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Features

  • Taste the zip of a Feta crumble tucked into a fresh tomato. Smell the golden spanikopita stuffed with spinach. Take a bite of baklava from the recipe of YiaYia Maria Marros and savor the flaky layers of honey and nuts. 

    At 5 p.m. Sunday, the members of the Saint Dimitri of Rostov Orthodox Church will host a dinner for the community where they will serve a sampling of ethnic and Mediterranean dishes.

    After every liturgy, the families at Saint Dimitri’s will have a meal together.

  • A new stake presidency was established for the Santa Fe Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    Elder Russell M. Nelson, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, along with Elder Jonathan C. Roberts of the Quorum of the Seventy, traveled from Salt Lake City to establish  the new presidency.

     The new  presidency was made during the stake conference  held Aug. 29-30.

  • A lot of images are associated with Ruby K’s Yum Runs. Young children bolting down Central Avenue during the children’s 1K run, older runners stretching and warming up for the 5K and 10K runs, local business providing support through refreshments and T-shirts.

    It’s an event that brings multiple generations together in the early morning hours. And while fun times are definitely strong components of the event, this event comes with a significant purpose.

  • More magnificent musical melodies will fill the air this week as Dr. Gregory Schneider kicks off another season of Music Together.

    The preschool aged program runs for ten weeks and takes place in both Los Alamos and White Rock.  

    The classes began this week and will run 10 weeks. Two classes are held Mondays at 9 a.m. in White Rock Town Hall and 5 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.  

  • When I was 5 years old, I thought our apartment was haunted by the spirit of a girl exactly my age who’d been pushed down the stairs and killed by her parents. I thought I slept in her room. I thought she lived in my closet and made the room cold at night.

    A year or two later, I believed the spirit of my father’s little sister, who died when she was 7, would try to drown me in the shower. I looked behind myself dozens of times every time I shampooed my hair. I would wash as fast as I could and leap into my towel.

  • Sam Shepard’s play “Fool for Love,” now playing at the Los Alamos Little Theatre, is distinctly not a family show.  It contains strong language, violence and content suitable for mature audiences only.  

  • Some may consider reading to be a solitary and sedentary activity. Well, Aspen Elementary School will introduce a new perspective toward reading starting Thursday.

    This year’s Scholastic Book Fair not only brings books and different activities to the whole family, it also offers the chance to take literary travels around the world.

    The theme for this year’s book fair, Aspen Librarian Kristine Bennett said, is “Read Around the World.”

  • Love is a subject that the Los Alamos Little Theater has tackled in the past. A woman falls in love with Van Gogh in “Starry Night;” a personal ad brings a woman from Maine to the plains of Kansas to get married in “Sarah, Plain and Tall;” a Shakespeare festival brings romance to two strangers in “Time Enough.”  

    The community theater has shown love is all sorts of situations, but in its latest play, “Fool for Love,” the subject is taken to a whole different level.

  • Los Alamos High School students Emma Carroll, Kathy Lin, Jamie Resnick, Shaina Riciputi, Dov Shlachter and Kendra Smale are a part of a nationwide group of students who share an impressive accomplishment.

    Carroll, Lin, Resnick, Riciputi, Shlachter and Smale are among the 16,000 semifinalists in the 55th annual National Merit Scholarship Program.

    To be a semifinalist means they are able to continue to compete for approximately 8,200 National Merit Scholarships that are worth more than $36 million that will be offered next spring.

  • When it comes to art, there is no age requirement. Individuals do not need to be an adult to explore their creativity. Therefore, for its fall 2009 classes and workshops, the Art Center at Fuller Lodge is opening its doors to the younger generation of artists.

    These classes for elementary through middle school students include Alternative Perceptions, Clay: Fun, Form and Function, Drawing of the Animal World, Portraits of Self and Others and Tie Dye.

  • In one image, the sunlight glares off the side of a Coke bottle, creating a blinding oblong star over the famous red label. In another, a narrow river suddenly plummets into an avalanche of white rapids. Both objects look completely believable, solid and without-a-doubt three-dimensional.

    Never mind that the bottle is 5-feet tall, or that instead rushing down the side of the side of a mountain, the river and its attendant waterfall crash down the paved un-magnificent,  flat sidewalk.

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  • On Sept. 18, the two-day Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah begins. Rosh Hashanah is Hebrew for “head of the year” and this day begins the Jewish year 5770.

    The holiday celebrates the creation of mankind and features festive meals and New Year good wishes. It also begins a 10-day period of personal reassessment and atonement.

  • The opportunity to perform in the White Rock’s 60th anniversary party is an invitation the local band, The Laminators, are happy to accept.

    The band, which includes Mark Clay on drums, Louie Jalbert on lead guitar, Dave Martin on rhythm guitar and Bob Manzanares on bass guitar, will perform a medley of music at 5 p.m. Sunday in White Rock’s Rover Park.

    Jalbert said the band performs 50s, 60s classic jazz, swing, rock n’ roll, country and occasionally throw in one or two variations on a standard.

  • When I was about 8 years old, I got it into my head that I would run away from home. At that particular time my family and I were living in a neighborhood in Knoxville, Tenn., that still had vacant lots and new construction. I imagined myself taking shelter in the wooden skeleton of one of those new houses.

    I read books about runaways including “My Side of the Mountain” and I figured if those young children could make a successful go of it then I could, too. However, I failed miserably. I didn’t even make it out the door.

  • Even if you haven’t looked at a still life in recent memory, it’s time to consider this art form again at the exhibition “Still Life Revisited.”

    The Art Center at Fuller Lodge will host an opening reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday and the public is invited to come and meet many of the artists who have offered their interpretations of the theme.

  • Los Alamos has always nurtured the arts and on Friday, its artistry will be in full bloom. Village Arts, Mesa Public Library, Los Alamos Historical Museum and the Art Center at Fuller Lodge will all be bursting with color, creativity and innovation during the Arts Crawl from 4-8 p.m.

    The timing for this event is perfect since Los Alamos has designated September as Arts and Culture Month.

  • The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation is accepting donations of gently used wind instruments for use by students in the LAPS music programs grades five through 12.

     It is important that the instruments be in working order.

    Instruments requiring minor repair will also be accepted because the foundation does have the means to repair them.

    Donations can be dropped off at the Los Alamos Public Schools district office, 751 Trinity Drive, between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. through Friday as well as Sept. 14-18.

  • Sam Shepard’s play “Fool for Love” kicks off the Los Alamos Little Theatre’s 2009-2010 theatrical season, which has been dedicated to the loving memory of John Mench, a founding member of LALT who passed away recently.

    LALT veteran Corey New directs “Fool for Love,” while former LALT president Jennifer Wadsack produces it.  

    Although “Fool for Love” is set contemporarily on the edge of the Mojave Desert, it plays more like a Greek tragedy come to life out of hazy remnants from the Wild West.