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Features

  • If you have elementary age students, this week, I hope you look at your teachers a little differently.
    If you have been mad because there was too much or not enough homework; if you push too hard and they don’t push enough, or the other way around, I hope you stop and think.
    Who would have thought that there would ever come a day that the teacher on whose doorstep you dropped your children off at this morning, could become the shield between them and a gunman?
    The questions won’t be answered simply or quickly, but we need to have some discussions.
    We need to stop complaining about everything and everyone, all the time. We need to stop posting every negative thought and idea on Facebook and Twitter.
    Pick two or three friends that you have hard conversations with, the conversations when you pour your troubles and travails out and then keep your thoughts to yourself.
    Stop the vitriol that every negative thought has to be broadcast every minute of everyday. If you need a place to vent frustrations, if nothing seems to remedy itself, then find a member of the clergy no matter what your background or talk to a counselor or a psychiatrist.

  • Recent visitors to Pajarito Environmental Education Center may have noticed some new faces crafting children’s games, managing the menagerie of live critters and writing pleas and grants for money.  
    To meet PEEC’s expanding needs, Katie Watson has accepted a new position as executive director, while Angelique Harshman is education programs director and Beth Cortright is nature center coordinator.
    Watson began her career at PEEC as program director in 2010.  She increased the number of public programs and worked to create and offer outdoor education programs for the Los Alamos Public Schools, both at individual schools and at PEEC.  
    She obtained grants for PEEC to create the Pajarito Plateau Field Science curriculum, which enables all elementary grade classes to do standards-based science programs in their schoolyards or trails.
    Watson will continue to plan public programs for PEEC, but will also focus on management and fundraising for the organization.  She has a degree from St John’s College, where she added search and rescue to the Great Books curriculum.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.  Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.Thank you, Los Alamos. The past couple weeks have seen numerous adoptions — hopefully this trend will continue and all the shelter pets will find homes for the holidays.

  •  

    It takes many “elves” to make our community event a huge success. Thank you to everyone who played an “elf” role this year for the Children’s Christmas Bazaar at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church. We had 77 elves that setup, cleaned up, wrapped gifts, greeted and helped children shop, baked treats and served coffee.  

    One hundred-sixty children attended our event and we hope that the joy they receive in giving their gifts will continue with them throughout the year. Allowing children the opportunity to make decisions on their purchases is the gift of empowerment. 

    Thank you to our community for the donations that make this event possible. It is truly the ultimate in recycling and re-gifting.

  •  

    Today

    The holiday Farmers Market will be at Fuller Lodge.

     

    Mesa Public Library presents “Poetry Gatherings,” at 6:30 p.m. in the upstairs rotunda.

     

    The White Rock Family Friendly Series presents “Brave,” at 6:30 p.m. in the White Rock Town Hall.

    Friday

  •  

    The Chamisa Cheetahs would like to send people off for holiday shopping, with some baked goods Saturday.

    The sixth graders are working to raise funds for field trips and will bake and craft their way to success.

    From 10 a.m.-3 p.m., the community can start their day by buying baked goods, other healthy treats and a variety of handcrafted items, to aid their efforts. 

    Brandi Weiss is one of the students fundraising to make a difference, by creating items made from Para Cord.

  •  

    Construct and raise beds and plant seeds for the Co-op Hoop House, an educational green house and satellite site for the Los Alamos Youth Food Project.  

    Volunteers will start building at 1 p.m. and clean up by 3 p.m. Sunday at the Co-op. The Middle School Green Team will be among the volunteers working on the raised beds. Hoop House project partners include The Family YMCA, The Los Alamos Co-op, Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board. The project was made possible by funding from Los Alamos community members, State Farm Youth Advisory Board and United Way. The Co-op will provide a light snack and warm cider for participants. 

  • The Celtic Christmas Showdown concerts this weekend features two Texas
    State Celtic-Dulcimer Champions, vying to see which musician can out-perform the other.  
    The concert will feature Celtic aires, Christmas carols and Appalachian blues.
    The Celtic Christmas Showdown concert tour opened last weekend at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame with a benefit concert for the Tulsa School of Arts and Sciences.  The tour continued to Springfield, Mo. with a benefit concert for the Breast Cancer Foundation of the Ozarks.
    The Celtic dulcimer is a stringed instrument, held on the lap and picked or strummed.  Celtic immigrants to Appalachia more than 200 years ago, invented the dulcimer.
    Wendy Songe, from Oklahoma, won the 2012 Texas State Dulcimer Championship and New Mexico’s Jonathan Dowell won that contest in 2008.  Both of these musicians are also winners of the Southern Regional Championship, Dowell in 2007 and Songe in 2012.  
    The concert will unite these two musicians in a friendly mock competition. Tessa Dowell performing pennywhistle and bodhran (Irish drum), will join the duo.
    Together, these musicians call themselves Dually Noted. The Dually Noted Celtic Christmas Showdown CD with more than 50 minutes of aires andcarols, will be available at the concerts and online at wendysonge.com.

  • Chimayó is best known for red chile and El Santuario de Chimayó, but a group of local artists is hoping to soon be included in that list.
    Joan and Lowlow Medina, along with their daughters Anamaria and Marisol, will be part of a holiday art show at the their gallery from 6-8 p.m. Friday.  
    Along with the Medina family, Fernando Bimonte, Alfredo Baca, Charles Medina and Sharon Candelario will also show their work.
    The Medinas are no strangers to the art world. In fact, Joan and their daughters were part of the “Her Legacy” art show at the Bond House Museum in Española in March.
    Joan and Lowlow have been doing art for 30 years as a couple and got their start on a different kind of media — and what some might consider an unconventional way.
    “Lowlow and I started by painting murals on cars. He did murals on walls and on wood or canvas, then he got me into painting on canvas, too,” Joan said of their artistic beginnings.
    The couple’s children were exposed to art at early ages.
    “My two daughters stated at the age of three. Now Ana is 17 and Marisol is eight,” Joan said.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Española

    McDonald’s, 618 N. Riverside Dr.
    Date inspected: Dec. 6, complaint
    Violations: One high-risk violation for inadequate cooking/cooling — investigated complaint regarding raw chicken nugget served to customer. NMED representative and manager confirmed/witnessed the raw nuggets in box brought in to NMED. Staff was shocked. Discussed possible mishandling/cooking by removing from fryer (interruption of cooking process). NMED and manager observed fry cook fry nuggets and observed process, which is timed. Potentially possible that wrong fry basket was removed early from the frying process. It is possible that multiple baskets were in operation and removed early. Manager to address cooking/frying times with staff. Violation corrected. Temps OK, nuggets holding at 156-170 degrees. Refrigeration OK.
    Note: Facility is old. Needs paint, sealing of cracks in backroom/storage area. Overall clean facility.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Trujillo Farms (processor), 1027 Railroad Ave.
    Date inspected: Dec. 5
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Santa Fe

  • The Los Alamos Mountaineers will celebrate another year with a potpourri of their members’ 2012 accomplishments during the Dec. 19 meeting.
    During the past year, the club offered 43 official outings and members had innumerable adventures of their own.
    To wrap up the year, the potpourri features six 10-minute talks chosen from adventures on at least four continents, from the American Southwest to Peru, Nepal, Wales and Mexico and in environments ranging from winter in the high mountains of Colorado, to the slick rock deserts of southern Utah.
    Only six talks can be chosen from the many offered.
    The club board is not yet sharing their picks.
    The meeting will also feature holiday cookies, cakes and pies.
    Club members are asked to bring a contribution to the dessert buffet.
    The Mountaineers welcome the public and visitors are invited to join the buffet and meeting as guests.
    The December meeting will be in the Great Room of Fuller Lodge, beginning with a business meeting at 7:30 p.m. and the potpourri at 8 p.m.
    Members should bring their desserts by 7:15 p.m., to allow time for setup.
    The Mountaineers offers trips that range from easy hikes to technical mountaineering and is committed to safe outdoor practices.

  • On behalf of the Rotary Club of Los Alamos, I would like to thank the members of the Los Alamos Garden Club for their generous donation in support of the Los Alamos High School Memorial Garden, a project to which Rotary has devoted three years of planning and fundraising.  
    Doris Jackson, a member of the Garden Club and an accomplished floral designer, presented the check to Skip King, committee chair for the Memorial Garden project, at a recent Rotary meeting.
    The dedication for the Memorial Garden, to which the community is cordially invited, is currently scheduled to take place Dec. 20.
    Again, Rotary thanks the Los Alamos Garden Club for its thoughtful donation and kind support of this meaningful addition to the Los Alamos landscape.
    Sincerely,

    Linda Hull, president
    Rotary Club of
    Los Alamos

    The Los Alamos Garden Club wants to thank the Los Alamos National Bank for allowing them to hold their annual wreath sale in the bank lobby on Nov. 30.  We also thank the Los Alamos residents who supported the sale.
    The proceeds from the sale support the club’s scholarship fund.

    Thanks,

    Sally Warner,
    first vice president, LAGC

  •    Toni Batha, a senior at Los Alamos High School, was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for November.  Batha is the daughter of Margo and Steve and sister of Benjamin Batha.
       The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one student each month of the school year to honor as Student of the Month.
    In addition to high school seniors, high school juniors are now eligible for the recognition. Students are nominated by their teachers and chosen on the basis of their academic achievement, extra-curricular activities, and, in particular, their service to the community.
       An accomplished member of the LAHS Hilltalker Speech and Debate Team, Batha has served the award-winning club for five years, coordinating community service projects and team practices, mentoring new members and organizing three statewide tournaments.
    Significantly, Batha is one of several Hilltalkers who successfully established a speech and debate team at Los Alamos Middle School.
      Teen Court, a peer-to-peer counseling sentencing program for teens in Los Alamos County, has also benefited from Batha’s volunteer service.  
    She has served in capacities as judge, jury monitor, defender and prosecutor and has also worked with parents, teens and LAHS staff to provide a plan to address truancy issues.

  • This week, I have elected to continue promoting the efforts of youth is our community, through shopping.
    That’s right, many upcoming holidays, parties, vacations and events during this month lend themselves to gift giving.
    There is a strategy in place that says if you spend 66 of your holiday dollars locally, it will benefit the local economy and small businesses immensely.
    I’m going to take that idea one step further and ask if you can support the business of a local youth, too.
    The Small Business Development Center works annually to help young entrepreneurs start their own businesses and get their name out in public.
    Perhaps you would like to buy a hand made cross, a hand knitted scarf or portraits from a young photographer? If so, have I got a plan for you.
    Local youth like Leia Roach, Elise Koskelo, Derek Selvage, Esperanza Tapia and more have taken the time and weathered the process to become Youth Business Grant recipients.
    Need something cool for the teen in your life? Roach, of Mush Crafts, is happy to get crafty and provide you with a cool gift, at a hot price. Your tech-savvy skills should drive you to etsy.com/shop/mushcrafts.  

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    Thank you, Los Alamos. The past couple weeks have seen numerous adoptions — hopefully this trend will continue and all the shelter pets will find homes for the holidays.
    DOGS
    Axle — Don’t let those sad-looking eyes fool you. Axle is a playful and affectionate neutered male. The shelter temperament testers describe this Pit-mix as a “total sweetheart.” He would love a family that appreciates big, sloppy dog kisses.  
    Bagel — Very busy female Border Collie found on the Rim Trail, near Rover. She will need an active family to keep her happy.
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.

  • Scholastic books are for sale at The Family YMCA from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily, through Thursday. The public is welcome to come to the Y and shop. A variety of picture books to young adult novels are available.
    Partial proceeds will benefit the Y’s annual campaign that supports scholarships for those needing financial assistance.

  • On Dec. 1, the Los Alamos High School NJROTC took 42 cadets to compete against 11 other schools from New Mexico and Colorado in the Area 9 West Drill, Academic and Fitness Championships.
    They finished as follows:
    First place: Academics, overall fitness, armed drill, 16x100 relay. Second place: Unarmed regulation drill, unarmed exhibition drill, color guard, personnel inspection, 8x220 relay.
    Individual awards went to the following cadets: Academics, Felicity Kubic, first place; David Murphy, second place; Kyle Partin, fourth place. Boys push-ups: Jordi Kandarian, first place; John Gibson, fourth place.
    Girls push-ups: Tessa Snyder, third place and Melissa Wysocki, fifth place. Boys sit-ups: Jordi Kandarian, second place; Diego Cardiel, third place; Rigel Baron, fourth place. Girls sit-ups: Gianna Maggiore, first place and Rachel Barthell, second place.
    Kyle Partin took first place in the armed commander category; Richard Whittemore took first place in the individual drill dow; and Victoria Hypes took second place in the unarmed commander category
    The NJROTC took first place overall at this competition and once again, for the fourth straight year, earned a spot to compete at the Regional Competition in Kansas City on Feb. 23.

  • The Village of Jemez Springs will officially kick off the holiday season with a series of events and festivities around town on Saturday.
    The day begins at 3 p.m. with the traditional performance by the Albuquerque Boys Choir, at Our Lady of the Assumption Church, across from the state monument. Elliot Higgins and the Hummingbird music camp facilitate the annual event. Admission is free.
    The community Holiday festivities in the park start at 4:30 p.m. with music performed by local kids and an opportunity for families to help decorate the Christmas tree. Musicians include Sage Mijares with her young Suzuki violin students. Mijares will also perform with her siblings, Noah and Isabella. Music students from Jemez Valley public schools will also perform.
    Santa will arrive at the gazebo at 5 p.m., followed by the annual Christmas tree lighting and caroling at 5:30 p.m. Friends of the Library will offer baked goods and free warm drinks, in the conference room, next to the library.
    From 5-9 p.m., the state monument hosts the annual luminaria event among the ruins of the old Gisewa pueblo and San Jose de los Jemez Mission Church. The event is free and includes hundreds of traditional luminarias, Native American flute music and Jemez pueblo dancers.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Café Sushi, 3801 Arkansas Ave.
    Date inspected: Nov. 27
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — sanitizer > 200 ppm. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Daniel’s Café, 800 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Nov. 27
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — Coke nozzles need cleaning. One low-risk violation for poor personal hygiene — hair restraints, all food handlers must wear a cap or hair net.
    Notes: Have prep refrigerator serviced.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    El Parasol, 1903 Central Ave.
    Date inspected: Nov. 27
    Violations: None
    Notes: Excellent facility.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Española

    Advantage Sweets/Baskin Robbins, 1111 N. Riverside Dr.
    Date inspected: Nov. 28
    Violations: None
    Notes: Hair restraints must be used in food prep/service areas. No exceptions. Noted staff using hair restraints, good. Gloves, good. Facility doing good.

  • Most artists will say that sharing their talent with others is what drives them to create art. Española resident and artist Monica Duran is no different. She feeds her creative need by making contemporary art pieces, using mixed media — and for the second time, she will share her artwork with the public in a show.
     This time, it will be on exhibit at the Bond House Museum in Española. The show opens with a reception from 6-9 p.m. Friday and will be on display through Jan. 3.
    Despite the fact that she enjoys making art, she’s not able to devote as much time as she’d like to create her pieces because she’s battling terminal cancer. The proceeds from selling her art will go toward her cancer foundation. She is in need of surgery that could save her life.
    “I decided to show it (my art) because I felt in my spirit that it was time. I wanted other women to read my story and not give in to the illness,” Duran said. “I know first-hand that this can either make you or break you and I choose to fight to make it. Art is my passion and I love to create wonderful and beautiful things.”