.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Helping Earth

    Earth Day in Los Alamos, organized for the 11th consecutive year by Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), was an outstanding success due to the efforts of a large number of volunteers and the support of many sponsors.

    This letter is to thank all of these volunteers and sponsors and those who attended one of our events this year.

  • Musician Tinsley Ellis is a quiet-spoken man. His low-key demeanor during an interview with Monitor seems highly contrasted to reviews of his performances.

    Relix described his music as “blistering, inspired roadhouse blues and passionate Southern rock … gritty, soulful vocals.”

    Billboard goes on to say, “Altlanta’s Tinsley Ellis sings like a man possessed and wields a ferocious lead guitar … one of today’s premier blues/rock players.”

  • Among the thousands of runners who will participate in this year’s Jemez Mountain Trail Runs, an utlrarunning legend will also hit the trail.

    Ultrarunning legend Micah True (aka Caballo Blanco) will not only participate in the trail runs but he will share his story about living and running with the Tarahumara Indians of Central Mexico.

  • Art is not limited to impressionism or baroque styles. There’s a whole other style of art that thrives in urban areas. It decorates city buildings, adorns people’s arms and ankles and pops up on TV. Perhaps street art is easy to dismiss because it strays from the mainstream but it does have real credibility. Just look at artist Jesse Hernandez’s work. According to Hernandez’s Web site, the artist is influenced by a combination of styles.  His work draws from traditional indigenous styles and themes with an urban sensibility.

  • Some stories are just plain better than others. Perhaps what gives certain tales the edge is a quality or characteristic that makes them different from the pack.

    These narratives have never been previously uttered; they do not feature some rehashed, recycled story format. So your attention sits up a little higher as the yarn unfolds.

    I heard such stories during the UNM-LA graduation Friday night.

  • It only takes one act for kindness to spread.

    Rachel Scott was the first student shot in April 1999 at Columbine High School.

    One month before she passed away, she had written for a class an essay titled, “My Ethics, My Code of Life.” It wasn’t just an assignment it was something she had practiced in her life for years.

  • Graduating from high school, college or any program is a major accomplishment but another challenge is just ahead. Graduates need to decide what to do with their newly acquired knowledge and what path to pursue from this point.

    With the caps tossed in the air and the diplomas distributed, the Leadership Los Alamos 2010 class is now facing this challenge.

    What they do as leaders in the community remains to be seen; however, through several LLA graduates’ comments, one thing is clear, they are working hard to prove that the 2010 class is the best LLA class yet.

  • An landmark event occurred 50 years ago – at least to dessert enthusiasts – Häagen Dazs ice cream was born.  

    When a brand of ice cream is created, it calls for a celebration. Therefore, Daniel’s Café is hosting its free scoop night in celebration of Häagen Dazs’ 50th anniversary from 4-8 p.m. Tuesday.

    This event is not just about the delicious taste found in an icy cold scoop of ice cream, it’s an opportunity to meet different community entities that serve Los Alamos.

  • During the 2010 National Elementary Chess Championship, which was held May 6-9 in Atlanta, Aspen Elementary School competed against more than 2,000 elementary students.

    The competition was fierce but the Los Alamos students proved to be some of the top competitors in the state.

    Aspen Elementary School competed in four of the six National Championship sections that were held at the tournament.

  • Kendra Smale was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for May.

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects a graduating senior from  Los Alamos High School to honor each month. Students are selected on the basis of academic success, extracurricular involvement and service to the community.  

    Along with her parents, Kevin and Rachel Smale, she chose Susan Baker-Dillingham, her dance teacher of eight years and founding director of New Mexico Dance Theater (NMDT), to join her in accepting this honor.

  • Many participants from Los Alamos and Española gathered to observe the 59th Annual National Day of Prayer May 6 at the First United Methodist Church of Los Alamos.  

    Locally sponsored by several churches, the purpose of this observance was to provide prayerful support to communities and the nation. The hour-long program featured specific prayers for family, church, education, business/economy, government, the military, youth and the media.

  • An upcoming concert features collaboration not only between two musical entities but also multiple generations.

    The Los Alamos Community Winds and the Los Alamos High School choirs are joining forces to perform Carol Orff’s “Carmina Burana” at 7 p.m. May 22 at Duane Smith Auditorium.

    Not only are high school students taking part in this community concert, three teenagers are stepping into the spotlight as solo singers.

  • J. Michael Orenduff, author of the popular “Pot Thief” mysteries, returns to Los Alamos from 4-6 p.m. May 21 to sign “The Pot Thief Who Studied Ptolemy” and partake in a Dutch-treat dinner at the Hill Diner afterwards.

  • Founders of the Pajarito Dance Project Melissa Balice, Alina Deshpande and Julia Fair are presenting a one-hour dance showcase, a mix of cultural styles and different techniques, “Every! Buddy! Dance!” at 7 p.m. May 20 at the Duane Smith Auditorium.

    Doors open at 6:30 p.m.  

    The $1 donation per person includes admission to the show and a raffle ticket for a chance to win items such as Fair’s original jewelry, a Spanish shawl similar to the ones used in the dance and Los Alamos Chamber Bucks.

  • This has been a Spark-tacular week for the Assets program.

    Even though the infamous “It’s May,” mantra has reared its ugly head, there’s a lot of work getting done.

    “It’s May,” is really the only descriptor needed amongst friends for that four-week period of craziness where you seem to be flying at mock speed, but aren’t really sure what you’re getting done.

    It is a time when on certain days of this month you wonder if anybody keeps house, who does the dishes or when that pile of filing will really get done.

  • There are tricks to every trade including art. Take, for instance, using a grid and carbon paper to create a work of art.

  • Looking back at your childhood, what memories come to mind? Having family picnics at the park? Running through an open field with your friends? Gazing at the sky making shapes out of the clouds? Were you young enough to have attended the Los Alamos Kite Festival?

  • In a show of appreciation to the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) volunteers, a hoe-down was held Friday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. First Photo: Members of the Los Alamos Mountain Mixers teach some of the RSVP members how to square dance. Second Photo: Square dance caller Mike Holly (left), cools his heels for a little bit along with Marlene Kelley, Tom Kelley, Cal Moss and Susan Krohn. Third Photo: RSVP volunteer Rose Butera enjoys the festivities at the event.

  • The story behind this particular band just does not seem to be the norm. There is something fantastical and out-of-this-world about Igor and the Red Elvises.

    The band made its start as a Russian group playing “Siberian Surf Rock,” according to the band’s Web site.

    The Web site reports that Igor Yuzov, the singer, songwriter and guitarist, grew up in the former Soviet Union, where folk music reigned and rock n’ roll was illegal. Yuzov defied convention and sought out forbidden records.

  • Los Alamos Little Theater made one smart choice with its musical production of “The Spitfire Grill.”  

    For any audience in any town, its message of hope and friendship is just what the doctor ordered. But sitting in the theater Saturday night, I felt the play was prescribed just for Los Alamos.

    Gilead, Wis., is a small town that once strutted strong but now limps along due to the quarry closing. Businesses were boarded up and people left town. In sum, Gilead is in a tight spot. Sound familiar?