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Features

  • An upcoming fundraiser is presenting the community with a win-win situation.

    Participants at the fundraiser can treat themselves to a meal and an evening out while supporting a worthy cause.

  • “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people could change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” - Margaret Mead

    This week, we look at asset nine, Service to Others. I know it sounds rather like a parent favoring one child over another, but asset-wise, this one is near the top of the list for me.

  • Violinist Chang Guo and pianist Yin Shi will host a concert at 7 p.m. March 4 at the Christian Church. Besides being introduced to Guo, a virtuoso violinist, former U.S. Congressman Bill Redmond will give a short presentation about rapid transformation of Chinese society and the influence of the Christian church. Read more in tomorrow's paper.

     

  • Purim, the Jewish holiday that will be held on Sunday, is no solemn occasion. In fact, cranking up the noise in celebration is encouraged.

    David Izraelevitz of the Jewish Center explained that the story behind Purim features heroism and a happy ending, which calls for some vocal merriment.

    During the celebration, a reading of the Book of Esther is conducted.

  • Journalists are low on popularity polls. The idea that we’re a motley crew seems to be conventional wisdom. I’ve been told since high school, maybe even earlier, that the public does not trust the media.

    I was reminded of people’s suspicion toward reporters when I raised a question to a panel of business owners while on an assignment one afternoon. “Watch out,” the moderator had jokingly warned the local entrepreneurs, this question was coming from the media.

  • While chile peppers and tortillas can be found in abundance in New Mexico, seafood is a different story. If your mouth is watering for a crustacean, don’t plan a trip to a coastal destination, just head down to the Rotary Club of Los Alamos’s crab fest.

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  • It will be a series of firsts at the Guitars and Gateaux concert on Thursday – both for the performer and for the audience.

  • The Los Alamos Winter Farmer’s Market is more than just a place to purchase bread; it’s an opportunity for organizations to collaborate and for the community to learn about area businesses.

    The event is held from 8 a.m.-noon the second Thursday of every month at Fuller Lodge.

    It’s a monthly event that features dedicated businesses. Some vendors travel as far as 200 miles round trip, to furnish items for the market.

  • On March 7, the Los Alamos Concert Association welcomes one of the most-respected early-music groups to Los Alamos.  Ensemble Caprice will perform a concert of Renaissance and Baroque period music at 4 p.m. in Duane Smith Auditorium. The concert will be followed by dinner with the artists at the Central Avenue Grill. Read more in Thursday's Kaleidoscope.

     

  • Heart disease seems to be full of stealth. Like a predator approaching its prey, cardiovascular diseases can creep unnoticed and silent until they spring into a brutal attack. Similar to other predators, these diseases can be misunderstood. Therefore, the Los Alamos Heart Council is providing some education and insight to these quiet killers.

    The council is hosting its annual community seminar at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the First Baptist Church, located at 2200 Diamond Drive.

  • University of New Mexico-Los Alamos may be a community college but its influence extends beyond county lines. For instance, student Lise Lookman has been named to the 2010 New Mexico All-State Academic Team.

    Team members were recognized at a ceremony held Feb.11 at the State Capitol in Santa Fe. In addition to being eligible for state scholarships, New Mexico team members are eligible to compete for the USA Today sponsored All- USA Academic Team.

  • The Los Alamos High School Science Bowl team won first place in the regional competition for the National Science Bowl, held Feb. 13, on the Albuquerque Academy campus. Thirty-four teams from Northern New Mexico high schools competed in the regional event.

  • Enter a world filled with fairies, courtiers, a king and queen, a handsome prince, and — of course — Princess Aurora this weekend when New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company (NMDT-PC) presents “The Sleeping Beauty.” Read more in tomorrow's Kaleidoscope.

     

  • Enter a world filled with fairies, courtiers, a king and queen, a handsome prince, and — of course — Princess Aurora this weekend when New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company (NMDT-PC) presents “The Sleeping Beauty.”

  • Like many, the events that occurred on Sept. 11, 2001 had a deep impact on Santa Fe writer and former diplomat Michael Morgan.

    “After  9/11, I was concerned. Besides from the immediate clashes around the world, there was a clash of narratives. Part of the clashes were mistaken, based on misinformation,” Morgan said.

    As a result, he wrote “Lost History: The Enduring Legacy of Muslim Scientists, Thinkers and Artists.” National Geographic published the book in 2007.

  • Watching the first moments of the New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company’s production of “The Sleeping Beauty” on a cold February night gave me the same feeling I experience when I notice spring bulbs poking through the snow and frozen ground. It’s a giddiness that something great is on its way. The gray and gloom of winter is dwindling.

    Likewise, NMDT-PC’s “The Sleeping Beauty” offers all the sparkle, color and sweetness to escape a gray day.

  • Saturday night’s performance of “Parted Waters” at Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe was a treat for the mind, heart and soul.  

    Local playwright Robert Benjamin’s drama of a New Mexican family grappling with their Judaic roots presents a credible snapshot of how three generations of Hispanic men come to different terms with their ancestry.  

    On yet another level, the play suggests the crucial need for acceptance and respect for cultural differences among all people.

  • I wish I had. I regret not. Why didn’t I?

    I’m not old yet, but I know lots of sentences that start like that. They tend to revolve around high school. I wish I had spent more time thinking about what I wanted, instead of what other people might want. I regret not telling people who I was or what mattered to me. All I ever said was a bunch of crap.

  • Local photographer Jim O’Donnell recently visited the wildlife refuge Bosque del Apache and took photographs of a few feathered inhabitants. These artistic shots included a Great Blue Heron, Red Tail Hawk and Snow geese.