• Have you ever wondered what it takes to write a play, poem, story, or novel? Is it inspiration, hard work, or both? According to Thomas Alva Edison, it is mostly the latter: “Genius is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.”  Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series is offering the chance to find out from the experts.
    “Inspiration and Perspiration: A Conversation,” at 7 p.m. Sept. 22 in the upstairs rotunda, is a symposium featuring four authors of four different genres, moderated by Los Alamos County Library Manager Charlie Kalogeros Chattan, whose job it is to foster and provide access to the product of the authors’ efforts.

  • A book combining photography with one of the most interesting journeys in New Mexico’s history is the topic of a slideshow at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge. Greg Mac Gregor and Siegfried Halus, photographers and authors of “In Search of Dominguez & Escalante” will give a slideshow presentation about the book.

  • The Family YMCA is taking registration for its free Diabetes Education and Prevention program.  
    Topics to be covered are: what Type 2 diabetes is; what having pre-diabetes means; the signs, symptoms and risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes; how to reduce your risk of getting type 2 diabetes; and how to make the necessary lifestyle changes to lower your risk.

  • The 2011 Homecoming Parade will be Sept. 30. Staging begins at 1:30 p.m. on 4th Street, in the Canyon School parking lot.
    The parade will step off at the intersection of 4th Street and Central Avenue promptly at 2:30 p.m. Parade participants should arrive no later than 2 p.m.
    The parade will head down Central Avenue, past the judges’ stand at Starbucks, and down to Rose Street. This year’s homecoming parade theme is, “Short Circuit the Chargers,” pertaining to Albuquerque Academy.
    Entries for the parade are $10-$15. Checks should be made payable to LAHS and must be hand delivered to the LAHS bookkeeper at the high school.
    The bookkeeper is located off of Orange Street, behind Duane Smith Auditorium.

  • Wikipedia defines the phrase, “Death by a thousand cuts” as a torture originating in Imperial China. In modern usage, it has come to mean a major negative change that happens in small, unnoticed increments so it isn’t perceived as objectionable. In other words, creeping normalcy.
    Death by a thousand paper cuts might be a good phrase for what is happening to the public school systems. Strapped for money to purchase supplies, teachers and administrators are forced to make decisions about what not to buy.

  • The Los Alamos Concert Association begins its 65th anniversary season Sept. 25 with classical guitarist Eliot Fisk and the U.S. premier of Kurt Schwertsik’s “Ein Klienes Requiem.” The concert will be at 4 p.m. at Duane Smith Auditorium.
    Fisk has been described by the New York Times as “one of the most electrifying classical guitarists of his generation” and The New Yorker called him “the king of the American classical guitar.”

  • Santa Fe

    Allsup’s 252 Fina, 2007 Calle Lorca. Inspected on Sept. 9, 2011. Two high-risk violations: Hot holding chicken 108 degrees, burritos 107-120 degrees — corrected. Items destroyed; hand sink drains slowly, drain unplugged — corrected. One moderate-risk violation: Paint roller washed in wash sink. Two low-risk violations: Men’s restroom door not closing tightly; men’s restroom soap and towel dispenser not operating properly. Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up inspection required.

    Capshaw Junior High School, 361 E. Zia Road. Inspected on Sept. 12, 2011. One moderate-risk violation: Can opener was not cleaned and sanitized after use. Status of establishment: Approved.

  • On Oct. 8, The American Cancer Society will hold its annual “Making Strides Against Breast Cancer” five-mile walk and fundraiser. Volunteers are needed for registration, water stations and general clean up. People interested in volunteering should contact Gloria Martinez at 505-820-3538, or email gloria.martinez@cancer.og.
    The walk starts at Santa Fe at Villa Linda Park with registration and a welcome program at 8 a.m. Both teams and individual walkers are welcome. Participants will walk along the Arroyo de Los Chamisos Trail to celebrate survivorship, express hope and share the goal to end a disease that threatens the lives of so many people.

  • On Sept. 17 the Los Alamos Arts Council will host the second Sec Sandoval Chalk Walk, a festival and celebration of chalk drawing, the artistic process and all the local, creative, talented individuals who call Los Alamos home.  
    Join the Los Alamos Arts Council for a celebration of art and community Saturday, on the sidewalks behind Fuller Lodge, in collaboration with The Next Big Idea. Special prizes will be awarded to an entrant in each category selected by the judges. This is an event for all ages and aspiring chalk artists are encouraged to apply as individuals, a group or family.

  • Michael Mandrell, a contemporary American finger style guitarist whose orchestral compositions offer equal parts world and new age, an array of middle Eastern rhythms and scales, with tinges of folk and an infusion of Celtic overtones, will perform at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos.
     His latest recording, “Returning and Returned” is a collection of his solo guitar work that covers a wide range of styles.

  • Take a walk in the woods with Tim Althauser, as Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery presents his first solo exhibition. The opening reception will be from 5-7 p.m. Sept. 23 at Wray’s gallery, 2101 Trinity Dr., Suite B-2.
    Five new paintings will be on display for the first time. Althauser completed these paintings while ash from the Los Conchas fire rained down into his yard.
    The fire was a reminder of his love for the beauty of trees, especially Aspens.
    “Aspens are the rebirth trees. They make shade for the conifers and the pine to grow,” Althauser said. “Aspens are the forest renewal tree and the first tree to come in after a fire. To me it’s the birth of a forest when baby Aspens come up.”

  • For an amateur archaeologist and curious explorer,  there is nothing comparable to visiting the forgotten towns and villages of yesteryear. Handling the artifacts and witnessing the ruined walls first-hand can often yield important information not found in the pages of books or scholarly papers.    
    However, sifting through texts is sometimes necessary to glean important details and place artifacts in the context of time and space. In fact, I’ve realized that while physical artifacts are exciting, comparable knowledge can be found among the pages of a book.  

    The Quest for Knowledge

  • There is so much to do that this week, we’ll have to give you two assets, so we can squeeze them all in during the month. Our focus this week is asset 22, school engagement and asset 23, homework.
     Research indicates that there is a need for youth to be actively engaged in learning, and that a minimum of an hour of homework each night might be the key.
     This week, there are two opportunities to engage kids in learning, while you get to be involved, too.
     The first is Thursday  from 6-7:30 p.m. at Chamisa Elementary. The school science night provides some hands-on opportunities to learn, mixed with a little fun.

  • The summer rains were late, but they came. As always, they encouraged the annuals to pop up and the perennials to reach new heights.  
    Chick Keller will lead a free evening flower walk for Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 5:30 p.m. today. As curator of the Jemez Mountain Herbarium, Keller will provide a list of plants so that participants can keep track of what they see.  
    After meeting at PEEC, 3540 Orange Street, the group will caravan to the best site for September blooms. Asters, sunflowers, groundsels, skyrocket gilia, gayfeather — they’re all waiting to be admired

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.
    Signs of heat stroke in a pet are: rapid panting, wide eyes, lots of drooling, hot skin, twitching muscles, vomiting and a dazed look. Call your vet if you think your pet has heat stroke.

  • House of Hope and Shop
    on the Corner say thanks


  • Editor’s note: The Los Alamos Monitor will begin running restaurant inspection reports for Los Alamos, Española and Santa Fe in “Diversions” as they become available.

     Los Alamos

  • The Los Alamos Master Gardeners and the Los Alamos Photography Club feature, “Art, Gardening and Photography,” presented by Charles Mann, at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at Fuller Lodge.
    There are many who would  tell us how to photograph our gardens, but who can tell us why we want to photograph them? Mann, a professional garden photographer, has pondered the issues of art, beauty, nature and photography and has some insights, observations and conclusions to share, along with a panoply of photographs from across the gardening spectrum. Mann suggests that people learn to use their cameras as a tool to renew their enthusiasm for gardening as well as to  revive their appreciation for the hidden beauty all around them.

  • Those who have never experienced live theatre will have the opportunity to do so.
    Theatre is a unique experience, much different than a movie or sporting event — it is all about stories, emotion and local talent. Los Alamos Little Theatre presents the “8x103” one act play festival, opening Friday.
    The title, “8x103” represents eight 10-minute plays to make up a festival, and the three symbolizes LALT’s third such production, with others in 2006 and 2008. The included plays depict world views, relationships and  even a trip to France.

  • Nestled in the hills about 22 miles north of Española sits a village rich in history. It’s a “blink and you might miss it” kind of place, but the scenery surrounding the village is astounding, especially during autumn.
    With its red clay, stone formations  and stunning foliage along the Chama River, Abiquiú offers plenty of photo opportunities for visitors.
    These days, the area is known as Georgia O’Keeffe country because the New York artist made her home in Abiquiú, but it is steeped in history tied to the Abiquiú Genízaro Land Grant.