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Features

  • When local French horn player, John Hargreaves, was asked if his instrument is the hardest instrument to learn to play well, he just smiled, didn’t give a direct answer but said, “French horn players are always asked that question!”
    Hargreaves will solo with the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra April 27 at the Crossroads Bible Church. As he described his journey to becoming an accomplished horn player, the answer to that question points to an obvious “yes.”

  • K-Kids, a Kiwanis-sponsored club at Barranca, shows their seedlings for the Los Alamos Youth Food Project. These seedlings will be planted at the LAMS garden site in May during the LAYFP Planting Festival.

  • On April 28, the Los Alamos Youth Leadership program will put their skills to the test with the annual LAYL Wild Day.
    The funfest, which is limited to the first 100 participants, will be from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Los Alamos High School’s Griffith Gym.
    “Janali Gustafson and Haley Bridgewater have taken the leadership role in organizing WILD Day,” said LAYL Coordinator Susan Odegard-Fellows.” They both are dedicated to LAYL and making WILD Day a success.”
    Odegard-Fellows is in her second year with the LAYL crew and is enjoying it every step of the way. “Working with the LAYL students gives one hope for the future leaders of tomorrow,” she said.

  • Great Conversations is an afternoon of appetizers and desserts and an in-depth conversation with a subject-area expert.
    Los Alamos Public Schools will host the Third Annual Great Conversations from 2-4:30 p.m. Sunday in the new building at Los Alamos High School.
    Tickets are $50 per person and can be obtained by filling out a registration form at lapsfoundation.com/greatconversations.shtml. Three of the 14 tables are featured here.  
    Steve and Tiffany Anton will host, “FIRST Things First: What is FIRST Robotics?” The ultimate multi-disciplinary engineering topic: robotics. The Antons will share their passion for First Robotics, which was the brainchild of the inventor of the Segway.

  • “A serious, thought-provoking work of substance, quality and class … ‘Shadowlands’ speaks of this world as being a prelude for what will follow and how pain is the inverse of joy …” said Jeff Lyons of CBS Radio, describing the British play written by William Nicholson.
    Nicholson, a former BBC documentary film producer, has written several award-winning screenplays.
    His first work for the stage, “Shadowlands,” won the 1990 London Evening Standard Best Play Award. This script is the basis for the 1993 movie featuring Anthony Hopkins and Deborah Winger.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Capital High School, 4851 Paseo del Sol
    Date inspected: April 12
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — food stored below unshielded cooler condenser drain line. Two low-risk violations for ventilation/lighting — three lights not operable in prep area. Inadequate lighting; inadequate light in freezer.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Capital High Athletics, 4851 Paseo del Sol
    Date inspected: April 12
    Violations: One low-risk violation for administration: permit not posted, permit required.

  • “Russian music always touches my soul” and “I really like this symphony,” are comments made by two violinists in the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra, in reference to the rarely played symphony the group will perform as part of the Spring Concert on April 27.
    The work is not by one of the giants of Russian composers — Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovich or Borodin, to name a few — but by a relatively unknown composer, Vasily Kalinnikov (1866-1901).

  • Family Strengths Network would like to extend our heartfelt gratitude to all those who participated in Family Festival.
    About 500 people attended Family Festival this year; its success is dependent on the volunteers and organizations that participate.
    We could not run this event without the help of our event coordinator, Karen Greenfield, the many volunteers from Key Club, Natural Helpers, RSVP, Beta Sigma Phi, LANB, Los Alamos Middle School, the FSN Board and many other individuals.
    We are also grateful to all the businesses and organizations that came to share the great activities that Los Alamos has to offer to families.

  • Los Alamos Police Department in collaboration with a variety of agencies will present “Every 15 Minutes,” at Los Alamos High School today.
    The event is an opportunity to educate students about the gravity of topics like drinking and driving, prior to large-scale events like the prom.

  • This week, we look at youth programs in our community, as we pull together to be one of the 100 Best Communities for Young People.
    The Search Institute looks at youth programs when a young person spends three or more hours per week in sports, clubs or organizations at school and/or in community organizations.
    The Search Institute is one of the partner organizations joining with America’s Promise to recognize 100 communities across the nation as being great places for young people to live.
    As a volunteer, I have been asked by Los Alamos Public Schools to champion this effort to have our community receive this recognition.

  • It is occasionally said that the atmosphere at Chamisa Elementary is like a carnival. That statement will become a reality on April 21.
    The Cheetahs will welcome the public during their annual fundraiser this weekend. Some of the offerings include sno-cones, cotton candy and games.
    The kid-friendly climate will benefit teachers, students, programs and projects to help youth, “put their best foot forward in scholarship, character and life.”
    “The carnival is open to everyone,” Tana Beverwyk-Abouda said. “Everyone, that is, who wants to have a great time for all ages, support their local school and celebrate the spring weather by being outside.”

  • Imaging standing on ice, with a view as far as you can see. Matt Heavner will describe seven years of research on the Juneau Ice field in Southeast Alaska at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, as part of the Los Alamos Mountaineers’ monthly meeting.
    Anyone who has visited the city of Juneau has very likely visited the Mendenhall Glacier, which is just the tip of the ice field. The Juneau Ice field is the fifth-largest ice field in the western hemisphere, extending through an area of 3,900 square kilometers.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Others are currently off-site in foster homes. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    Save the date. At 9 a.m. April 28 the Dog Jog to benefit Friends of the Shelter will kick off. For more information or an entry form, visit lafos.org/dogjog.

    DOGS
    Rocky — Three-year-old neutered Pug/Boston Terrier-mix. Brindle color and crate-trained.
    Shadow — This energetic, young, spayed female Pit-cross has responded remarkably well to training. Call 505-433-8617 for more information.

  • Dr. Eric Bernstein of New Mexico Cancer Care, at Los Alamos Medical Center, will offer a free presentation on the topic of lymphoma April 19.
    Los Alamos Home Economist, Paula Roybal Sanchez, of Los Alamos Cooperative Extension joined the Council on Cancer in March of 2009 and currently chairs the council.
    “I’m always looking at ways to network and expand education efforts to more members of our community, thus improving the quality of life of our residents,” Roybal Sanchez said.
    “Both the LACC and the Los Alamos Cooperative Extension Service have a common goal of providing awareness and preventive education on health issues facing our community.”

  • Habitat for Humanity’s Building Kindness program is not currently accepting applications.
    Upon completion of the current home repair projects, applications will again be open.
    Consider volunteering to complete the many home repairs they have lined up.
    Contact the Building Kindness Administrator for more information at 505-901-7689.

  • The Los Alamos Branch of the American Association of University Women will meet to hear about Los Alamos Public Schools policy and curriculum concerning harassment in schools at 7:30 p.m. April 17 at First United Methodist Church, 715 Diamond Dr.
    This topic seems timely with all of the publicity being given to bullying.  LAPS Superintendent Gene Schmidt will speak about the current school district policy on bullying and sexual harassment.
    Schmidt has a doctorate in educational administration from Washington State University and more than 30 years experience in the field of education, including 12 years in the classroom.  

  • The Comcast Foundation announced the 2012 recipients of its annual Leaders and Achievers Scholarship Program awards, including Los Alamos High School student Benjamin Schilling.
    “Each year, we are excited to provide scholarships for these talented students,” said Charisse R. Lillie, president of the Comcast Foundation and vice president, Community Investment of Comcast Corporation.
    “Comcast seeks students who demonstrate leadership abilities in school activities and who reflect a strong commitment to community service.  These students are our future leaders and we hope these scholarships will help to power their dreams for success.”

  • Rachel Carson will make a visit to Los Alamos at 7 p.m. April 18 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.
    This appearance will actually be by Ann Beyke, who will take on Carson’s persona in a performance known as a Chautauqua.
    Imagine spring without singing birds. Carson’s cautionary tale, “Silent Spring,” warned of the effects of unchecked and unchallenged use of pesticides. Published in 1962, her book was applauded by some and considered pseudoscience by others.  But regardless of what anyone thinks about the merits of her book, it awakened the American public to problems of the overuse of pesticides and other pollutants.  

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Aldana’s Restaurant, 3875 Cerrillos Road, Space 12
    Date inspected: April 3
    Violations: One high-risk violation for poor personal hygiene — no waste receptacles availble at hand sink. Corrected. One moderate-risk violation for contaminated equipment — onion cutter was not properly cleaned and sanitized after use. One low-risk violation for ventilation/lighting — light out of order on vent hood.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Baskin Robbins, 4056 Cerrillos Road
    Date inspected: April 3

  • The annual benefit party for the Pajarito Environmental Educational Center, will be from 5-8 p.m. April 22 at the Hilltop House. This is the 13th year for PEEC’s involvement in the community-wide Earth Day Festival with its fundraising effort.
    For the past three years, Felicia Orth has been the chef at the Party for PEEC.  In 2010, she prepared food of the Native American period of history. Last year she gave attendees a taste of Spanish food related to the Spanish colonial period.
    This year, in commemoration of New Mexico’s Centennial, her menu will be related to the period of settlement of this continent,  celebrating 100 years of  New Mexico history and statehood.