• During the two years (2006-2008) that the exhibit, “Spider Woman’s (Na ashje’ii ‘Asdzáá) Gift: Navajo Weaving Traditions” was at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, there were numerous requests for a catalogue.
    “Spider Woman’s Gift: Nineteenth Century Diné Textiles” is a response to that interest. Images from the exhibit’s classical Navajo (Diné) weavings illustrate illuminating essays by Joyce Begay-Foss and Marian E. Rodee.

  • A free family fishing clinic at Fenton Lake is being offered by Pajarito Environmental Education Center,  from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday.  
    The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish fishing skills instructor Ti Piper will teach the clinic. Fishing gear will be provided for those who have never fished or want to try a new type of fishing.
    Participants 12 and older will need to have a fishing license, and the vehicle entry fee to Fenton Lake is $5.
    The fishing clinic is geared toward all skill levels — from beginner to experienced — and will teach different kinds of fishing — bait, lure and fly. At noon there will be special fly-casting lessons.

  • As a celebration of creativity that crosses boundaries, and in conjunction with the Next Big Idea festival, Mesa Public Library will show Jack Ox’s intermedia painting in the Upstairs Art Gallery. A public reception will be from 4-5:45 p.m. Sept. 17.
    In today’s fluid world, definitions, perceptions and forms of expression are blurring: what is art, what is science, what is music? Or, can they intermingle, creating new forms? Ox has done just that with her vast, segmented painting, a visualization of a musical work by Kurt Schwitters, a groundbreaking artist who worked in multimedia in the 1930s. He is generally acknowledged as the 20th century’s greatest master of collage and installation art.

  • Casual observers and avid bird watchers might find Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Birdscape Tour interesting. The event will be from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 10
    The tour will give bird enthusiasts an opportunity to see how four Los Alamos residents design their yards to attract wild birds and learn their secrets, which is sure to give them take home ideas for attracting birds to their yards.
    Beside the simple enjoyment that watching birds provides, attracting avian friends has other benefits.  Many birds eat a variety of insects that are considered pests, including mosquitoes, aphids and bark beetles. Hummingbirds and other species are important pollinators as they go from flower to flower, sipping nectar.

  • Los Alamos High School football players attended the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series last week, during which they were introduced to the community by their coach Garett Williams.

  • Virginia Scharff will sign her history, “The Women Jefferson Loved,” from noon-2 p.m. Thursday at Otowi Station Bookstore.
    In the tradition of Annette Gordon-Reed’s “The Hemingses of Monticello” and David McCullough’s “John Adams,” Scharff offers a multi-generational biography revealing how the women Thomas Jefferson loved shaped the third president’s ideas and his vision for the nation.
    Throughout his life, Jefferson constructed a seemingly impenetrable wall between his public legacy and his private life, a tradition upheld by his family and his white male biographers.

  • Following the sell-out success of the first annual High Tea and Fashion Show last year, the House of Hope ladies’ mission team invites the community to join them again this year for a tea, followed by a fashion show.
    The afternoon’s activities are intended to raise funds for house building mission trips to Juárez, Mexico.
    This year’s event will kick off at 2:30 p.m. Aug. 27 in Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Dr.  
    For the past five years, House of Hope has raised money to fund their annual trips Juárez, where Los Alamos women have built houses for the needy.

  • Get on the bus! Last week, I rode the Atomic City Bus.
    I’m embarrassed to say, it was my first time. There was no particular reason for not riding the bus, it is just that I’m usually hauling lots of kids or stuff whenever I go uptown.
    I have no trouble talking to people or asking directions and I’ve certainly been on a bus, we just called it “the city bus,” in Orlando, Fla.
    How does riding the bus relate to assets?
    I was waiting to ride the bus, not having that be part of my plan to do so that day.
    I stood at the little marker awaiting my chariot, not nervous, but pondering what question I needed to ask to arrive in White Rock before the school bell rang.

  • Aspen Elementary students shared joy and sorrow as they finished off the first week of school.
    Principal Kathryn Vandenkieboom welcomed new students and a new librarian, Lisa LaPrairie-Whitacre, to the Tiger home.
    “Lisa brings a wide view of what a library is and can provide for Aspen students. We are so lucky to have her.” Vandenkieboom said. “She is making the library the heart of our school.”
    LaPrarie-Whitacre spent many hours this summer weeding, rearranging and cataloging new books to prepare to meet her new flock of readers last week. Then came the rain.
    According to Vandenkieboom, water flowed in through the windows, onto the tops of the bookshelves, and down four bookshelves, soaking the carpet.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Pardon our construction. We are installing solar hot water, so the shelter has been closed to prevent accidents. If you need some help, call a volunteers at 412-3451.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.

  • At long last, 10 Russian High School students from Sarov, Russia, Los Alamos’ sister city, are in town. This much anticipated, two-week visit was originally scheduled for late June, early July, but had to be postponed at the last minute because of the Las Conchas Fire. But now they’re here.
    The students, accompanied by two chaperones, are learning about life in the city and are touring other parts of Northern New Mexico, including Santa Fe, Taos and Bandelier National Monument. All the visitors are staying with local host families, some of which include Los Alamos youth who visited Sarov last summer.

  • Thank you Los Alamos!
    Members of the Los Alamos NJROTC stand with a final figure of donations collected at their benefit car wash in July. The total proceeds of $885.20 from this activity were forwarded to the New Mexico chapter of the American Red Cross. Lt. Cmdr. Wesley Shumaker, the group’s commander, said the unit is grateful for the generosity of the community in this effort.

  • During the last week in June, when the Las Conchas Fire threatened Los Alamos, T. Edward Vives, director of the Los Alamos Community Winds, was inspired to compose, “New Mexico Firefighters March ­— Whatever it Takes.”
    The music is dedicated to Chief Doug Tucker and the Los Alamos Fire Department. The premier performance of the piece by the LACW will be at an appreciation event for firefighters involved in the Las Conchas fire. The event will be from 4-6 p.m. Aug. 25 at Ashley Pond.

  • When Shelby Tisdale became director of the Millicent Rogers Museum in 2002, she learned that it had a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation, Inc., for an exhibition and book on its jewelry collection. Two directors had come and gone since the grant was awarded, so Tisdale decided it was time to tackle the project.
    It was a monumental undertaking. Millicent Rogers collected 1,281 pieces of jewelry — nearly 30 percent of her entire collection. In her book “Fine Indian Jewelry of the Southwest: The Millicent Rogers Museum Collection,” Tisdale writes, “Almost as if she was collecting for a museum, Millicent Rogers selected examples of Native American and Hispano arts and crafts of exceptional significance, quality and diversity.”

  • The Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra announces the rehearsal schedule for the Fall Concert at 7 p.m., Oct. 21 at the Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road.
    All rehearsals will be from 7-9:30 p.m. Mondays in the High School band room located in the music wing of Los Alamos High School.
    Interested musicians should contact their section leaders for confirmation. The leaders are as follows:
    Violin and viola, Brian Newnam, 662-9679, soundpost@q.com; cello and double bass, James Knudson, 672-9837; winds, Jane Gerheart, 672-9840, gerheart@earthlink.net; brass, Phil Jones, 662-9670, pwjones@lanl.gov; and percussion, Stuart Bloom, 672-0889, sbbloom69@yahoo.com.

  • The Los Alamos Rotary club seeks area professionals or business people for a goodwill exchange to South Africa.
    Rotarians of Rotary District 5520, which includes New Mexico and West Texas, are seeking four outstanding professionals to visit the Capetown area in South Africa between April 10  and  May 7, 2012 as part of the Group Study Exchange program of The Rotary Foundation.
    Through the program, teams of professionals exchange visits between paired areas in different countries. During the visit, team members share personal knowledge of their own country and experience the customs, vocations and lifestyles of another.

  • At 7 p.m. Friday, the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series show will be at Del Norte Credit Union with Texas musician, Carolyn Wonderland.
    The show will be Los Alamos Credit Unions’ Night— a night with Del Norte Credit Union, Zia Credit Union and the Los Alamos Schools Credit Union.
    Wonderland is best known as a  blues-rocker, but she’s a lot more than that, according to concert promoter Russ Gordon.
    “She’s often compared to Janis Joplin, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Bonnie Raitt and Susan Tedeschi,” Gordon said. “She’s a tremendous singer and guitar player that also plays slide guitar, mandolin, trumpet and piano.

  • Violinist Kay Newnam will welcome two friends to The Coffeehouse at Fuller Lodge at 7 p.m. Friday.  Pianist Anthony Maroudas and French horn player Erica Otero, along with Newnam, will perform chamber music by Paul Hindemith, Edvard Grieg and Johannes Brahms.
    “One of the most special experiences any musician can have is playing music with friends,” Newnam said. “Pianist Anthony Maroudas and French horn player Erica Otero are very special musicians and I am lucky that they are here for a performance.”

  • Is your child’s rock collection taking over? Do you wonder what all those rocks actually are? Kids in third through fifth grade and their parents are welcome to bring their rocks to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 5 p.m. Sunday for a rock identification workshop.
    With guidance from local geologists, kids will learn to identify the more familiar rocks in their collections and figure out some of the unusual ones. They will also have the opportunity to organize their collections into a box and make labels and a key. Parents are welcome to help.

  • Piñon Ridge Crafters have joined with state parks volunteers to put on an event, the El Vado Day and Crafts Fair scheduled for Aug. 27 on the shore of El Vado Lake, a 17-mile drive west of Tierra Amarilla on Hwy. 112.
    The Crafts Fair will run all day, featuring local handmade art ranging from paintings and jewelry to furniture making. The day’s program begins at 9 a.m. with the Butterfly Dancers from the Jicarilla Apache Nation.
    The day is filled with programs highlighting everything from the history of the area’s sheepherding and weaving tradition, to the events leading to the establishment of the original village and its demise some years later.