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Features

  • Watching the first moments of the New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company’s production of “The Sleeping Beauty” on a cold February night gave me the same feeling I experience when I notice spring bulbs poking through the snow and frozen ground. It’s a giddiness that something great is on its way. The gray and gloom of winter is dwindling.

    Likewise, NMDT-PC’s “The Sleeping Beauty” offers all the sparkle, color and sweetness to escape a gray day.

  • Saturday night’s performance of “Parted Waters” at Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe was a treat for the mind, heart and soul.  

    Local playwright Robert Benjamin’s drama of a New Mexican family grappling with their Judaic roots presents a credible snapshot of how three generations of Hispanic men come to different terms with their ancestry.  

    On yet another level, the play suggests the crucial need for acceptance and respect for cultural differences among all people.

  • I wish I had. I regret not. Why didn’t I?

    I’m not old yet, but I know lots of sentences that start like that. They tend to revolve around high school. I wish I had spent more time thinking about what I wanted, instead of what other people might want. I regret not telling people who I was or what mattered to me. All I ever said was a bunch of crap.

  • Local photographer Jim O’Donnell recently visited the wildlife refuge Bosque del Apache and took photographs of a few feathered inhabitants. These artistic shots included a Great Blue Heron, Red Tail Hawk and Snow geese.

  • Persistence can pay off. Barranca Elementary School fourth-grader Cameron Harlow can attest to that statement.

    When a casting call for the movie, “Brothers,” was posted, Harlow’s mother, Linda, took him and his brother to audition for the movie. However, the casting director Marty Cherrix told Harlow he wasn’t needed.

    It wasn’t the last time Harlow would hear from Cherrix. Later, Cherrix contacted the aspiring actor to see if he would be interested in auditioning for another movie being filmed in New Mexico.

  • Ariel Chen won first place and Kevin Gao earned third place in the Jackie McGehee Piano Concerto Competition held Saturday at Keller Hall in Albuquerque.  Read more in tomorrow's Monitor.

  • Don’t be fooled by their age. Ariel Chen and Kevin Gao may just be 14-years-old but they possess a lot of professionalism and maturity, especially while seated at the piano.

    Their talents were revealed during the Jackie McGehee Piano Concerto Competition, which was held Saturday at Keller Hall in Albuquerque.

  • There is an old children’s doggerel verse that goes something like this, “Spring has sprung; the grass is riz, I wonder where the birdies is!”  With the winter weather still upon us this humorous verse is apropos. To overcome any snow fatigue, the Art Center at Fuller Lodge has an antidote. From 5-7 p.m. Friday, an exhibit opens titled, “Let’s Celebrate Spring.” The show lives up to its name with a riot of color and flowers.

  • The American Junior Academy of Science (AJAS) choose Los Alamos high school student Ryan Erickson to attend the AJAS meeting in San Diego.The AJAS is America’s only honor research society for high school scientists.

    Each year, AJAS hosts a conference, held in conjunction with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), to honor these students and induct them as fellows into AJAS.

    Erickson won this honor in a statewide scientific paper competition by writing and orally presenting the best paper.

  • This week as we look at the asset that defines using youth as resources. The local data shows that 31 percent of youth in our community feel so inclined.

    Assets In Action is working in conjunction with the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and other community groups to provide youth a voice for input to their meetings.

    If you have a youth willing to fill such a role, give me a call or drop me an e-mail. It will be my goal to get input from a variety of students. If you have a youth who is willing to e-mail me, text me, or fill out a form, that would be great.

  • Beat the wintertime blues by heading over to the Art Center at Fuller Lodge. The center will open its newest exhibit, “Let’s Celebrate Spring,” Friday. Read more in Sunday’s Monitor.

  • The Los Alamos Community Winds ensemble is offering a musical mixture during its upcoming concert. The audience’s ears will immediately pick up tried-and-true pieces such as Igor Stravinsky’s score for the ballet, “The Firebird,” and Tchaikowsky’s 1812 Overture. But other works such as March to the Scaffold from “Symphonie Fantastique” and Emperata Overture may offer a new listening experience to attendees.

  • Join the Los Alamos Mountaineers at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in Fuller Lodge to hear Lynn Ensslin and Dennis Brandt share their adventures on the Ptarmigan Traverse in the Northern Cascades.

    According to many Washington State alpinists, the Ptarmigan Traverse is the classic alpine traverse in Washington.

    It is unique in that it requires a week-long commitment on an off-trail route, which weaves its way between the glaciated peaks of the North Cascades. It is a route that one should try only if they have climbing and glacier experience.

  •  Heat up the griddle and mix up the batter, Trinity on the Hill and House of Hope prepares for the Shrove pancake supper. Read more in today's paper.

  • Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and the House of Hope (HoH) Women will commemorate Shrove Tuesday by hosting a pancake supper from 5:30-7 p.m. in the new Kelly Hall. Donations for the dinner are $4 for children age 10 and younger, $7 for adults and $18 for families.

    Tickets may be purchased at the door the night of the supper.

  • Patricia Lena Stan was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for January.

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one outstanding student of the current Los Alamos High School graduating class to honor each month.

    Students are selected on the basis of academic success, extracurricular involvement and service to the community.  

    Along with her parents, Marius and Liliana, Stan chose Janna Warren, her piano teacher of six years, to join her in accepting this honor.

  • The video, “Uncommon Valor: The Battle of Iwo Jima,” as well as first hand-account of the battle by local Iwo Jima Marine Corp veteran, Bill Hudson, will be presented to the community at 7 p.m. Feb. 17 at Mesa Public Library, upstairs in the library meeting rooms.

    “Uncommon Valor: The Battle of Iwo Jima,” was produced by the Canadian History Channel and has not been publicly aired in the U.S. This showing will commemorate the 65th anniversary of that historic battle.

  • Teatro Paraguas, located at 3221-B Richards Lane in Santa Fe, will present local playwright Robert Benjamin’s “Parted Waters,” beginning today and running through Feb. 27. There will be a total of 11 performances.

    Three Hispanic men including the grandfather, son and grandson are the focus in the play.

    The family owns a farm near Truchas, which has been in the family for generations.

  • When I was in middle school a friend of mine, who lived across the street, once commented that she could eat whatever she wanted and not gain a pound.

    I was engulfed in jealousy when I heard this – how could it be so easy for some people to maintain a tiny physique when others are faced with a lifelong, seemingly impossible challenge to get thin? I’ve tried to convince myself that I am like my middle school friend; however, no matter how hard I twist the facts, the truth is I am not a part of the same group.

  • Los Alamos Visiting Nurses are offering the community bunches of sunshine.

    This gift is available through the 15th Annual Daffodils for Hospice fundraiser.

    The sun-colored flowers are shipped from California in enormous boxes. When they arrive in Los Alamos, hospice workers bunch the flowers and they are stored in a space donated by the Netuschils before and during the sale.

    The flowers serve as a fundraiser for the organization.