• In the story titled, “Coro de Camara enchants audiences,” in Sunday’s Spectrum, the venue for the April 30 performance was erroneously listed as Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church’s Kelly Hall. The concert will be at 7 p.m. April 30 at the United Church.

  • Join the Los Alamos Mountaineers and their own Dave Dogruel Wednesday, as he describes his experiences in the Cascade Glacier School and his subsequent climb of Mt. Rainier.
    The meeting will begin with dessert and social time at 7:30 p.m., followed by a discussion of trips past and future. The presentation will begin at approximately 8 p.m.
    The Cascade Glacier School is offered at no charge every year by SummitClimb.com to bring people together to learn, practice and enjoy glacier and snow travel techniques and attempt a climb of one of the classic Cascade volcanoes.
    It is also an introduction to the treks and climbs led by Himalayan expedition leader Dan Mazur and his staff.

  • Assets In Action and the Service Learning class taught by Stephanie Krantz spent last week assembling Chains of Kindness, kicked off in the beginning of the year with Rachel’s Challenge. Students have listed good deeds done by others, which will be formed into one great chain in May. Assets In Action is sponsored by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    All of our fully reconditioned adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro-chipped.
    Be sure to check out links to our many pets at the Friends of the Shelter Web site: www.lafos.org. You can also volunteer or make a donation.  
    We get lots of roaming cats and dogs. Don’t assume your cat was a meal for a coyote. Check with the shelter and see if your best friend is bunking with us. Proof of rabies vaccination is required when claiming your pet.


  • Thanks for helping the community
    We wish to thank Los Alamos National Bank again for a very generous contribution to the Gift Fund of the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center. LANB’s support allows lower-income children and adults in Los Alamos and surrounding communities to have access to our programs of lessons, exercise and recreation.
    During 2010, recipients of all ages were supported by this program and greatly enjoyed using the Aquatic Center.

  • I’d like to take this opportunity to break from the planned column of the week just to speak about relationships, which is what assets are really all about.
    The particular relationship I’d like to speak about is my relationship with State Representative Jeanette Wallace.
    In 2000, I was hired as the Maternal and Child Health Council Coordinator. The job was to look at the issues of women of childbearing age and their children. I assumed, since I interviewed at 8-1/2 months pregnant for the job, I was a shoo in, but we’ll never know if that was the case.
    At one point the councils were in jeopardy of losing their funding and we rallied the troops (all state coordinators) to the Roundhouse, for an “Educate the Legislature Day.”

  • A choral concert, “If Music Be the Food of Love, Sing On,” will be at 7 p.m. April 30 at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church’s Kelly Hall, 3900 Trinity Dr.

    The concert, performed by Coro de Camara, will feature music from the Renaissance to today, including pieces from Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Brahms, Mendelssohn, Durufle, Copland, Thompson and others.

    The group does not charge admission to its performances, but donations are accepted at the door.
    Coro de Camara is a chorus of the room (or chamber) as the Spanish name translates and is made up of a group of 16-24 vocalists, depending on the repertoire.

  • By participating in UNM-LA’s eight-week Summer Bridge Program 2011, high school graduates and GED Recipients can get a tuition-free head start on college.  
    “Students enroll with a cohort of other first-time college students and receive personalized attention from the UNM-LA staff and faculty,” said Student Advisor Jackie La New.  “The students will take classes together, participate in focused study sessions with faculty, learn to navigate college, and build a support network of other students, faculty and staff.”
    This summer, students will take a math or English course and have the option to take a one-credit course of introduction to opera, T’ai Chi Chu’un, yoga, or aquatic aerobics.  

  • One spring morning, the birds outside Becky and Tom Shankland’s house at the edge of White Rock Canyon set up a ruckus.
    They hurried to the window to see the birds scolding something — a cat. Not a neighborhood house cat prowling for a feathered snack, but a slightly larger creature with a distinctive spotted coat and cropped tail. A bobcat.
    Bobcats are fairly common but secretive predators in much of New Mexico, including Los Alamos County.
    According to Rick Winslow, a carnivore biologist with the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, there are about 35,000 to 55,000 bobcats in New Mexico and in Los Alamos, their population density is comparable to that of coyotes.

  • The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos will host a scholarship fundraiser at Central Avenue Grill on Saturday. Proceeds from the fundraiser will provide scholarships to UNM-Los Alamos students and assist them in successfully completing their educational goals.
    “UNMLA serves both traditional and non-traditional students. Many of our adult students do not have the same scholarship options as our students entering college directly after high school graduation,” said Director of Students Services Dr. Patricia Boyer.

  • Join Pajarito Environmental Education Center at the Second Bloom Goat Farm in White Rock from 1-3 p.m. Sunday, for a chance to learn how to make lavender lotion, balms and bars.  
    Debby Wood, owner of the Second Bloom Farm, will use local beeswax and lavender, as well as local lavender essential oils and her goats’ milk, to demonstrate how she makes lavender lotion balms and bars.
    Each participant will take home their own balm and bar after the class. The session will also feature a tour of the farm, where participants will get to meet this year’s crop of  kid goats.  

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, April 15, 2011
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – LIVE!
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting (Replay 4-05-11)
    03:00 PM Troop 22 Eagle Court of Honor Program
    04:15 PM New Mexico History Conference – Nancy Bartlitt
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Manhattan Project Memories”
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Pure Mind
    09:00 PM UCTV

    Saturday, April 16, 2011
    8:30 Budget Hearings
    5:00 UCTV

  • Anyone walking into Danne DeBacker’s house might think, “This man is compulsively creative.” There are a few reasons for this thought. For one, he replaced the door to his studio with one that looks like the opening of a submarine.
    He also invents games like the “cube eater,” which consists of a cube with a big, toothy mouth.  Kids toss numbered cubes into the mouth and learn how to add.
    In addition, when he turned nine, his birthday present was a series of traditional Japanese watercolor lessons. He has homemade trains and guitars all over his house.

  • Some artists are born into their craft and realize from a very young age that they have talent, while others make the discovery of a hidden talent later in life.
    Robert “Spooner” Marcus, an artist from Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo can identify with being born into an artistic family as well as discovering his talent for art as he grew older.
    His great-grandmother and grandmother are potters, his mother makes ceramics and his younger brother also does pottery, so it’s no surprise that this artist would endeavor to take his skills to a higher level.

  • The next meeting of the Los Alamos Geological Society  will be at 7:30 p.m. April 19 at the Christian Church, 92 East Road.  
    The group will highlight student achievements in earth science research with the presentations of 2011 Los Alamos County Science Fair winners Julia Murphy, Alexander Kendrick and Ryan Erickson.
    Their three senior-level student projects were presented at the 2011 Los Alamos County Science Fair and received recognition by LAGS for outstanding projects related to Earth Science.  
    LAGS will host short presentations by each of those students at this month’s meeting.

  • The Española Public Library will celebrate National Library Week through April 16.
    Activities for children and families are ongoing. From 11:30-1 p.m. Thursday, the Friends of the Library will host a reception for National Library Week that will include a book discussion and book signing with local authors Robert Trapp, Robert Torrez and Isabel Ziegler. Luncheon refreshments will be served.
    Saturday’s activity will celebrate Dia De Los Niños and will include a book give-away to all children, while supplies last.
    A Book by author Pat Mora will be read. Mora is the founder of Dia de Los Niños.
    For more information call the library at 505-747-6087 or visit www.youseemore.com/espanola.

  • Despite the lack of snow this winter, the ski patrol from Pajarito Mountain have continued their training.
    In February, Grace and Seth Longon, Nate Phillips and Nate Kamm, four local young adult ski patrollers attended the National Ski Patrol Young Adult Patrol Jamboree at Copper Mountain, Colo.
    The Rocky Mountain Division hosted 17 young patrollers from six regional ski areas and held an in-depth program on avalanche safety and rescue.
    The young patrollers dug a snow pit to evaluate the snow layers and risk of avalanche occurring. They used locator beacons, avalanche probes and shovels to search for buried mock victims.

  • Kathy Brown of The Seventh Generation Institute in Santa Fe will visit Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 7 p.m. Wednesday, to talk about how climate change is affecting pikas and what citizen scientists can do to help.
    Hikers visiting the highest peaks of New Mexico, have probably seen the little relatives of the rabbit family or heard the pika’s distinct high-pitched squeak coming from the talus slopes they call home. Like polar bears, pikas have gained attention as early indicators of the effects of climate change on wildlife.

  • On May 1, the Los Alamos Phi Beta Kappa Association will hold its 55th annual banquet to honor the top graduates of Los Alamos High School.
    Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest undergraduate honors society in the United States and has about 260 members in Los Alamos County (1.5 percent of the county’s population).  
    The banquet, for the honor graduates, Phi Beta Kappa Members, and their guests, will be at 5:30 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. The Decadent Table will cater the event.