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Features

  • First poetry slam in Jemez Springs

    Jemez Springs will host a poetry slam at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Presbyterian Church on Hwy. 4. The Friends of the Jemez Springs Library is sponsoring the event. This is a first for the village. Cleveland High School teacher Katrina Guariscio will kick off the evening. Admission is free.

  • Kiwanis, a global volunteer organization — and Key Cub International, its younger counterpart — have joined forces with UNICEF to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus.
    In an effort to help spread awareness and raise money for the vaccines, syringes, safe storage, transportation and time of skilled staff members, Los Alamos High School Key Club Secretary, Katelyn Littleton, has dedicated much of her senior year to this cause called, “Project Eliminate.”
    The elimination of maternal and neonatal tetanus is being done through the administration of a vaccine that protects a mother and all her children from the deadly disease, which affects roughly 60,000 babies every year, due to unsanitary birthing practices.

  • The years between 1905 and 1917 were difficult for Jews in Russia. The pre-revolutionary years witnessed a persecution of the Chosen People not known to Europe since the Spanish Inquisition.
    Jews were blamed for the assassination of Czar Alexander II in 1881 and became scapegoats for the growing revolutionary sentiment in Russia. They were subjected to humiliating taxes, anti-Semitic laws and state-sponsored terror.
    In the 40 years leading up to the 1917 Bolshevik revolution, nearly three million Jews were forced out of their homes to leave Russia.

  • April is a special month in the literary and library worlds, honoring both poetry (National Poetry Month)  and libraries (National Library Week was April 8-14). In recognition of the role libraries play in providing free and open access to information, the Mesa Public Library Authors Speak Series presents a book on challenges to what is included in library collections at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda.
    “True Stories of Censorship Battles in America’s Libraries” is a compilation of essays edited by librarians Valerie Nye and Kathy Barco, who have experienced challenges to remove material held in their own libraries’collections.

  • At 7 p.m. May 2 PEEC will present a talk on birds of Australia. Marion and Ramie Stelts will show their photographs and discuss these diverse and exotic birds.  The talk is free and open to the public. The Steltses have made six trips to Australia in the last 10 years and have fallen in love with Australian birds. This illustrated talk will discuss birds they have encountered in their travels, including many parrots, raptors, honeyeaters, flycatchers, bowerbirds and others.   For more information, PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • Suzanne Vilmain has devoted much of her life to words, first as an English teacher and always as an artist who uses words and text both as the symbols they are and as design elements. She brings some of her work to Mesa Public Library in “Bound Under the Influence: Book Arts by Suzanne Vilmain.”
    In Vilmain’s words,

  • The Asset category of focus this week is number 19, religious community.
    This is when a young person spends one hour or more per week in activities in a religious institution.
    Just in case the word religion turns you off, hold on a minute.
    The beauty is the folks at the Search Institute also look at religion defined as being spiritual.
    If the topic interests you, you can visit Search–Institute.org and type “spirituality” in the search box.
    The link will provide opportunities to look at the current generation vs. baby boomers and view information on everything from spirituality measures to psychological personality measures.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Others are currently off-site in foster homes. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    Save the date. At 9 a.m. April 28 the Dog Jog to benefit Friends of the Shelter will kick off. For more information or an entry form, visit lafos.org/dogjog.

    DOGS
    Rocky — Three-year-old neutered Pug/Boston Terrier-mix. Brindle color and crate-trained.

  • On behalf of the Los Alamos Friends of the Shelter, I would like to thank the Posse Shack for allowing us to fundraise at their April’s first Sunday of the month pancake breakfast.
    It was a tremendously successful event where we raised more than $3,000 for the animals of Northern New Mexico.
    I would like to extend special gratitude to Bob and Steve, who flipped hundreds of pancakes that morning.
    Sandy, who labored in front of a hot griddle, turning out bacon and sausages endlessly and Mark, who cooked eggs with skilled finesse.
    And last but not least, a big shout-out of thanks to Randy, who masterfully juggled overseeing the entire operation and directing the volunteers to chores that needed attending to.

  • On April 29 the Los Alamos Phi Beta Kappa Association will hold its 56th annual banquet to honor the top graduates of Los Alamos High School at 5:30 p.m. April 29.
    Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest undergraduate honors society in the United States and has about 275 members in Los Alamos County (1.5 percent of the county’s population).
    The banquet for the honor graduates, Phi Beta Kappa members and their guests, will be at Fuller Lodge and will be catered by Decadent Table.

  • When local French horn player, John Hargreaves, was asked if his instrument is the hardest instrument to learn to play well, he just smiled, didn’t give a direct answer but said, “French horn players are always asked that question!”
    Hargreaves will solo with the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra April 27 at the Crossroads Bible Church. As he described his journey to becoming an accomplished horn player, the answer to that question points to an obvious “yes.”

  • K-Kids, a Kiwanis-sponsored club at Barranca, shows their seedlings for the Los Alamos Youth Food Project. These seedlings will be planted at the LAMS garden site in May during the LAYFP Planting Festival.

  • On April 28, the Los Alamos Youth Leadership program will put their skills to the test with the annual LAYL Wild Day.
    The funfest, which is limited to the first 100 participants, will be from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Los Alamos High School’s Griffith Gym.
    “Janali Gustafson and Haley Bridgewater have taken the leadership role in organizing WILD Day,” said LAYL Coordinator Susan Odegard-Fellows.” They both are dedicated to LAYL and making WILD Day a success.”
    Odegard-Fellows is in her second year with the LAYL crew and is enjoying it every step of the way. “Working with the LAYL students gives one hope for the future leaders of tomorrow,” she said.

  • Great Conversations is an afternoon of appetizers and desserts and an in-depth conversation with a subject-area expert.
    Los Alamos Public Schools will host the Third Annual Great Conversations from 2-4:30 p.m. Sunday in the new building at Los Alamos High School.
    Tickets are $50 per person and can be obtained by filling out a registration form at lapsfoundation.com/greatconversations.shtml. Three of the 14 tables are featured here.  
    Steve and Tiffany Anton will host, “FIRST Things First: What is FIRST Robotics?” The ultimate multi-disciplinary engineering topic: robotics. The Antons will share their passion for First Robotics, which was the brainchild of the inventor of the Segway.

  • “A serious, thought-provoking work of substance, quality and class … ‘Shadowlands’ speaks of this world as being a prelude for what will follow and how pain is the inverse of joy …” said Jeff Lyons of CBS Radio, describing the British play written by William Nicholson.
    Nicholson, a former BBC documentary film producer, has written several award-winning screenplays.
    His first work for the stage, “Shadowlands,” won the 1990 London Evening Standard Best Play Award. This script is the basis for the 1993 movie featuring Anthony Hopkins and Deborah Winger.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Capital High School, 4851 Paseo del Sol
    Date inspected: April 12
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — food stored below unshielded cooler condenser drain line. Two low-risk violations for ventilation/lighting — three lights not operable in prep area. Inadequate lighting; inadequate light in freezer.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Capital High Athletics, 4851 Paseo del Sol
    Date inspected: April 12
    Violations: One low-risk violation for administration: permit not posted, permit required.

  • “Russian music always touches my soul” and “I really like this symphony,” are comments made by two violinists in the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra, in reference to the rarely played symphony the group will perform as part of the Spring Concert on April 27.
    The work is not by one of the giants of Russian composers — Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovich or Borodin, to name a few — but by a relatively unknown composer, Vasily Kalinnikov (1866-1901).

  • Family Strengths Network would like to extend our heartfelt gratitude to all those who participated in Family Festival.
    About 500 people attended Family Festival this year; its success is dependent on the volunteers and organizations that participate.
    We could not run this event without the help of our event coordinator, Karen Greenfield, the many volunteers from Key Club, Natural Helpers, RSVP, Beta Sigma Phi, LANB, Los Alamos Middle School, the FSN Board and many other individuals.
    We are also grateful to all the businesses and organizations that came to share the great activities that Los Alamos has to offer to families.

  • Los Alamos Police Department in collaboration with a variety of agencies will present “Every 15 Minutes,” at Los Alamos High School today.
    The event is an opportunity to educate students about the gravity of topics like drinking and driving, prior to large-scale events like the prom.

  • This week, we look at youth programs in our community, as we pull together to be one of the 100 Best Communities for Young People.
    The Search Institute looks at youth programs when a young person spends three or more hours per week in sports, clubs or organizations at school and/or in community organizations.
    The Search Institute is one of the partner organizations joining with America’s Promise to recognize 100 communities across the nation as being great places for young people to live.
    As a volunteer, I have been asked by Los Alamos Public Schools to champion this effort to have our community receive this recognition.