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Features

  • Cool off from the summer heat by diving into the literary world at the Los Alamos County Library System. This summer’s reading program is titled, “Make A Splash @ Your Library.”

    The 2010 Summer Reading Program is open to young people, birth through young adult, with programs, prize drawings, special events, story hours, a reading club and more. Even families are invited to participate in some programs. Also, there are special programs just for teens.

  • I’m so close to the end, and yet there’s still nothing I can do but wait. Oh, I can pre-wash the cloth diapers and drink my uterus-strengthening tea. I can swim the world’s slowest 800 meters and blend healthy strawberry-banana smoothies. I can bump into counters. But mostly, I wait.

    I feel like I’ve been waiting since way back in October when I saw two lines on a little stick instead of one.

  • EDITOR’S NOTE:  For  the remainder of the 2010 Los Alamos Summer Concert Series, Organizer Russ Gordon will submit a weekly column to share information and insight   about the performers.

    At 7 p.m. Friday, the Los Alamos county Summer Concert Series and its sponsors present soulful blues diva Candye Kane.

    The incredible blues and gospel singer/songwriter Thomas Dorsey said, “the blues is a good woman feeling bad.”

  • Initially, Paula Dean said she faced her new position as assistant superintendent with some anxiety. But that anxiety has transformed into excitement.

    "I am very excited," she said. "I have moved incrementally from anxiety to full-blown excitement. I think it's going to be a challenge and I love it - I love a challenge."

    Dean, the former principal of Barranca Elementary School, will officially become assistant superintendent July 1. Former Assistant Superintendent Kate Thomas retired this year.

    Read more in the Monitor.

     

  • There are unsung heroes in every community. Their contributions are critical but sometimes escape the public’s attention.

    Librarians could fall into the category of unsung hero, but perhaps that should be corrected.

    With Angie Manfredi, head of youth services for Los Alamos County Library System, participating in the Young Adult Library Service Association (YALSA) annual conference and the Library Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C., people could be paying librarians a lot more attention, at least in Los Alamos.

  • Similar to a hardy perennial, ChamberFest faithfully takes bloom every summer in the Los Alamos community.

    It is a tradition that has sunk its roots into the town but the event also receives a lot of nurture and care from the community to allow it to flourish.

    For instance, over the years the event has seen several popular additions including a bubble pit and two car shows.

    Furthermore, this year the cuisine that will be for sale will expand from the normal hamburgers and hotdogs to traditional New Mexican fare.

  • Among the participants in this year’s American Legion’s New Mexico Boys State, Daniel Roybal represented Los Alamos.

    Boys State officially kicked off May 30 and concluded Friday at Eastern New Mexico University in Portales.

    It is the 63rd annual New Mexico Boys State session.

    The delegates consisted of high school upcoming seniors who prepared for a week of establishing their own state government, reflecting on real democracy in action and learning the importance of civic engagement.

  • Maureen Mahoney-Barraclough, director of Aid For Africa, gave a presentation about her experiences with families and orphans affected by HIV/AIDS in South Africa and Uganda to Los Alamos High School teacher Allen Andraski’s history and human geography classes. The students raised funds to donate to Aid For Africa to help support those children.  In response to their efforts, Los Alamos National Bank provided an additional contribution to Aid For Africa. One hundred percent of the donated funds go directly to the children’s schools and orphan centers in Uganda.

  • Members of the White Rock Baptist Church are hosting a vacation Bible school this summer, but unlike other programs, this one will not be held down the street. A team of 20 people will travel to the edge of Chihuahua, Mexico and venture to the isolated community in the Sierra Tarahumara.

    The goal is to impact residents’ lives – both in lifestyle and in spirituality.

    Beverly Basey-Jones and her husband have traveled to the Sierra Tarahumara several that times in the past. This will be their third year.

  • At 2 p.m. June 13, Fuller Lodge again will resonate with music when eight recipients of the Deborah Beene Memorial Music Scholarships during the last 10 years will perform a variety of musical offerings for the public. Admission is free.

    The concert will feature two winners of this year’s competition – pianist David Li, who won first prize, and violinist Jin Park, who won third prize.

    The recipient of the second prize was clarinetist Shannon Burns. In last year’s competition, Park’s performance as a pianist garnered him a share of the top prize.

  • Parenting has got to be the toughest job in the world. It’s a career that doesn’t come with training sessions or an instructional manual. Plus, there is a lot of responsibility placed on a parent’s shoulders.

    The good news is parents are not alone. Help is available.

    From 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdays, starting this week and running through July 1, Family Strengths Network is offering a class titled, “Ages of Discovery.”

    Jennifer Moss, an expert in early childhood development, will instruct the class.

  • If you ever want to see proof of Los Alamos’ creativity, just take a look at the entries for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life’s birdhouse silent auction.

    There are rocket shaped houses, houses made out of game pieces, houses decorated with computer components, houses drenched in feathers, houses carved out of gourds and houses molded to look like faces.

    Local artists have seized plain, unassuming wooden birdhouses purchased from Michaels, the craft store, and allowed their imagination and creativity to take flight.

  • The winners of the 2010 Young Writers Contest were announced at a breakfast ceremony Saturday at Daylight Delights restaurant.

    Daylight Delights and the Los Alamos Writers Group sponsored the contest and ceremony.

    Winners received cash, Chamber Bucks, Daylight Delights gift cards and ribbons.

    The winners in the four divisions were:

    • High school: First place, Elizabeth Turner; second place, Natalie Swinhoe.

    • Middle school: First place, Sarah Wallstrom; second place, Emma Schmidt; third place, Ethan Clements

  • Up through last week, my mother had reminded everyone in the family just how many days of school remained in the 2009-2010 year. When Sunday rolled around, she sang out to everyone that she did not have to work this week.

    If you think students are the only ones who excitedly cross the days off the calendar, think again. A vacation is a vacation – no matter one’s age.

    And with the conclusion of one school year and the beginning of a tranquil break, it seemed a celebration was in order.

  • Musician Eric Sardinas has a signature style that listeners seldom hear – especially those who live in Northern New Mexico.

    The Los Alamos Summer Concert Series, however, is bringing the sounds of Deep South to the Southwest.

    Eric Sardinas and Big Motor will perform at 7 p.m. Friday at the Holiday Inn Express located in the Entrada Business Park.

    According to Sardinas Web site, Sardinas was exposed to gospel, Motown and R&B, all of which pushed him to the acoustic sounds of the Deep South.

  • National Merit Finalists

    Kathy Lin, Emma Carroll, Shaina Riciputi, Jaime Resnick, Dov Shlachter, Kendra Smale

    Local Scholarship Awards

    Angelo Montoya Memorial Scholarship    • James Larkin

    Aspen School PTO Scholarship    

    • Hannah Taylor and Brooke Maxwell

    Cerro Grande            • Meghan Maes

    Chamisa School PTO Scholarship     

    • Sarah Story      

  • Director David Von Ancken’s “Seraphim Falls” has all the basic elements: horses, cowboy hats, guns, railroads, bank robbers, desert landscapes, tight-lipped conversation. The film is almost entirely peopled by men, everyone drinks out of leather canteens and nobody can trust anybody not to try to kill him.

  • The 2010-2011 Los Alamos Concert Association season opens with Julie Albers, cellist and Orion Weiss, pianist, at 4 p.m. Oct. 17. Albers studied at the Cleveland Institute of Music and won the Grand Prize at the XIII International Competition for Young Musicians in Douai, France.

  • The Friends of Mesa Public Library (FMPL) members welcomed five seniors and their families to the spring member luncheon  May 19.

    FMPL members also announced the upcoming awards through the Friends of Mesa Public Library Scholarship and the June Ettinger Memorial Scholarship. Scholarship winners have written a personal narrative about a fiction or non-fiction book that has become important to the understanding of themselves or the human condition.

  • “The Cowboys” is a bit like “Little House on the Prairie” meets “The Patriot.”

    Instead of Michael Landon or Mel Gibson, imagine an awkwardly paternal John Wayne. Rather than the complacency of Walnut Grove or the sadism of the Revolutionary War, picture New Mexico in the Old West – a hard life of herding cattle and breaking horses, and young men looking for an easier way. Ranch hands were heading toward the rivers, planning to find lots of gold and retire early.