.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Teen chefs unveiled their restaurant concepts and created tantalizing dishes at the New Mexico ProStart Invitational, hosted by Ben E. Keith Foods at the Albuquerque Convention Center in the Northeast Exhibit Hall today.
    Fifteen New Mexico high school culinary and management teams vied for scholarships and the opportunity to represent the state at the National ProStart Invitational in Baltimore, Md.
    The ProStart Invitational consisted of two competitions: culinary and management. Teams that participated in the culinary competition demonstrated their creative abilities through the preparation of a three-course gourmet meal in 60 minutes.

  • The Los Alamos Middle School Green Team celebrated the school board’s approval of an agreement for a community garden and greenhouse. The Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and the Family YMCA oversee the Los Alamos Youth Food Project, which is sponsored by a grant from the State Farm Youth Advisory Board.

  • Assets 30 and 31 top the list week as we look at responsibility and restraint.
    These may be two very perfect assets to look at just prior to spring break.
    First of all, you must show restraint in not eating all of the Girl Scout cookies that you purchase.
    It is however, the responsible thing to do, to buy the rest of these Girls Scout cookies while shopping at Smith’s, and get these young ladies back to their normal activities.
    Several times during the last week, I’ve had conversations with other parents about the need to let kids experience things in life, that later make them responsible adults.
    Sometimes you have to give kids the keys to the castle and see what they will do with them.

  • The Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and Assets in Action Cookies and Conversation event is held twice a month, on Monday. The program unites local senior citizens and students for lunch and conversation. Those wishing to volunteer or donate cookies for the event can call 661-4846.

  • Parents that have students in the Los Alamos Public Schools are invited to take the 2011-2012 Quality of Education Survey. The survey allows school districts and the Public Education Department to obtain input from parents for continuous improvement and to better educate students.
    To participate in the survey visit, 164.64.166.19/studentsurvey/SurveyFrame.asp, then go to the left side of the screen and click on the link, “Take a Survey.” Follow the directions and take the survey provided for your student(s) school(s).
    Hard copies of the survey will be provided at LAPS schools or may be obtained from the receptionist at the Los Alamos Public Schools Administration office. The survey will be active until May 1.
     

  • Chamisa third and fourth graders performed the annual musical revue, focusing on Los Alamos history, before a packed audience March 15.
    Beginning with the first inhabitants, the ancient pueblo people, the program progressed forward in time featuring the conquistadores, the Hispanic settlers, the Santa Fe Trail and the Ranch School Boys.  
    Gen. Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer took the stage with solos, as the workers, wives, children and the soldiers from the World War II era sang about their place on the Hill.
    Oppy and Groves sang about knowing “The World Would Never Be the Same Again.”  
    The musical ended with the workers of today’s Hill, celebrating the discoveries, technologies and missions of present-day.

  • Rotary says thanks

    On behalf of the Rotary Club of Los Alamos, I would like to thank the community for its outstanding support of our third annual Crab Fest recently at Central Avenue Grill.  
    With the money raised, we will once again be able to give academic and vocational awards to high school students and we will begin construction this summer of the new memorial garden at Los Alamos High School, replacing the original, which was demolished during construction of the new buildings.

  • The Family YMCA is taking registrations for the March 31 First Aid, Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) certification course. Classes are generally the first Saturday of each month and are taught by American Red Cross certified instructors.  They also offer Red Cross classes in babysitting and infant/child CPR.
    Participants age 13 and older that complete the course will receive American Red Cross certification. There is a maximum of 12 participants for each class.
    The class will be from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at the Y, March 31  and is open to the public. The cost is $80 for YMCA members and $110 for program members. The certificates are good for two years.    

  • Posse Shack breakfast from 7-11 a.m. April 1 to benefit Friends of the Shelter, 650 North Mesa Road.
    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Others are currently off-site in foster homes. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    Also check out the Petfinder page at petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.

    DOGS

  • The competition for the 2012 Dog Jog Logo Contest was tough, but after sorting through what was thought to be the most entries seen in years, one submission stood out.
    Kaylee Rogers, a fourth grader at Barranca Elementary School created the winning design for the 2012 Dog Jog Logo contest.
    Rogers said she entered the contest because she likes to draw and thought it would be fun to enter, but was inspired by her dog Penny.
    Rogers and her family adopted Penny from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter more than a year ago. In addition to her interest in drawing, Rogers also like arts, music and baton twirling.

  • After many hours of practicing, nine young, aspiring Los Alamos pianists were prize winners in the annual Santa Fe Sonata Contest Feb. 4 in Santa Fe.
    Students competed among a total of 40 contestants for their trophy awards. Overall, the contest has 10 levels of required compositions, with each student within a level performing the same work. A panel of three judges from Las Cruces, Albuquerque and San Francisco were the adjudicators. Along with others from Los Alamos, contestants from Santa Fe, Las Vegas, El Rancho and Taos also participated.

  • The Family YMCA is taking registration for its free Diabetes Education and Prevention program.
    Topics to be covered are: what Type 2 diabetes is; what having pre-diabetes means; the signs, symptoms and risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes; how to reduce your risk of getting type 2 diabetes; and how to make the necessary lifestyle changes to lower your risk.
     Marta Gentry-Munger, MPH, RD, will teach the class. Gentry-Munger is a registered dietitian with extensive experience in wellness, nutrition education and disease prevention.

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre will sponsor a free workshop to aspiring playwrights or anyone interested in learning about or improving their knowledge of the craft of writing plays.  
    Deborah Magid, an award-winning playwright from Cleveland (and formerly of Los Alamos), will present the workshop over three evenings, from 7-9 p.m. April 17and 24 and May 1 at the Little Theatre.
    The workshop will focus on writing the 10-minute play, an increasingly popular format with community theaters.
    Magid will use “A More Perfect Ten” by Gary Garrison as the text for the workshop. The workshop is free, but participants should plan on obtaining the text on their own.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Azur, 428 Agua Fria St.
    Date inspected: March 13
    Violations: Three high-risk violations for poor personal hygiene — hand sink in kitchen was used to store dirty dishes; there were no paper towels in the towel dispenser; and there was no soap available for this hand sink. All high-risk violations were corrected. Two low-risk violations, one for floors/walls/ceilings — the wall across from the undercounter freezer unit is cracked. Seal; some light bulbs in the exhaust hoods are burnt. Replace.

  • Like most books by Hunter S. Thompson, the “Rum Diary” is not for everyone.
    His gonzo style of journalism probably doesn’t interest the masses and neither do his books.
    In fact, those not interested in journalism and his wild tales probably won’t be interested in his writing.
    Thompson’s style is sometimes hard to follow. It doesn’t always flow the way one would expect. It’s choppy, sometimes convoluted and sometimes strange. But that’s what makes his style so unique.

  • Sometimes it’s ignored. Sometimes people afflicted with it are in denial. Other times, family members are helpless because they have no idea what to do about it, but mental illness isn’t something that will just go away.
    Those who are affected by it need to seek help and those that have family members suffering from it need seek help on their behalf.
    In an effort to spotlight on the subject, a group of people from Los Alamos and the surrounding areas will share their stories with Los Alamos residents at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Duane Smith Auditorium in a series of monologues titled, “Minds Interrupted: Stories of Lives Affected by Mental Illness.” Congressman Ben Ray Luján will introduce the stories.

  • Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series presents a talk on one of the most discussed issues in New Mexico and the Southwest: water and in particular, the Rio Grande. This study by three authors in different fields examines the history of the Rio Grande from many angles.
    G. Emlen Hall and Fred Phillips will present, “Authors of Reining in the Rio Grande: People, Land and Water,” at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
    The study examines human interactions with the Rio Grande from prehistoric time to the present day and explores what possibilities remain for the desert river.

  • Pregnant women get asked many questions as they await their babies: When are you due? Is it a boy or a girl? Have you picked out a name? Have you written a birth plan?
    Or even, sometimes: Who’s the father?
    In “The Snapper,” sort of a 1993 Irish precursor to the 2007 American mega hit “Knocked Up” — in that both comedies star a fetus that does not result from sacred marital love, but rather from booze — 20-year-old Sharon Curley (Tina Kellegher) does not want to answer that last question.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Reel Deal Theater will offer a special showing of “Jane’s Journey,” an award-winning film about Jane Goodall, at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    The film will be $10 for adults and $5 for children. 
     It would be hard to name anyone who has had more of an impact in the realm of animal research and wildlife conservation than Goodall.
    Her pioneering study of wild chimpanzee behavior in Africa continues today, more than 50 years later, under the auspices of her institute.

  • The White Rim and Island in the Sky sound like places from fantasy, but these places are real and Dennis Brandt has spent years exploring them.
    At 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge, Brandt will present highlights from mountain biking and hiking trips in Canyonlands National Park. Island in the Sky overlooks the confluence of the Green and Colorado rivers, near Moab, Utah. The White Rim is a layer of white sandstone boasting a 100-mile loop road enjoyed by mountain bikers, motorcyclists, four-wheel drive enthusiasts and hikers. The Rim trip bestows views of snow-capped mountains, sheer cliffs and the vast maze of canyon country. Nearby expanses of slick rock offer rock climbing, mountain biking, canyoneering and whitewater boating.