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Features

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, June 17, 2011
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – LIVE!
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting (Replay 6-07-11)
    03:00 PM Start up Ceremony of the MW Turbine
        at the Abiquiu Hydroelctric Facility
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society-“World War II: One Soldier’s Story”
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Pure Mind
    09:00 PM UCTV

    Saturday, June 18, 2011
    5:00 UCTV

    Sunday, June 19, 2011
    06:00 AM UCTV

  • The Los Alamos Community Winds has joined a consortium of 15 community bands from across the country to commission a new wind ensemble piece, “Fantasia on Silent Night,” by award-winning composer James Syler.
    “I have wanted to do something like this for awhile — playing with the ‘Silent Night’ tune. I’ve already started to work on it,” Syler said. “It’s odd to work on a Christmas carol in the middle of summer.”
    The name of each commissioning ensemble and their directors will be printed on the score. The score and parts will be turned in on Oct. 1.

  • In July and August, global opera star Mark Steven Doss will once again portray Mephistopheles when he takes the stage for the Santa Fe Opera’s first-ever production of “Faust.”
    Reprising Charles
    Gounod’s demonic villain for his seventh production, which will bring his career performances to 40, it is a role that he continues to savor.
    “Mephistopheles is a physically demanding role, which requires me to be on stage throughout most of the production, and I enjoy it immensely,” said Doss, who is a Grammy Award winning bass-baritone and former Santa Fe Opera apprentice. “I continue to build on each of my previous performances to further reveal the power and pain of the fallen angel.”

  • ALBUQUERQUE — “The Case of the Indian Trader” (University of New Mexico Press) is the story of Billy Gene Malone and the end of an era.
    Malone lived almost his entire life on the Navajo Reservation working as an Indian trader; the last real Indian trader to operate historic Hubbell Trading Post.
    While Malone is at the center of this story, a more complex picture unfolds in federal agent Paul Berkowitz’s detailed account of how the National Park Service launched — and recklessly pursued — an investigation targeting Malone, falsely accusing him of a host of crimes. In 2005, Berkowitz was assigned to take over the year-and-a-half-old case.

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society is hosting a book signing and author talk with Robert J. Torrez and Robert Trapp, co-authors of Rio Arriba: A New Mexico County, on Tuesday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. The book signing is in conjunction with Homestead Day, part of the Summer Adventures in History and Science sponsored every Tuesday in June and July by the Los Alamos Historical Society and Bradbury Science Museum.
    Rio Arriba: A New Mexico County reviews the history of the area. The authors provide  an overview of its primordial beginnings, the Tewa peoples that established the county’s first permanent settlements, the role the Navajo, Ute, and Jicarilla Apache played in the region’s history.

  • Each year families anticipate The Santa Fe Opera’s popular Youth Nights at the Opera, a special program that allows them to attend final dress rehearsals at greatly reduced prices.  
    Since its inception in 1959, Youth Nights at the Opera have provided an opportunity for over 225,000 children and young adults to see professionally staged opera performances.  General Director Charles MacKay attributes his love of opera to his attendance at the very first Youth Night performance of “Die Fledermaus,” in 1959.

  • It’s a rare occasion when two theatres can come together to coordinate a show to bring to Los Alamos. It is even more rare when an actor from Albuquerque brings a show to Los Alamos,  which he plans to tour the country with, hoping to eventually end up on Broadway. Jim Cady of the Adobe Theater in Albuquerque has that goal for “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill.” Performances at the Los Alamos Little Theatre are a step toward helping him further realize that goal.
    “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill” just finished a run at Warehouse 21 in Santa Fe. There were two performances, both of which resulted in thunderous applause and standing ovations.

  •     Greg Abate, considered one of the top saxophonists in the world, will play bebop jazz at 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond as part of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.
    After graduating from the Berklee College of Music in the mid 70s, he started his own ensemble called “Channel One,” but soon quit to play lead alto sax for the Ray Charles Orchestra.
    He stayed on with the orchestra for a couple of years then went back to his own band and sound, and then joined the Artie Shaw Orchestra, where he played tenor sax.
    However, he ran into problems with both bands because he was unable to improvise. The bands were too structured and Abate considered himself a very cool jazz musician.

  • What is a turtle’s favorite food? Does a snake feel smooth or rough? What does a scorpion look like under ultraviolet light? Join animal care expert Jennifer Macke from 10-11 a.m. June 24 at Pajarito Environmental Education Center for an informative class about the live animals on exhibit. Macke will discuss what each animal eats and share some facts about each one. The program will answer many questions about local reptiles and amphibians.
    Kids of all ages will get to touch and feed some of the animals. They will dig worms from PEEC’s worm farm, to feed Elf the turtle. They will compare how an animal’s skin is different, depending on whether it lives in water or on land.

  • Key Club President William Sky Korber, was awarded a Kiwanis scholarship. He will attend the Univserity of California at Berkeley and study pre-med.  His parents are Bette Korber and James Theiler. Pictured from left to right, Kiwanis President Fran Berting, Key Club Mentor Don Casperson, Bette Korber, William Sky Korber, James Theiler and Key Club Mentor Morrie Pongratz.

  • Join PEEC and Dorothy Hoard on Saturday for a guided tour of Canyon de Valle in Los Alamos.
    This free hike will begin at 9 a.m. and will last for about five hours, though participants may hike only as far as they wish and return any time. 
    For four years, a dedicated team of dendrophiles (tree-lovers) has been scouring Los Alamos for the biggest tree of each species that appears in the county.
    Depending on their preferred habitat, the biggest trees range in elevation from a hackberry along the Rio Grande in White Rock Canyon, to an aspen near the ridgeline of the mountains above town.

  • Madison Ahlers, daughter of Joan and Gary Ahlers, was recently awarded a Kiwanis scholarship. She will attend the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and study government and biology. She would someday like to be a helicopter pilot. Pictured left to right, Kiwanis President Fran Berting, Madison Ahlers and Joan Ahlers.

     

  • Pictured from left to right, Don Casperson, Kiwanian and Key Club Mentor; dad Devon Engleman; Key Club MemberTaylor Engleman; Key Club Member Morgan Vaughn; Randy and Nancy Vaughn (Morgan’s parents), and Morrie Pongratz. Each student received a check from Kiwanis. Vaughn will attend Arizona State University and Engleman will attend The University of New Mexico.

     

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Cats
    Stripe  — The latest addition to the cat room.  Often seen sunning near the window.  She is a big, gentle girl –  15.4 lbs.  What a sweetie.
    Missy — Another model in our ‘Gray Tabby’ line, Missy is a 4-year-old spayed lady who is attentive and loving.  She would prefer a quieter home environment, and will make a great companion – especially if sitting on laps is involved!  Loves chasing toys.

  • The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation awarded seven scholarships to members of the Class of 2011.
    The winners included Shannon Blair, Eli Chertkov, Morgan Vaughn, Taylor Engleman, Meghan Montoya, Keanna Cohen and Ellen Rabin.
    Each of the winners was selected based on criteria such as  academic achievement and service to the community and to the public schools. Following their selection, winners are asked to select an Educator of Distinction.
    The Educators of Distinction are those who had a significant impact on the winner’s development during their years at LAPS.
    For her Educator of Distinction, Blair chose Advanced Placement American Literature teacher, Catherine Purananda.

  • Award-winning mystery writer J. Michael Orenduff returns to Los Alamos Tuesday to sign his new Pot Thief mystery, “The Pot Thief Who Studied Escoffier,” at Otowi Station Bookstore.
    “We’re delighted to offer two signing sessions on Tuesday,” said Peggy Durbin, co-owner of Otowi Station. “Los Alamos readers like Mike, and Mike likes Los Alamos readers.”
    Orenduff will sign his book between noon-2 p.m. and again from 6-7:30 p.m.

  • The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks will host a Flag Day ceremony Tuesday at its lodge, located at 1600 Trinity Drive.
    The ceremony is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. Hot dogs, chips, potato salad and pie will be served following the ceremony. The public is invited to attend the ceremony.
    Flag Day was signed into law by president Harry Truman in 1949. It commemorates the day the Continental Congress adopted the Stars and Stripes as the official flag of the United States of America in 1777.
    The BPOE provides services to local communities through programs that support veterans and youth.
    For more information on Tuesday’s event, visit the group’s website, www.elks.org.

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, June 10, 2011
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – LIVE!
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting (Replay 6-07-11)
    03:00 PM Start up Ceremony of the MW Turbine at the Abiquiu Hydroelctric Facility
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society -“World War II: One Soldier’s Story”
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Pure Mind
    09:00 PM UCTV

    Saturday, June 11, 2011
    5:00 UCTV

    Sunday, June 12, 2011
    06:00 AM UCTV

  • The Los Alamos Mountaineers will host a presentation by Jackie Little as she describes her 65-mile paddle along the Sea of Cortez.
    Little’s presentation, “Paddling the Baja Desert Coast with Dick Opsahl,” is scheduled for 8 p.m. June 15 at Fuller Lodge. The presentation is free and open to the public.
    The trip, which was organized by Opsahl, a former Los Alamos resident, covered the distance of the coast from Loreto to La Paz.
    Opsahl invited Little and 12 more of his friends on the trek. The seven days on the water were filled with pre-dawn fishing, six-to-eight hours per day of paddling, snorkeling, beachcombing, fine dining and more.

  • Water Canyon Trail is popular with many of the locals in Los Alamos.  
    It is a short, easy journey along an old wagon road through an aspen and pine forest.  Its scenic beauty is unsurpassed, boasting permanent streams, wildflowers and emerging butterflies.
    Paying closer attention, however, you may notice something more about this trail. There is definitely more than meets the eye.
    This is a trail that many have traveled hundreds of times. Bees collect pollen for their hives and evidence of deer and elk show the area’s popularity with the animal kingdom, as well.
    What might not be as well known, however, is that this trail has quite a bit of historical significance.