.

    The Unterschuetzes decided this trip would last between six month and a year, after which, they would buy a new house and get new jobs.

    During this tour, the Unterschuetzes, who are Baha’is, visited Baha’i communities and conducted what is called travel teaching or talks about faith.

  • I love movies about spies. Espionage films are wonderful because the spies use their brains rather than their muscles to combat their enemies. I also admire all the elaborate disguises and fancy techno-gadets that are used to outwit the bad guys in these movies.

    So I looked forward to watching “Duplicity” because it contains my favorite kind of heroes.

    It didn’t disappoint. The movie’s IQ soars to the top of the charts with its witty script and clever plot twists.

  • The spotlight is loving the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. The company is dancing into the forefront of the ballet world with its upcoming performance.

    Each of the ballets offers something special for the audience. Famous choreographer Twlya Tharp choreographed the piece, “Sue’s Leg,” which launched her career.

    Jennica Lundin, director of marketing at the ballet company, said no other company is currently performing the piece and Tharp hand-selected the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet to dance her ballet.

  • It’s absurd how I have allowed TV to become my major form of entertainment. It’s the thing I turn to when I don’t know what else to do.

    Sometimes I justify turning the television on by telling myself it provides some noise in my apartment so it won’t be so eerily quiet.

    But in reality, whatever appears on the screen generally suckers me onto the couch to passively observe whatever is on TLC or HGTV.

  • “How shall I begin my story that has no beginning?” Esperanza Quintero says in her opening narration to “Salt of the Earth.” It’s more than a poetic line and it’s far more than just her story.

    It’s as though Esperanza speaks of the human story – the constant struggle of mankind versus itself. Where does such a story begin and more importantly, how can it evolve?

  • During a German Club meeting on March 23, Sponsor Anita Boshier had organized a celebration for her German students who participated in the National German Exams this year.

    Eight students, Emily TenCate, Bethany McBride, Jonathan Robey, Celeste Ranken, Sky Korber, David Li, Hannah Denevers and Rachel Hill received medals and book prizes for being among the top 90th percentile of more than 26,000 students who took the National German Examination administered by the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) in 2008.