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Features

  • Getting paid to do a little yard work is a typical summer activity for a teenager, but not many teens pay someone else for the opportunity to pull weeds in the July heat. Earlier this month 20 teens from Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish did just that.  

  • Zigfried “Zig” Hampel-Arias was recently awarded a Fulbright U.S. Student Program grant for the 2009-2010 academic year to Argentina. Hampel-Arias will in high-energy particle physics by conducting research with the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory Collaboration in San Carlos de Bariloche. The Los Alamos native received his bachelor’s degree from Rice University and is a classically trained pianist who plans to take tango, dance and piano lessons while in Argentina.   

     

  • Although the Jimmy Stadler Band canceled its Friday performance in the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series, it opened the door to allow for one of the series’ most popular bands to take the stage at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond.

    The Nomads, currently comprised of local musicians Eddy Partridge, Wilfred Romero, Bob Carmen and David Banes, have been around since the 1980s, entertaining the crowd with rock n’ roll songs from the 1950s, 60s and 70s.

    “They play songs that everyone knows,” said concert organizer Russ Gordon.

  • Sage Cottage may normally be an institution of learning, but from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, it will be the center for fun.

    A carnival, complete with a jumping house, milk bottle toss, bubble tub, arts and crafts table, face painting and music, will be open to children and their families.

    Additionally, a clown is scheduled to make an appearance and a juggler is expected  as well.

    Besides the carnival fare, food can be purchased and a silent auction, featuring everything from gift cards to a week’s vacation at a Pagosa Springs condo, will be offered.

  • Pinocchio,” is a familiar story. An animated puppet endures several trials to become a real boy.  Missoula Children’s Theater, however, inserted an educational twist to this classic tale. In order to become a real boy, Pinocchio needs to learn how to behave.

    The fictional character isn’t the only one learning a thing or two during the course of the play. The real-life actors are also gaining some knowledge by participating in this production.

  • Birthday parties have always been a big deal in my family. Since I was young, the dining room is always decorated with streamers and balloons and we are given the privilege of selecting the dinner menu, served on my great-grandmother’s hand-painted china.

    When my sister and I were little, we always requested a spaghetti dinner. When we were older, it was my mother’s triple layer chocolate cake that we constantly chose for dessert.

    Besides presents to the birthday person, my mother handed out goodie bags for each member of the family.

  • Following another spectacular sunset, a new production of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” opened at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday night, 222 years after its Prague premier.  A young cast of mostly fresh faces (five of the eight roles were SFO debuts, and three were former apprentices) took on this challenging classic, with varying amounts of success.

  • Young

    entrepreneurs

    On behalf of the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation and the UNM-LA Small Business Development Center, we would like to extend a large thank you to the following companies, organizations and individuals for their support of the 2009 Youth Business Grant Program.  In its 24th year, the program provides an opportunity for youth in the area to learn the basics of entrepreneurship and business operation.  The program would not be possible without the contributions of time, money, and energy from a variety of sources.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #20, Time at Home.  According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they go out ‘with nothing special to do’ two or fewer nights per week.”

    Now I’m glad that little quote comes directly from the Search Institute because I swear I heard audible gasps coming from homes throughout the community on that one. I think I’d like to rephrase this one to ask, do your children like to be at home?

  • Dean of Instruction Kate Massengale was recently granted tenure at UNM-Los Alamos. She is the first ever tenured faculty member at UNM-LA. In addition, Massengale was promoted from assistant to associate professor.

    “We are looking to build a more substantial group of tenured faculty at UNM-LA,” Massengale said. “The UNM administration in Albuquerque has made a commitment to this endeavor, which shows their ongoing support for UNM-LA.”

  • The dogs trotted around as if they were  warming up for the task ahead of them. Clancey, a coon hound and Osita, a Bouvier des Flandres, seemed excited as they sniffed the ground and the air. Somewhere in the forest surrounding the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, people were lost and last Saturday morning, the two dogs, along with three volunteers from Mountain Canine Corps, a nonprofit search and rescue organization, prepared to find them.

  • Los Alamos changed a lot since Kathleen “Kay” Manley first arrived in 1943. She watched the town evolve from a secret place that was hidden from the map to an official county of New Mexico. She saw muddy roads become paved streets and neighborhoods appear.

    But Kay did not passively watch these changes from the sidelines; she helped to nurture the local community in several areas including music.

  • Los Alamos First United Methodist Church’s Vacation Bible School will not be a run-of-the-mill classroom lecture.

    Rather than sitting at desks, the Bible school is turning learning about Christianity into a game.

    In fact, the theme for the Vacation Bible School is Studio Go Theme Show.

    Camille Westcott, organizer for the Vacation Bible School, explained each day the program will start and end with a game-show and students will have the opportunity to compete in the game and win prizes.

  • His humor has been called impish, his songwriting skills have been referred to as creative and his performances are honored as being fearless. Steve Poltz’s music summons a barrage of descriptions and his life reflects his work.

    According to his website, Poltz was born in Nova Scotia; he was raised in Palm Springs and went to college in San Diego.

    He performed with the band, Rugburns, spending the majority of the year touring in a beat-up van and the song he co-wrote with Jewel, “You Were Meant for Me,” landed on the Billboard Top 10.

  • More than 250 local Harry Potter fans turned out at the Reel Deal Theater for a midnight showing of “Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince” Tuesday night.

    The mass of Harry Potter devotees – the majority of whom were around the same age as the film’s hero, 16-year-old Harry Potter (played by 20-year-old Daniel Radcliffe)– was enough to fill two screens at the Reel Deal Theatre.

    The enthusiastic crowd – including some who waited in line over five hours - applauded as the lights dimmed in the theater at the start of the show.

  • Writer’s block – a dull name for a horribly dull feeling. I picture my parietal cortex lying on a well-used wooden cutting board, an Alaskan ulu knife beside it, eager, the way all knives are.

    I don’t mean to overdramatize. That is how it feels: Like part of my brain is utterly inaccessible. It might still be inside my skull. It might be in the kitchen with the dirty ice cream bowl. Either way, all I get is a headache.

  • Rows of pristine, shiny cars can be spotted Saturday at the Elks Lodge #2083.

    Viewers will be treated to a wide range of automobiles including vintage, muscle, Euro and just plain unique cars. Additionally, motorcycles and antique tractors will be presented.

    This show is more than just automobile eye candy; proceeds from car registrations, which is $25 per vehicle, will go toward several charity organizations. Valerie Wilson of the Elks Lodge said the Elks’ main charity is the National Cerebral Palsy Foundation.

  • White Rock Presbyterian Church’s mission partner on the Navajo reservation is House of Fellowship, a small church 11 miles south of Gallup that serves several Navajo communities. Many in the community still live without running water or electricity.  Rev. Fred Thomas and his wife Lorraine, both Navajo Indians from that area, reach out to the community in many ways, including doing housing repairs, hauling wood and visiting and praying with the elderly and shut-ins.

  • Friends of the Shelter (FOS) is a small but dedicated animal rescue group that has saved the lives of homeless pets for more than 10 years.

    Besides working to find loving homes for lost and abandoned cats and dogs, FOS provides funds to pay for neutering rescued animals and pets of low-income owners.  Annually, it provides a grant to the Española Valley Humane Society for their special spay/neuter weeks, when they perform dozens of surgeries at no cost to the owner.  

  • The faculty and staff of UNM-Los Alamos are reaching out to the community to help students get started in college.

    The Bridge to Success Scholarship bridges the gap between high school or GED acquisition and the New Mexico Lottery Scholarship.

    The Lottery Scholarship begins at the start of a student’s second semester in college.

    The first semester is the qualifying semester. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 12 credit hours, with a 2.5 or higher GPA.