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Features

  • A quick drive through Taos yields little more than scenic beauty. However, that’s one of the things that attracts visitors to the town. Taking time to explore the downtown area will reveal not only a place that’s rich in history, but also an extensive art scene.
    Those who have visited — and fell in love with — Santa Fe are sure to enjoy Taos. Surrounded by the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the area offers a variety of outdoor activities such as skiing, hiking, fishing, whitewater rafting, climbing, llama trekking, camping, horseback riding and of course, a plethora of art galleries, shops and restaurants.

  • Some staff members at Los Alamos Middle School are working hard to build the 40 Developmental Assets in students — and one is igniting a passion and making learning fun.
    Los Alamos Middle School teacher Caroline Haagenstad builds on the passions of her students with the GATE Passion Project, work that takes place throughout the school year.
    Recently, students had their projects on display and one definitely stood out.
    It’s not everyday that a student is encouraged to graffiti a school, but teacher Naomi Unger urged seventh grade student Evan Oro to do just that.
    The project was done through a process, which included involvement from Los Alamos Middle School Principal Rex Kilburn.

  • Good community citizens are not hard to come by in our small town.  We have those who care for the elderly and those who care for the very young.  The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation wishes to express its sincere thanks to the longtime proprietors of Central Avenue Grill, Min and Monica Park.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will have shorter hours for its free Nature Playtimes starting in June, and will also have a new teacher for the preschool program.  
    PEEC’s Nature Playtimes offer a chance for the youngest kids to get out and enjoy nature on the Pajarito Plateau.
    Each session offers time to explore outside, a craft or sensory activity and stories and songs. The program is free and open to all, with no registration required.  
    Nature Playtimes have been running from 10-11:30 a.m. on Mondays.  Beginning June 4, the structured part of the program will be from 10-11 a.m.  

  • Barnabas Collins has risen once again and is stalking the town of Collinsport, Maine.
    Director Tim Burton and actor Johnny Depp have teamed up yet again to bring all that is creepy, dark and sinister to the silver screen. This time, their efforts have resulted in “Dark Shadows.”
    Based on the TV series that ran from 1966-1971, the movie revolves around Barnabas (Depp), an imprisoned vampire, forced to live in a coffin underground, as punishment for scorning the witchy Angelique Bouchard (Eva Green), with whom he had an affair two centuries prior to his imprisonment.

  • Imagine a place where technology does not exist. There are no smart phones, e-readers, computers, Internet connections or even telephones. It’s a place where people cultivated gardens to grow food to feed the family, raised livestock and depended on wood to heat their homes.
    Such a place may seem like a distant memory or something out of a story about the Wild West, but it does exist. It’s called El Rancho de las Golondrinas and it’s located on the outskirts of Santa Fe, tucked away from the interstate traffic and hustle and bustle of downtown. Located on 200 acres of farmland, the living history museum is dedicated to showing visitors how 18th and 19th century New Mexicans lived.

  • Teens attend a Co-op Rocks event at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Saturday. Youth played games with Assets In Action, spoke with representatives from the Los Alamos Historical Museum, learned about second-hand smoke and rocked out with bands. The band seen here is made up of members of the Teen Center staff including Director Michelangelo Lobato, left. LACM Outreach Coordinator Sandra West pulled together the event with the help of teens.

  • Self Help, Inc., a Los Alamos non-profit organization, plans a June 1 launch for 2-1-1, an online and telephone information and referral service.
    The service aims to connect people searching for help and social service agencies around Rio Arriba, Taos and Los Alamos counties with the appropriate agency.
    The 2-1-1 service is sponsored and supported by United Way of Northern New Mexico and links to other United Way agency-sponsored 2-1-1 centers throughout the country.
    The service is free and easy to use.  Anyone seeking a general service or a specific agency can dial 211, 855-662-6211 (toll free) or 662-6211 (Los Alamos).  

  • Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series presents Frances Levine speaking on the topic of colonial New Mexico’s history at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
     In this New Mexico Centennial year, Levine will touch briefly on the 100 years of New Mexico’s statehood and then explore Gov. Bernardo López de Medizábal’s wife, Doña Teresa’s role in the state’s colonial past.

    About Doña Teresa de Aguilera
    y Roche:

  • As I have said before, generally it takes more than a one-time lesson or event for something to become a learned behavior.
    On Monday, students of the Chamisa Elementary sixth grade leadership team became the teachers as they presented, “All Kids Can.”
    The All Kids Can assembly was another opportunity to educate kids and adults, that the “R” word is wrong. The “R” word in this case is retarded.
    The team made up of Robyn, Priyanka, Sean, Colin, Youssef and Jenny, with the assistance of parent Rebecca Hollis and Chamisa Elementary Teacher Jennifer Kieltyka walked the audience through the thought process of why saying the word retarded, even as a joke, is wrong.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love.
    Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are microchipped.

    DOGS
    Daisy — Three year old female Rottie-mix. A nice dog, but very strong. Would benefit from leadership and calm and consistent training. Former owner says she’s good with kids.
    Ollie —Gentle, older red Chow-mix. Calm, would be good in a quiet home. She is protective of her food, so we suggest a home with children older than 12.

  • It’s no secret that teaching youngsters to read at an early age will help them in school later on. In fact, research shows that most children can read by age seven, but the foundation for learning begins at birth.
    Sigma Delta, a Los Alamos Youth Leadership team, recognizes the importance of literacy and has been trying to do its part to help youth in the community.
    For several months, the team, under the guidance of Los Alamos High School senior and LAYL member Jin Park, planned to visit LAPS elementary schools. In early May, it executed its plan, visiting Barranca Elementary.

  • Local scientist Paul Mutschlecner will give a talk at 7 p.m. May 24 at Pajarito Environmental Education Center, 3540 Orange St., about the upcoming transit of Venus across the sun.
    The talk is free and open to the public and no registration is required.  
    In addition, PEEC will have a telescope available at the center at 4 p.m. June 5 for anyone interested in watching the transit.
    Also on June 5, there will be a rare “transit of Venus” when the planet comes so precisely between the sun and the Earth that its image can be seen crossing the solar disk. The transit of Venus in June is the second of two that have occurred in the last eight years, but the next one won’t happen until 105 years from now.

  • Credit unions throughout the state are participating in a search for a young adult “spokester” who will reach out to Gen Yers ages 18-25 via social media, special events and other activities to get them on track for a lifetime of financial well-being through the Young & Free New Mexico program. The spokester must be:
    • Social media savvy
    • Video natural
    • Creative blogger
    • Self-motivated
    • A personality that pops! Dynamic, likeable and outgoing — able to talk to anyone, anywhere, anytime
    • Can create a buzz and get people talking
    • Comfortable with all things Web
    • Comfortable on camera

  • Last Friday, the Methodist Church celebrated 50 years of their skating program. Don Casperson has volunteered for almost 20 years with the program.

  • The Russ Gordon Concert Series opens at Overlook Park tonight with a pair of bands. Performing will be Tiho Dimitrov Band and DK & the Affordables. The concert, which is free, starts at 7 p.m.

  • The Los Alamos Choral Society presents their Spring Concert at 3 p.m. May 20 at the United Church of Los Alamos, featuring songs of love and romance in a program titled, “Love In Bloom.”
    From the 1959 musical “Gypsy,” with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and music by Jule Styne, comes the hit song “Everything’s Coming Up Roses.”
    Morten Lauridsen (b. 1943) — a composer from the late 20th and 21st century — has developed his trademark style of composition of which “Dirait on,” from the song cycle “Chanson Des Roses” is an example.

  • State Rep. Jim Hall stopped for a lengthy visit at Los Alamos Middle School last Tuesday. Here, seventh grade student Dylan Sanchez speaks with Hall during one of three lunch periods. Hall asked students about their education, shared details about his school life and work at the Legislature and took part in an update on the Los Alamos Youth Food Project. Hall also took time to visit staff during their luncheon hosted by Prinicpal Rex Kilburn, Assistant Principal Anna Vargas-Gutierrez and Summit Foods.

  • The hard work of many dedicated volunteers resulted in a successful Northern New Mexico Spring Arts and Crafts Fair. It was a fantastic day with perfect weather, giving people the opportunity to visit with friends and mingle among the booths.
    In addition to the Los Alamos Arts Council, the fair benefited from the efforts of RSVP members who posted flyers around Los Alamos before the fair, the Coffee House Café, Joe Baldanado  and Darcie Marino for providing the beverages and food for the event.
    We also wish to thank L.A. County Parks Department for mowing and trimming the grounds around Fuller Lodge, as well as cleaning up trash during the fair.

  • “Doing Good and Doing Well: Embodying Your Values in Your Investment Choices,” a talk by Johann Klaassen, vice president of Investment Services for First Affirmative Financial Network in Colorado Springs, will be May 21 at Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    While many people shop carefully and consciously in order to maximize their impact and minimize their footprint, relatively few people try to do the same with their savings and investments.
    Those who ask their financial advisors about investing according to their values are often discouraged — but it is possible to direct money’s power in the marketplace to shape the world according to one’s values, and this can be done without sacrificing competitive returns.