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Features

  • In a gift store where I once worked, was a section nicknamed, “Old Farts.” In this tiny corner of  the shop were figurines of pudgy old-timers taking a swing with their golf clubs or sitting in a beauty parlor hair matted in curlers. All the figures  had dazed, ho-hum expressions painted on their faces.

    The items in this section of the store would have just seemed cheesy and stereotypical to some but I found them laughable because they depicted images so unlike the elders in my family, specifically my grandparents.

  • Grab your rodeo gear, whiskey bottle and siren-red dress!  The Los Alamos Little Theatre is hosting auditions for its September production of the Sam Shepard one-act dramedy “Fool for Love.”

    LALT veteran Corey New will direct the play and former LALT president Jennifer Wadsack will produce it.  

  • “Adolescents cannot feel the future,” was the best take-home message from Dr. Abagail Baird and the Teen Brain Symposium sponsored by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board, earlier this month.

    Humor and insight were the order of the day as Baird provided perspective into why teenagers do “stupid stuff.” The truth is there are physical differences in the adolescent decision making process, which make it unique.

    The short answer is that the portion of the brain called the frontal lobe hasn’t fully developed yet.

  • Saturday, the 42nd annual Spring Arts and Crafts Fair will be held on the lawn at Fuller Lodge. This year’s fair will be held from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. The Los Alamos Arts Council has presented the spring fair since 1967 and this year’s event will be one of the best ever.

  • Dance Arts Los Alamos will present its annual Early Childhood Recital at 10 a.m. Saturday at Piñon Elementary School in White Rock.

    Audience members will have the opportunity to bid on a piano in a silent auction. Admission is free and a reception to honor the dancers will follow.

    DALA’s Early Childhood program is designed to introduce dance in a fun and supportive environment with the goal of instilling a life-long love of dance and movement.

  • An interest in partying is a world-trait. Thursday, Aspen Elementary School will be whooping it up in the form of a carnival.

    The entire school is getting involved, Stephanie Rittner, an art teacher said, is getting involved. Kindergarteners through sixth-graders will participate in a parade, exhibit their artwork and second- and first-graders will perform a dance.

    Music will also be played.

    The parade, which will be for parents, will begin at   1:45 p.m.

  • One of Los Alamos’ longest resident families, the Wilsons will spread their artwork throughout the library’s upper gallery.

    It is more than just art being celebrated; the show is also honoring family. It is even in the name of the show, Coschwivancundun, which is a “tribal name,” and combines everyone’s last names.

    The exhibit kicks off with a reception from 2-4 p.m. on Saturday. The show runs through May 30.

  • In a world with a lot of complexities and conflicts, people are looking for guidance and answers to solve society’s issues.

    Aid will be given May 7, which is National Day of Prayer. Gloria Streit will lead the service. The event begins at 11:30 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church.

    A worship service will kick things off. From noon-1 p.m. the program will stop and go so attendees arrive and leave when they wish.

  • Music, laced with poetry, creates a weaving fit for springtime. It seems appropriate then, that the Coro de Camara is spreading out a blanket of flowery poetry and music, during its upcoming concert, which will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday at the United Church. The group will present the concert again at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the Scottish Rite Center in Santa Fe.

    For the concert, “April Flowers,” Coro de Camara member Laura Erikson said, “the program is choral music set to wonderful poetry of flowers and spring.

  • The Los Alamos Concert Association’s Jewel of a Season wraps up May 3, with a performance by Julia Fischer. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in Duane Smith Auditorium.

  • Thursdays have traditionally been my favorite day. It started in elementary school because that was the day my second grade class went to the school library. Later, it became my favorite day because it signified the beginning of the end of the work week. I reasoned that Friday was just around the corner and I had successfully made it through another week.

    But Thursday means something else to me now. On this particular day, when I see 12:30 p.m. appear on my computer screen, I give a silent cheer. This is when I meet with my friends for our weekly lunch.

  • “I think I was born in the wrong era,” said Los Alamos High School student Chelsy Smith, who plays Gloria in the high school’s production of “Bye, Bye Birdie.” While returning to a time when poodle skirts were fashionable and the Ed Sullivan Show was the rage, Smith decided the ’50s suit her.

    Hopefully after traveling back to this nostalgic time period, the musical’s audience will also embrace the ’50s.

  • Two years ago, Jerry Barlow made his debut performance in the Guitar and Gateaux series. Thursday, he will be back for an encore performance.

    Barlow, an acclaimed Celtic finger style guitarist, is eager to return to the series after a successful first show. “I enjoy performing for a warm and appreciative audience,” he said.

    Barlow said Los Alamos residents clearly show a love of the guitar and music.

    He added it is always nice to have a welcoming audience.

  • The local Alzheimer’s Support Group will host the first Alzheimer’s Café from 2-4 p.m. Thursday at the White Rock Baptist Church.

    “We first heard of the idea from a postcard for the Santa Fe Alzheimer’s Cafe,” said Vickie Griffis, support group organizer. “We did a little research and found out these cafés are opening up all over the world. The first one opened in the Netherlands in 1997 to support caregivers.”

  • This Friday, folks at Piñon Elementary will put their backs into some shovel work to beautify the campus and celebrate Arbor Day.

    “We are having a school-wide event for campus beautification that includes rotational activities for students with everything from helping improve our field, a walk a thon for our track fundraiser, planting trees an hedges to PEEC activities,” Principal Megan Lee said.

    PTO President Melanie McKinley is thrilled about the event and their sponsors.

  • The Los Alamos Youth Leadership program works hard throughout the community all year long. The ninth through 12-grade students attend a two-day summer leadership orientation before being divided into teams that work together during the school year.

    The 30 students are divided into three teams that work on a variety of projects that benefit the community in many ways.

    The teams select names, assign duties and carry out out tasks all in the name of community and leadership.

  • This week, we take a look at Asset #8, Youth as Resources. According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they are given useful roles in the community.”

    This asset might be best understood by first approaching it from a family perspective. Do your children or grandchildren have tasks they do as a useful role in the family? Even if they don’t admit it, that’s where it all begins. Everyone needs to have a role in the family to feel like a valued part of it.

  • Stephen Betts ran track and cross-country for one-and-a-half years in high school and then hung up his running shoes. Well, the running shoes are coming down because Betts, a Los Alamos resident, is taking on the mother lode of races, the Boston Marathon.

    Two things inspired Betts, a Los Alamos National Laboratory employee and Bishop of the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Los Alamos ward, to take part in the marathon.

  • Michelle Holland became a poet in high school. She liked to write but staying in the rules and guidelines of writing just wasn’t her thing.

    “I wasn’t a very good prose writer in high school,” she said, “(but) I wanted to write. I liked to keep a journal but I wasn’t good at putting together sentences and paragraphs.”

    Poetry offered a way out of all the rules. She wrote the way she thought poetry should be written.

  • The YMCA is the place to be this Saturday as youth across the nation celebrate YMCA Healthy Kids Day.

    The free fun is a national YMCA event intended to give youth an opportunity to visit their local YMCA and discover some of the activities, programs and events that it offers.

    The nationwide slogan of “Put Play in Your Day,” emphasizes the more fun youth have participating in physical activity, the more likely they are to continue and to lead a healthy life style.