Astronomy Show from 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore our universe from the comfort of the planetarium. Cost is $6 per adult and $4 per child.
    Feature Film: “Sea Monsters, A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. See prehistoric sea creatures come to life, and follow fossil hunters to remote locations as they excavate the remains of some of the most awe-inspiring creatures of all time. Cost is $6 for adults and $4 for children.
    Feature Film: “Sea Monsters, A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults and $4 for children.

    Dances of India Valentines Day performance from 3-3:30 p.m. at Sombrillo Nursing Home.

    Dances of India Valentines Day performance from 3:45-4:15 p.m. at Aspen Ridge Lodge.

    Afternoon at Downton Abbey tea from 2-4 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The tea’s theme will be Valentine’s Day, and we put it into a 1925 setting. Performances by LAHS ballroom dance class and Lads of Enchantment Barbershop Group. Costumes encouraged! All ages welcome at this fundraising event. Tickets, priced at $10 for children 12 and under, and $20 for adults, are available at senior center.

  • Tonight some things I say may surprise you, some may upset you and some may enlighten you.
    The easiest place for kids to get beer, is right next to the milk. It was a campaign slogan from an organization called FACE that we used in the community about 15 years ago. It made some parents down right irate, that we were teaching their kids where to get beer.
    I remember thinking, “Oh hon, if you think I’m the first one that brought it to their attention, we’ve got a lot more to worry about.”
    Recently I was made aware of a YouTube post called, “Being 13.” It was a glimpse at social media and access from the perspective of this generation. I watched it in utter fascination and I didn’t have a clue!
    The teenagers were checking their Facebook updates 100 times a day. I don’t do anything one hundred times a day. If my body didn’t blink and breathe without a Post-it note to remind me, I’d be dead for sure.
    Parents, I hate to tell you this, but we have no idea what it is like to be a teenager today. I say this knowing that I have three and that I work with hundreds of them.
    Many teens today are so worried about what is going on, being said and taking place that they can’t stop checking to make sure they aren’t missing out.

  • The Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum is holding a winter series on the topic “What Makes Us Human?” on Feb. 16.
    The group meets at Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church on the third Tuesday of the month. A video/presentation begins at 6 p.m. group discussion at 6:30 p.m.

  • Sue Watts was the Spirit of the West winner, named for former County Councilor Jim West at the 2016 Community Assets Awards.
    The event hosted by the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation and Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA).
    West was nominated by Becky Shankland for her service to benefit the community through volunteer efforts at PEEC.
    Watch the Los Alamos Monitor for more winners later this week.

  • The LAPS School Board congratulated Piñon Elementary School student Leeson Weaver this week.
    Leeson won the northern New Mexico MATHCOUNTS Chapter Meet as the highest-scoring individual student on the written test. He also came in second in the Countdown Round, which included Jeopardy-style buzzers and a 45-seconds-per-question situation, in a bracketed single elimination format.
    Piñon’s all-girl team came in second, behind Los Alamos Middle School, in the team competition. The team included Jennie Gao, Lily Shevitz, Kira Lorenc, Lizzie Massa and Izze Thomas. The Los Alamos students plan to attend the state meet at Albuquerque Academy on March 19.
    Los Alamos Middle School was first place, Piñon Elementary was second and Barranca Mesa Elementary placed third.
    Mountain, Aspen, and Chamisa were also represented for 100 percent representation by eligible Los Alamos Public Schools.
    MATHCOUNTS is a national math competition. In New Mexico, regional competitions occur in February with the top competitors moving on to the statewide competition and then on to the national finals.

  • Feb. 7-14, 2016
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart

    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Beer Battered Cod
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken Enchilada
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45  a.m.        Cardio Plus Exercise
    10:15 a.m.        Music with Ruth    

  • Steve McKee, President and CEO of McKee Wallwork & Company, will be the speaker at the Wednesday's Chamber Business Breakfast. The topic will be One of Our 50 is Missing: Procurement, REAL ID and GRT. Getting New Mexico on a level playing field.
    The Chamber Breakfast will be 7:30-9 a.m. Wednesday in room 230, building 2, UNM-LA, 4000 University Drive.
    McKee is a leading brand strategist with nearly three decades of experience. He authored the books "When Growth Stalls" and "Power Branding," as well as a long-running marketing column in BusinessWeek.com.
    Breakfast will be catered by Daniel’s Cafe. Prospective members should contact the Chamber to be registered for the event. Chamber Members can register for the breakfast on the Chamber website losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com/events/or by emailing nancy@losalamos.org.

  • Back on Feb. 11, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill authorizing the establishment of a beautiful but little-known park, Bandelier National Monument. It is rich in archeological sites and dramatic landscapes.
    Thursday is the one hundredth anniversary of that event, and the park is planning special events throughout the year to celebrate.
    “It is our honor and privilege to be stewards for Bandelier National Monument," said Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott . "The staff take great pride in preserving and protecting the monument’s extraordinary resources, and we’re all looking forward to providing a range of exceptional experiences during Bandelier’s Centennial year.”
    Also, 2016 is also the centennial of the National Park Service, created on Aug. 25 of the same year. So there will be centennial celebrations at the other 408 National Park Service areas throughout the country.  
    On Thursday, the park’s birthday, members of the park staff will be giving out cupcakes to local shoppers at the Smith’s store in Los Alamos.
    The Friends of Bandelier, the organization of private citizens who love and provide support for the park, will also be there.

  • Diabetes mellitus, also called sugar diabetes, is becoming more prevalent in today’s society. Like humans, dogs can develop diabetes and may need medical care throughout their lifetime to manage the disease.
    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by a lack or relative deficiency of a hormone called insulin. This hormone is produced by the pancreas and is needed to store energy from food and to use glucose for fuel. Dr. Audrey Cook, associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how an insulin deficiency can negatively affect a dog’s health.
    “In people, the two most common forms of diabetes are Type 1 and Type 2,” she said. “Type 1 diabetics do not make insulin at all and will need insulin injections for life. This is typically the type of diabetes that we see in dogs. In some cases, chronic inflammation of the pancreas—called pancreatitis—can gradually destroy cells that produce insulin in canines, resulting in diabetes. On rare occasions, we even see dogs that become transiently diabetic following a heat cycle. This is called diestrus diabetes.”

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating. You can also check out our Petfinder website for pictures of our adorable adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    Fluffy—One cool cat! This 6-month-old male tabby was surrendered with his sibling Stripes. Fluffy can play all day long, but when he’s done playing, he’s ready for some snuggles! Fluffy is confident and fun, and he would light up any home. Fluffy is very friendly with other fun-loving cats, and he would likely do best in a home with another cat (or even a dog) to keep him company.

  • WOW – February and the month known for love.
    This month, I am asking you to show your love for youth with a fun fundraising idea for our local non-profit 501-C-3, Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA). C’YA became official after writing the 100 Best Communities for Young People grant for Los Alamos with our official non-profit status recognition in June of 2014.
    I had an idea based on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, but cheaper, easier and a whole lot sweeter.
    The idea is for you to bake a plate of cookies for anyone or donate $5 to Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA). We have an account with Los Alamos National Bank or donations can be sent to 77 Isleta Drive in Los Alamos.
    We plan to use the funds specifically to recognize youth in a small but meaningful way throughout the year. The idea gained a hold after no youth were recognized for the 2015 Community Asset Awards, the seventh year we will host the awards.
    We plan to do the Cookie Plate Challenge throughout February and then launch a youth winner in March, and follow that with a monthly recognition all year long. We plan to do it throughout the year and still include youth in the Community Asset Awards done at this time each year.

  • The public is invited to the opening reception for a new exhibit at Mesa Public Library, to be held 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda. The exhibit is entitled “West and East: Just for the Beauty of It.” The artists are SuFong Milonni and Barbara Yarnell. Both artists work in the medium of clay. The show will be in the gallery through Feb. 28.
    Yarnell was born in Los Alamos. Milonni was born and grew up in An-tung China in the northeastern part of China.
    “We met and have worked together at UNM-Los Alamos clay studio for over 10 years,” Yarnell said. “For this show, we went back to our original backgrounds for inspiration.”
    In this show Milonni’s works are in the oriental tradition and Yarnell’s are flavored by the southwest. Yarnell’s work is inspired by the mesas and enchanted sky of northern New Mexico, while Mei-li’s work is in the ancient tradition of Chinese celadon glazing.
    Yarnell’s work is fired in an electric kiln to a mid-range stoneware temperature. Milonni’s work is fired in a gas kiln to a higher stoneware/porcelain temperature.   

  • Need a healthy cry? Catch “In America” (2002, rated PG-13) at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Mesa Public Library for a guaranteed catharsis.
    When the film opens, Johnny and Sarah Sullivan (Paddy Considine and Samantha Morton) are trying to immigrate into the United States, possibly hoping to outrun the death, about one year earlier, of their son Frankie.
    They and their two living children, 10-year-old Christy (Sarah Bolger) and 5-year-old Ariel (Emma Bolger), move into a tenement in New York City, a home to many drug addicts and one tenant described to the Sullivans as “the man who screams.” They appear to be the only family with young children in the building.
    Johnny, an actor, is often unemployed, but Sarah takes a job as a waitress at a local ice-cream shop and they scrape by. They make a friend in the building (the totally fantastic Djimon Hounsou) and embrace their new life as much as they can. However, they can’t put off grieving forever.
    Thoughtful, honest storytelling from writer/director Jim Sheridan makes “In America” the kind of film is hard to forget, in part because the story asks a lot of its viewers. This is not entertainment so much as a lesson in empathy, one that we might not want but can always use.

  • Jan. 9 — A girl. Aubrianna Padilla. Born to Marlene Martinez and Joshua Padilla.
    Jan. 15 — A girl. Kady Lynne King. Born to Elanda and Alexander King.
    Jan. 15 — A girl. Ava Catherine Wood. Born to Elizabeth and Brandon Wood.
    Jan. 18 — A boy. Donovan Joseph Salazar. Born to Destiny Velasquez and Derek Salazar.
    Jan. 20 — A girl. Aurora Rose Wong. Born to Charissa and Andrew Wong.
    Jan. 21 — A girl. Madeline Rose Martinez. Born to Alisha and Michael Martinez.
    Jan. 23 — A boy. Mason Ezra Rodriquez. Born to Vanessa Rodriquez.

  • Feb. 9  is Family Night at the Los Alamos Nature Center. Learn about geology through stories and music with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey from 6-7 p.m. The nature center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.
    This program is free to attend thanks to a generous sponsorship from Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos.
    For more information about this and other programs offered by PEEC at the Nature Center, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Café Scientifique, New Mexico’s portion of the Teen Science Café Network, is gearing up for a two-part series of cafés about Mars. The first café, which will take place in Los Alamos at the YMCA Teen Center at 7 p.m. Tuesday and in Taos, at the Mural Room of the old county courthouse on Feb. 23 will be presented on Human Landing sites on Mars.
    Suzi Montaño and Steve Johnstone from Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Space Data Science and Systems Group (ISR-3)will present on the state of manned missions to Mars, and how close to a reality colonizing Mars has become. Teens will have a chance to review the criteria for landing sites and make recommendations to the LANL/NASA team.
    For more information and directions, visit Cafenm.org/schedule.html and for questions please contact RJ Montaño at RJ@scieds.com.

  • Feb. 1-6, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart

    8:30 a.m.    Tax Preparation
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion Group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Baked Potato Bar
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.         Ballroom Dancing
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Meatloaf
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.         Cardio Plus Exercise

    Feature Film: “Sea Monsters, A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. See prehistoric sea creatures come to life and follow fossil hunters to remote locations as they excavate the remains of some of the most awe-inspiring creatures of all time. Suitable for ages 4 and up. $6 per adult, $4 per child.
    Nature Playtimes from 10-11 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join local families for fun in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.
    LRG First Tuesday Breakfast. Lab retirees are invited to join the Laboratory Retiree Group for breakfast on the first Tuesday of each month from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Morning Glory Restaurant, 1377 Diamond Drive, Los Alamos (across from the high school). Morning Glory serves a full breakfast and pastries. LRG will pay for hot coffee or tea. Contact sgirard@losalamos.com for more information.

    Tales of Trails in the Bandelier Backcountry at 7 p.m. Discover the best ways to explore the Bandelier backcountry. Free.

    Kiwanis meeting from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. Rick Reiss, new chairman of the Los Alamos County Council, will give Kiwanis a preview of the council’s activities in 2016.


  • A Brown Bag performance honoring Black History Month Wednesday will combine music and poetry. The event will feature poet and teacher Dr. Doris Fields and Los Alamos pianist Rheta Moazzami.
    The public is invited to the event that starts at noon at Fuller Lodge
    The two women collaborated after meeting in Santa Fe at a National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).
    Moazzami will play her own composition, "Selma," written in honor of the 50th anniversary in 2015 of the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, which cost lives in the cause of getting the vote for African American people. At the end of the march, 25,000 people from all over the United States had joined the marchers. Now, 50 years later, people are still trying to keep people of color from voting.
    “‘Selma was very well received at the UNM-LA concert last year," Moazzami said.
    Also, Moazzami will play three compositions of Samuel Coleridge Taylor, a prolific Anglo-African classical composer at the turn of the century. “United States audiences are not familiar with his music," Moazzami said.

  • Like humans, it is normal for dogs to experience the occasional upset stomach, or episode of diarrhea, but experiencing severe symptoms, such as bloody stools, may be a sign of something more serious.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) refers to a group of gastrointestinal diseases that result in the inflammation of the intestines. The exact cause of IBD in dogs is unknown, but bacteria and nutrients normally found in the intestine are thought to be the cause of the abnormal immune response that causes inflammation.
    Dr. Jonathan Lidbury, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained IBD’s potential causes. “IBD is a syndrome that is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation in dogs,” Lidbury said. “The cause of IBD in dogs is not fully known, but recent research has provided some important clues. Basically, there is a loss of tolerance in the dog’s intestinal immune system to the nutrients or bacteria that are normally found in the bowel. This leads to inflammation of the intestines.”
    Common signs of IBD in dogs include excessive diarrhea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Dog owners may also notice rumbling sounds in the abdominal cavity, flatulence, and even bloody stools in dogs with IBD.