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Features

  • After our asset interlude into adult skill building, we’re back and focusing on positive values.
    This asset category looks at asset numbers 26-31, and begins with caring. The focus is young people placing high value on helping others. This is an easy one, and we see many ways for it to happen.
    This month, several locations will assist with the annual Assets In Action, March on Hunger.
    The program collects non-perishable food, with a preference for individually wrapped items that are easy to consume for lunch.
    A large number of students regularly don’t have lunch and Assets hopes to assist with having things for staff members to offer during such a time.

  • Michael G. Smith is a very-early retired Los Alamos National Laboratory chemist and former adjunct mathematics faculty at Santa Fe Community College.
    He will be the special guest speaker at a Poetry Gatherings special event titled, “Confluence: Patterns and Symmetry in Poetry and Mathematics,” at 6:30 p.m. March 8 in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.

  • Recognizing that the need for donations is greater than ever at local food banks across the nation, Curves International kicked off the 2012 Curves Food Drive March 1 with a challenge to all Curves Clubs to meet or exceed last year’s donations.
    Each club, including Curves of Los Alamos, is asking its members to donate bags of non-perishable food or cash throughout the month of March to support their local community food bank.
    In addition, Curves of Los Alamos will waive the membership fee for new members who bring in a bag of non-perishable food or donate $30 to their local food bank from March 12—25.

  • During a lecture sponsored by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center Wednesday evening, author and museum curator Katherine Ware offered alternative perspectives of environmental issues, seen through the eyes of contemporary landscape photographers.
    Ware shared photos excerpts from her book “Earth Now: American Photographers and the Environment,” a collection of photos from the recent museum exhibit at the New Mexico Museum of Art bearing the same name.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Be sure to click on the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org. You can volunteer and/or donate, as well as check out links to all our adoptable pals.
    Thank you to the community of Los Alamos and the Los Alamos Monitor staff for the outstanding support you give to the animals lovingly cared for in the shelter.

    DOGS
    Dorothy — Yellow Lab-mix. Spayed female, just surrendered. No children, please. Social skills need some work. She is still scared and defensive. Senior volunteers will work with her to evaluate her potential.

  • Los Alamos Next Big Idea Festival attracted the attention of James Karhu, casting producer with the new Discovery Channel competition show, “Top Engineer.”  
    Karhu contacted Suzette Fox at Los Alamos MainStreet, organizer of Next Big Idea, to get help identifying interested inventors, machinists and engineers to appear on the show.  

  •  The League of Women Voters study of the Public Regulation Commission will be discussed at the March 8 Lunch with a Leader. The event will be at 11:45 a.m. at Central Avenue Grill.
    Members of the study team will describe what they have discovered in the months they spent attending the PRC’s open meetings and hearings, and talking to PRC commissioners, staff and people who have had dealings with the PRC.
    They will also discuss the PRC reform legislation introduced in the 2012 legislative session, as well the resulting constitutional amendments that will be voted on this November.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Bandelier Grill, 11 Sherwood Blvd.
    Date inspected: Feb. 14
    Violations: One high-risk violation for storage — they had some oven cleaner cans near grill, which they removed. OK now. They had a grease fire earlier. Fire marshal called, concerned of sanitization of grill. The grill appears to be clean. One low-risk violation for floors/walls/ceilings — food item on floor behind the grill and stove needs to be cleaned.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Los Alamos Co-op Market, 95 Entrada Dr.
    Date inspected: Feb. 23

  • Join gardening instructor Martha Davis for a class on Small and Unusual Fruits for Los Alamos.The class will be from 7-9 p.m. March 6 held at Pajarito Environmental Education Center, 3540 Orange St.
    The class is $20 or $18 for PEEC members and advance registration is requested.
     Participants in the class will discover small and unusual fruits such as gooseberries, currants, Cornelian cherries and quinces.
    Learn how to grow these and what to do with them once they’ve grown. Davis will share strategies to deal with an unfamiliar fruit, how to cook with one and will provide recipes to class participants.

  • What started out as a joke on Leap Year four years ago, is becoming a reality for a group of Northern New Mexican artists.  
    In 2008, Española artist Nikki Bustos did a show at the Bond House Museum in Española. At that time, she made a deal with the person who used to run the museum. She jokingly agreed to do another show on the next Leap Year, not really expecting it to happen. As luck would have it, she was placed on the calendar. She had forgotten about it until she got a reminder about her March 2012 show.

  • One local resident is MADD and she’d like the community to help with her problem.
    White Rock resident Deb Minyard teaches at Pojoaque Valley High School and now she has to “Walk to Line.” Minyard is hoping local friends and neighbors will help her raise funds to support their senior appreciation night with a 3K and 5K walk on Saturday.
    “As a teacher, I am trying to raise awareness about the Walk Like MADD event and I am encouraging students in all of my classes to participate,” she said.
    Minyard is currently the band director and oversees freshman and juniors as an AVID teacher.

  • Those who have never been to a dinner theatre will get the chance from 5-8 p.m. Saturday at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.
    The dinner will be buffet-style, complete with wine and dessert, and will form an integral part with the play. Silent and live auctions will also be offered.
    According to the play’s authors, Jeff and Kandice Favorite, “The script is a parody of “The Love Boat.”  We started with a few lines that we found online and we greatly expanded it and made it local and personal.  It has been great fun to write and rehearse.  People are so funny.  We can’t wait to perform this for real.”

  •  Losing your husband and becoming a widow at an early age is a tragedy no one wants to consider.
    Imagine, however, that you are an eight-year-old in India and that you are widowed, without even remembering that you were married.
    In the Hindu faith, a wife is half her husband and when he dies, she is half a corpse, therefore she lives as though half-dead.  
    “Water” has the motive to open your eyes to the injustice these women suffer and it pulls you in through its rich character development.
    This remarkable film will carry you out of your comforts and into the home of these widows and the ashram they jointly inhabit from youth into old age.  

  • Are you an adult with an on-going health condition? The Family YMCA is offering a FREE MyCD (Manage Your Chronic Disease) Workshop. People with diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain, anxiety, depression, or other chronic health condition can learn how a MyCD Workshop can help take charge of their lives.
    Attendees will get the support they need, find practical ways to deal with pain and fatigue, discover better nutrition and exercise choices, understand new treatment choices, learn better ways to talk with their doctors and family about their health, set their own goals and make a step-by-step plan to improve their health — and lives.

  • This week we take a break from our regular asset-building moment to talk about asset building in adults.
    That’s right, you can build assets at any age.
    One of the reasons I wanted the assets work to fall under the Chamber of Commerce, was to have the ability to work with businesses.
    Businesses can build relationships with their customers and clients, resulting in lifelong bonds.
    Last week, two businesses soared into the asset-building realm by offering their hospitality under odd circumstances, while maintaining confidentiality.
    Illinois resident, Timothy Harris, conspired with local do-gooder, Deb Snow to pull off a surprise proposal to his girlfriend, Chamisa fifth grade teacher, Valerie Adams.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Be sure to click on the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org. You can volunteer and/or donate, as well as check out links to all our adoptable pals.
    Thank you to the community of Los Alamos and the Los Alamos Monitor staff for the outstanding support you give to the animals lovingly cared for in the shelter.

    DOGS
    Harry —Four-year-old neutered white Poodle/Wheaton Terrier-mix. Good with children and other animals. Housebroken. Courtesy grooming last week. Come see how cute he is.

  • A mom may call and say,  “I don’t think my baby is nursing quite right. Can you help me figure out what’s going on?” or “My health care provider said to contact you.”  
    Sometimes a dad will call and say, “My wife is having difficulties breastfeeding and would like to speak with you.”  
    It can be challenging at times to find lactation help.  La Leche League, a local non-profit, is one available resource and Pajarito Lactation, a recently formed for-profit service, is now another.  
    “Pajarito Lactation was born out of a need for additional lactation support in the Los Alamos area,” said owner Kelley Baer.

  • Imagine a Ute man and his ladylove in a world of mystery, murder and lawlessness. Place the leading man in Spanish Colonial Santa Fe and you’ve stepped into the world of Pamela Christie, author of “The King’s Lizard” and “The Dead Lizard’s Dance.”

    Christie spoke Thursday night before a crowd at the Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak series. Those who attended, received a treat, as Christie shared several excerpts from her books, along with unique insight on creating a fictional story in an historical context.

  • Community members gathered at the Fuller Lodge Art Center Friday evening for the opening of “Beauty in the Best.” Residents got a chance to talk to the artists and view their work. The exhibit will be on display through March 31.

  • Support has poured in for a youth project benefiting a Los Alamos Middle School student and there’s one week left for community members to take part.
    The LAMS Passion project was launched to help gather food, toys and other pet supplies for animals in need.
    The first-year project attempted to fill a gap for the animal shelter by collecting collars and leashes provided to pets on their way to their new homes and help with getting the word out about shelter calendars.
    The project for the 2011-2012 school year has taken a new turn, beginning with a pet food drive at the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce.