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Features

  • It appears to be an open-and-shut case. A 19-year-old man is being tried for stabbing his father and most of the members of the jury seem to agree that the man is guilty. All except for one.

  • The idea for this month’s Brown Bag originally was a Valentines’ Day themed concert but the schedule pushed the concert to January. Despite the concert being earlier than the holiday dedicated to love, soprano Viera Moore, violinist David Moore and pianist Cindy Little are still focusing their music on romance.

    The Brown Bag concert, titled “Meditation and Remembrance of Women’s Loves and Lives,” is scheduled for 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.

  • History is not written in stone. There are many different perspectives and views on the story of how we got to where we are today. And the more that is discovered about the past, the more elaborate the story becomes.

    Take New Mexico’s history,  for instance; if you dig deep enough a multitude of colors begin to paint the picture of the state.

  • Two local authors will sign their books from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday at Otowi Station Bookstore.

    David McNeese, a descendant of a first family of New Mexico, will sign “The Wind in the Trees,” and Tom Steward will sign “Into Solitary Places,” an account of devastating mental illness.

    David McNeese

  • When it comes to humanitarian work, there is never a lapse on things to do. Jean and John Lyman know this first hand; whether it is helping out rice farmers in Cambodia or volunteering at the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints church in England, the Lymans have traveled the globe to offer their services.

  • The Los Alamos Arts Council gets romantic with its newest concert, which features soprano Viera Moore, violinist David Moore and pianist Cindy Little. The show will be held at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.

  • When “Fried Green Tomatoes” came out in 1991, every woman in America loved it. It was immediately heralded as the ultimate “chick flick,” and no wonder. It has four strong female leads.

    It focuses on women’s stories and women’s problems. It features a really lovely man, who dies, and an absolutely terrible man, who also dies. Men didn’t like the film much at all.

  • Off and on throughout his life, Henry Finney has made art. It was not, however, his first profession. “I was a sociologist … for 20 years (but) I’ve been making art all my life,” he said.

    It would become a major part of his life. Finney realized that while working as a sociologist was rewarding, it “did not satisfy the right side of my mind.”

    There was another side to Finney that needed to be expressed.

  • It’s only 8:48 a.m. and I’ve already eaten twice today. I just destroyed some miniature peanut butter cracker sandwiches. I had breakfast less than two hours ago, but I’ve reached the stage in life where I need to eat miniature peanut butter cracker sandwiches, or bunny-shaped grahams or cheese quesadillas or hamburgers, about six times per day. I’ve reached that stage where my New Year’s resolution necessarily is to gain weight, at least until July.

    At which point, I plan to leave the kitchen long enough to give birth to a baby.

  • In the ‘80s, the search for the new business paradigm shift was going full steam. Businesses yearned to find new and better work models that would reap the most awards. Today, a paradigm shift of sorts is arriving in Los Alamos. The community is being introduced to a type of business that while not new, it is certainly unique in Los Alamos.  

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  • Molly Jean Willms was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for December.

    Willms invited her choir teacher Paula Nichols to join her in accepting this honor, because, Willms said, “Mrs. Nichols brings out the best in her students and is a joy to be around.”

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one outstanding student from the current Los Alamos High School graduating class to honor each month of the school year.

    Students are selected on the basis of their academics, extracurricular activities and their service to the community.

  • The Art Center at Fuller Lodge exhibition, “Roots of Culture in Northern New Mexico,” presents an opportunity to explore the meaning, not of the word root, as one might expect, but the word culture.

  • The nominations are in for the first annual Assets in Action community awards ceremony to be held Friday.

    The many residents nominated represent businesses, individuals, couples, students and youth.

    Throughout December, we have looked at the Assets category of support and those nominated through the process demonstrate support across the board.

  • On Jan. 9, the Los Alamos Concert Association brings Trio Solisti, the group The New Yorker magazine calls “the most exciting piano trio in America,” to Los Alamos.  Trio Solisti will begin performing at 8 p.m. in the Duane Smith Auditorium, and a reception will follow the concert.

    Trio Solisti,  or “three soloists,” is comprised of violinist Maria Bachmann, cellist Alexis Pia Gerlach and pianist Jon Klibonoff. They are acclaimed artists in their own right, who share a common vision.  

  • If your're looking for some conversation, a way to satisfy curiosity or just make a connection, there is a simple to accomplish these objectives. Just sit down to dinner.

    For several years, the Our Lady of the Woods has hosted a dinner the first Friday of every month. The event is not to escape the chore of cooking at home but to provide outreach to the community.

    Rowan, the high priestess of Our Lady of the Woods, explained while the local Wiccan coven opens its Sabbaths to the community, the events do not really give participants an opportunity to socialize.

  • If your're looking for some conversation, a way to satisfy curiosity or just make a connection, there is a simple to accomplish these objectives. Just sit down to dinner.

    For several years, the Our Lady of the Woods has hosted a dinner the first Friday of every month. The event is not to escape the chore of cooking at home but to provide outreach to the community.

    Rowan, the high priestess of Our Lady of the Woods, explained while the local Wiccan coven opens its Sabbaths to the community, the events do not really give participants an opportunity to socialize.

  • The newest exhibit at Mesa Public Library, “Castles and Clans collection,” reflects not only the beauty of  Scottish castles but a personal tie to the artists. Painter Karol Mack of Santa Fe and writer Brian Mack of  Estes Park, Colo., both have Scottish ancesters and have traveled extensively throughout the country.

    Their work, which extended over 10 years, has been accumulated into a book, “Scotland: Castles and Clans the Legends.” Karol’s oil paintings illustrate the book Brian wrote.

  • I’ll confess I don’t know much about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories. In fact, I really only have two bits of information. The fictional detective has a friend named Dr. Watson and resides at Baker Street.

    It seems I am in the minority. When doing a search on the Internet of Sherlock Holmes, it showed everything from a Web site for a Sherlock Holmes society to sites about this year’s movie starring Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law.