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Features

  • The United Church was filled with the sound of love on May 22. The Los Alamos Choral Society presented its audience with choral arrangements of love songs ranging from old folk songs spirituals, to the heartbeat of Broadway.
    Directed by Dr. Mary Badarak and accompanied by Cindy Little, the concert was a mix of literature sung with a rich tone quality and diction. There were several new, young faces in the choir and some of those young people were featured as soloists. The Choral Society is a non-auditioned choir that welcomes all who love to sing and thus includes singers of all ages and musical backgrounds.

  • At an event at the University of New Mexico recently, Technology Ventures Corporation honored TechSource for its outstanding service and growth in 2011.
    Each year, the Flying 40 Awards seeks to honor the 40 fastest-growing and highest revenue generating technology-based companies in New Mexico. TechSource, headquartered in Los Alamos, was recognized as a leading high-technology company in New Mexico.

  • Suzanne Lynne, left, and Ronda Harmon, right, won a grant last school year to provide the program, “Teach Like a Champion.” They are seen here facilitating a conversation about teaching techniques among many Los Alamos Public Schools teachers in the library at Mountain Elementary School.

  • Young people ages 8-17 will have a chance to take to the skies July 9 as the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 691 hosts a Young Eagles Flight Rally at Los Alamos County Airport.
    The rally is part of the EAA Young Eagles Program created to interest young people in aviation.
    Since the program was launched in 1992, volunteer EAA pilots have flown more than 1.4 million young people in more than 90 countries.
    “Free airplane rides are just part of the Flight Rally,” said James Shinas, spokesman for the event. “We hope to build relationships between pilots and young people, giving a new generation a chance to learn more about the possibilities that exist in the world of aviation.”

  • The best little town ever

    When sons and daughters are serving overseas in combat zones, the days can be difficult and time seems to go on forever, from one letter or phone call to the next. Folks often ask, “how do you get through it?” We get through it with the help of all the kind and wonderful people of Los Alamos.
    The outpouring of kind thoughts, caring words and the amazing generosity of all of you, with donations every week so that we can send packages to the troops at FOB Finley Shields in Afghanistan, has been overwhelmingly joyful.
    Here are a few replies from the troops serving there:

  • June 26-July 2 2011
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    9 a.m.    Toenail clipping
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Chicken and dumplings
    1:30 p.m.    Pilates
    7 p.m.    Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    10 a.m.    Low vision/hearing group

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    We get lots of roaming cats and dogs. Don’t assume your cat was a meal for a coyote or that your dog fell victim to something even scarier. This applies especially to animals missing in White Rock.

  • Soul-R&B master John Nemeth will entertain the crowd at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Pajarito Ski Hill, as part of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.  The show this week is “Pajarito Ski Hill and Los Alamos Monitor Night.”
    According to concert promoter Russ Gordon, folks used to call Nemeth a “rising blues star,” but he is now considered one of the top bluesmen in the world.
        Nemeth formed his first band at 17 in his hometown of Boise, Idaho. His friends had told him about Muddy Waters, Junior Wells and Sonny Boy Williamson and for Nemeth, it was heaven on first listen.

  • Born in a hotel and died in a hotel. That pretty much sums up the life of 20th century playwright Eugene O’Neill. The story of the playwright’s sometimes depressing, turbulent life was brought to the stage for its Los Alamos debut June 18.
    Los Alamos Little Theater and Champion Productions presented, “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill.” James Cady, who somewhat resembles O’Neill, wrote and performed the play as the Nobel Prize winner, who appears as a dead man and shares his life story with the audience. Riddled with obstacles and addiction, O’Neill was able to get past his tragedies long enough to produce his greatest works.

  • Those interested in conquering small kingdoms and showing off their word building skills somewhere other than in online games with friends might be interested in getting their geek on with the Los Alamos County Library system’s new series of programs geared toward 18-35 year olds.
    Participants interested in meeting new people, crushing their opponents in a game of “Settlers of Catan,” and those looking to show of their trivia skills will find like-minded people at the “Geekout” program.

  • One Los Alamos High School student earned his wings recently. Local Boy Scout Miguel Roman achieved the rank of Eagle in a special ceremony that took place last weekend.
    The Troop 122 Scout completed his Eagle Project earlier in the year and after many hours of work, he received the final reward.
    When the dog park in White Rock needed improvements and  general cleanup, Roman and his fellow scouts stepped in to assist.
    “We needed to dig up about a foot of dirt, pour in and spread out Santa Fe brown gravel in the dug up area,” said Roman. “Also, a small olive tree and bush, which are attaching to a fence, were to be dug up and we pulled weeds, as well.”

  • Assets In Action and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board teamed up with the Youth Activity Center recently for Minute to Win it. Assets In Action will host another Minute To Win It from 7-8 p.m. July 20 in the LAHS Auxiliary Gym. Admission is $2. All ages are invited and players will be selected from the crowd to compete for prizes. For more information or to sponsor a prize, call 661-4846.

     

  • Help with Cub Scout camp
    is appreciated

    I would like to extend my whole-hearted thanks to all who spend so much of their time helping the boys at our Day Camp.
    We moved the camp from our usual place at the Sportsmen’s Club to the Los Alamos Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints due to the extreme dryness in the canyon.
    I would also like to thank the church for allowing us to use their facilities on such short notice.
    Hopefully we will be back in Rendija Canyon next year.
    We had somewhere in the neighborhood of 150 total boys attend. And to do that, we needed at least 87 adults at one day each. The parents, friends and grandparents came through like the troopers they are.

  • Asset number 25 is “reading for pleasure,” and there’s no better time than the summer to make it happen.
    This asset would ideally have youth reading for three or more hours per week and sometimes summer time is the only time parents or caregivers can make that happen.
    Chamisa Librarian Lisa LaPrairie-Whitacre wanted students to retain their reading skills over the summer, so they come back to school ready to learn. To help out with that effort, she combined a variety of resources into a helpful little handout to assist parents and caregivers in accomplishing that goal.

  • Local Scouts gathered recently for their annual Day Camp. This year fire concerns moved the event from Rendija Canyon to the LDS Church in Los Alamos.

  • The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation announced the winners of its spring Great Ideas Grants.  There are two grant cycles for the Great Ideas Grants, one in spring and one in fall. The application is downloadable from the Foundation’s web site at www.lapsfoundation.com.
    Stacey Martens and Sheri Davis of Aspen Elementary were awarded $1,098 for a project called, “For the Love of Math I and II.” This project will allow 14 teachers to attend the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics regional conference in Albuquerque.  

  • Ever wondered what you would do if suddenly found yourself lost in the woods? Would you like to know that your kids would be okay if they strayed from you on the trail? From 10 a.m.-noon June 25, adults and kids ages eight and older can learn Lost Proofing at Pajarito Environmental Education Center, from 10 a.m. to noon. Led by Rob Dixon, the class will teach skills one will need to know if they are ever lost in the woods.
    The class will discuss what to do if you realize you are lost. It will also give tips and advice about how not to get lost in the first place and it will help answer questions such as, “how would you spend the night in woods with no tent?”
    Dixon has led classes, workshops and demonstrations for many schools and groups.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    All of our fully reconditioned adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are microchipped — a bargain in anyone’s book, all at one low price.
    We get lots of roaming cats and dogs. Don’t assume your cat was a meal for a coyote or that your dog fell victim to something even scarier. This applies especially to animals missing in White Rock. Check with the shelter and see if your best friend is bunking with us. And remember, when you come to claim your friend, you must have proof of rabies vaccination.
    Cats

  • Are you curious about the medicinal and herbal plants that grow wild on the Pajarito Plateau? Kristi Beguin will lead a walk around several sites in Los Alamos to find wild edible and medicinal herbs at 9:30 a.m. June 26. Participants will learn to recognize the herbs and how to use them. The class will last until 1:30 p.m. and will cost $30 or $24 for Pajarito Environmental Education Center members.  

  • The next meeting of the Los Alamos Geological Society will be 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Christian Church, 92 East Road.
    Dan Aiken, retired from Freeport-McMoran Copper and Gold, Inc., will present a talk entitled, “The Way to Antarctica: Land and Sea.”
    It is not easy getting to Antarctica. It takes luck, commitment, timing, money, seasick medication and some good garments, plus an exceptional guidebook to remote places.
    Equipped with all of the above, plus a healthy fear of Drake’s Passage and the experience of being left behind on pack ice, Aiken  journeyed south from Brazil, where he was living. This talk is about that journey and how the geology of Antarctica relates to the breakup of Gondwana.