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Features

  • The parking lot sale at Unitarian Universalist Church of Los Alamos is more than just an opportunity to make a few bucks or score some great items at bargain prices.

    It is a chance to socialize with the community and spread awareness about the church.

    “We’re an active church that wants to do more outreach,” said Robyn Schultz, parking lot sales coordinator. “It’s a good reason for people to clean out their houses.”

    “It’s a great community building activity,” she added.

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  • Summer is  winding down, school is starting up and the transition from summer to fall is beginning. Despite the changes in the air, the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series is still bringing music to the last few weeks of summer.

    Even though it is a time of change, it is still worth celebrating.

    Take The Derailers, for instance. When they come to town for their concert at 7 p.m. Friday at Smith’s Food and Drug parking lot in Los Alamos, it is the roasted chiles and the cool temperatures that this Austin, Texas-based band is eager to experience.

  • What’s new at Dance Arts Los Alamos? Just about everything! DALA has enlarged its studio space in Los Alamos, expanded class offerings in both Los Alamos and White Rock, given a face-lift to the White Rock studio and appointed two new directors to the staff.

  • I  write to you amid decibel levels rarely experienced in 21st-century American dining rooms, especially those with neutral color schemes.

    Because of the riot underfoot, I can barely hear “Mr. Tambourine Man.” Maybe I shouldn’t be listening to this music anyhow. I hear it belongs to my parents. But that is not the cause of this riot, nor very many others.

    This started because of an animal you could store in a peanut-butter jar.

  • Time traveling always looks so great, or at least what is revealed in movies. “The Time Machine” offered a view of a very distant future, “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” showcased awesome historical events and the little boy in Disney’s “The Navigator” got to fly around on a really cool looking space ship.

  • On July 24, teens from Los Alamos, Española and Pojoaque gathered at Northern New Mexico College El Rito Campus for the Joining and Understanding Now, Teens Overcome Separation (JUNTOS) annual youth summit.

    The purpose of the summit was to discuss a plan of action for JUNTOS’ involvement in the 2009-2010 school year.

    Many issues were addressed at the summit including what JUNTOS hopes to accomplish this year as well as how to become better recognized in the communities.

  • Ellen Kress, a 2009 Los Alamos High School graduate, has always had a knack for being on the stage. She helped run the Olions this year and took part in several productions. On Wednesday, Kress is going a step higher than just limelight. She is reaching for the crown.

    Kress will carry the title of Miss New Mexico in the Miss National U.S. Scholarship Pageant. The competition will be held Friday in New Orleans. Miss National U.S. is a new organization; it was established in 2007.

  • Pain can serve as shackles. People feel imprisoned by it because their extreme discomfort prevents from them doing whatever they wish. Eventually, some may turn to the doctor’s office for a prescription to break those invisible shackles.

    A presentation titled, “Your Pain: How to Tell Your Story,” will help Los Alamos residents free themselves from pain.

  • This week we take a look at assets in your every day life. A majority of what we look at through the assets lens is focused at youth and how to make this a wonderful community for them.

    Today, I want you to consider the scenario of Assets in your daily life, with our focus on the work place, the employee lounge, the boardroom, cafeteria or even your desk. Then I want you to think about where you eat lunch?

  • My camera has taken me to some pretty great experiences in the past years and this last weekend was no exception. Aug. 8-9, I had the privilege of perching my cowgirl boots in the Crow’s Nest, high above the rodeo at Brewer Arena. The Crow’s Nest is the announcer’s stand above the bucking chute opposite the grand stand.

    The county sponsors the rodeo with assistance from the Pony Club and Krystal Zellner, a county employee.

  • The new Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church is 100 percent homemade.

    Parishioners had a hand in everything from landscaping to the actual construction of the new hall.

    The result is not only a new, expansive, addition to the church but also a testament of what team work and a little faith can accomplish.

    The project started in 2007 and it should be entirely completed by the grand opening, which is scheduled for Aug. 29.

  • The New Deal era was a “very pivotal time for our state,” said Hedy Dunn, director of the Los Alamos Historical Society. There were political aspects that contributed to the era’s importance but also cultural aspects as well.

  • When Mondays come around some people might groan. On this day, the relaxing and fun times of the weekend ends and the workweek begins.

    For me, Mondays mean something different. Being in the newspaper business means my schedule is never the normal the 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday workweek.

    To get the Sunday paper out, the staff works Saturdays. Sometimes it feels a little depressing knowing while everyone is out hiking on mountain trails or browsing through stores in a shopping plaza, I am punching keys on a keyboard.

  • When Devon Allman’s Honey Tribe comes to town, expect all plans and scripts to be crumpled up and thrown away in favor of an off-script and off-the-cuff performance.

    This spontaneity will be featured in an old-school blues and rock n’ roll concert, which will be held at 7 p.m. Friday at the Best Western Hilltop House.

    The concert is part of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert series.

    “They (Los Alamos residents) can expect absolute mayhem,” Allman joked.

  • Some of the dances date back to the 17th century and originates from places including New England and the British Aisles. Despite old age and far-away birthplaces, contra dances’ effect on people has not diminished. Once the fiddlers, guitarists, pianist and other musicians begin to play, toes are guaranteed to start tapping and people will run to the dance floor.  

    See for yourself at the upcoming Los Alamos Contra Dance, which starts at 6:30 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage St.

  • New Mexico’s economy is in a weakened state. There’s been job cutting, hatches have been battened and belts have been made tighter. Although it may feel unexpected and surprising, a sour economy has visited the state before.

    David Kammer, through the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities, will discuss this historical period during his lecture, “New Mexico’s New Deal: A 75th Anniversary Perspective,” at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge. The talk is part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s lecture series.

  • The Los Alamos Coffeehouse was a tradition for years. When the concert series came to a close in 2008, music fans across the county collectively sighed in a minor key and when violinist Kay Newnam and the Los Alamos Arts Council announced the return of the Coffeehouse for a special, one-time event, it was like the moment when a favorite musical theme makes its comeback in a long, challenging composition.

  • Exhibits ranging from finely sewn quilts to vegetable baskets were exhibited during the County Fair.  The entries were displayed at Mesa Public Library.

  • As missionaries through the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church, Sister Ormsby and Sister Jensen are reaching out in an attempt to form a bond with the local community. Their tool to create ties between themselves and Los Alamos is music.

    Ormsby and Jensen will present a devotional set to music titled, “The Restoration,” at 6 p.m. Sunday at the Los Alamos Ward of the LDS church.

    “Basically it’s going to be explaining in music how our religion came about,” Ormsby said.