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Features

  • For the first program of its Fire Recovery Series, Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offer an exploratory hike from Ponderosa Campground at 8:30 a.m. Aug 25. Terry Foxx and Chris Judson will lead the non-strenuous hike.  It is free and open to the public, with no registration required.
    The slow-meandering walk will focus on observation and discovery of the complexity of the ecosystems of the Pajarito Plateau and the change that these ecosystems have experienced over the past 200 years.
    Judson and Foxx will discuss both the history of fire in the area and ecological recovery from fire. They will point out changes that have taken place through time from fire, urbanization and climate.
    Participants should meet at Bandelier Monument’s Ponderosa Campground on N.M. 4 at 8:30 a.m. and wear good walking shoes and bring water.
    For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • “I love and fear words — their potential to uplift or tear down. My father taught me to respect that potential. Dad, a man of few words, wrote poetry and sketched. My mother made me love stories. She’d sit at the top of the stairs every night and create magic with a book. It was reader’s theater. If mommy couldn’t be there, she assigned the reading to whomever she’d deputized to watch us that night. But no one could do it like her. So much of the writer in me is my parents’ doing. I got really lucky with them.” — Vaunda Micheaux Nelson
    It is no surprise that Nelson is New Mexico’s official Centennial Children’s Author. The author of 10 books, from a beginning reader, “Ready? Set. Raymond!” to her latest “documentary novel” for young adults and adults, Nelson simply and always with a touch of humor, tells tales that engage all ages.
    Nelson will discuss her award-winning non-fiction book for ages 7-10, “Bad News for Outlaws: the Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal,” at 7 p.m. Aug. 23 in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library, as part of the Authors Speak Series.

  • Self-Help Inc. has been the sponsor of Tools for School for 15 years and once again has completed another program. With money from United Way, other grants and donations from the community, $27,000 worth of paper, pencils, scissors and other supplies have been purchased, unloaded at the Masonic Temple in Los Alamos and then sorted and distributed to children in need throughout the Los Alamos, Española and Pojoaque school districts.
    Joyce Nickols has been the Tools for School coordinator for the last three years. Helping with Tools for School has been an annual project for the middle school and high school youth groups at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos.  
    Nickols, youth director De Anna Hoyle and the youth group had a pizza picnic and then worked several hours recently unloading a truck, donated by Remax of Los Alamos, that was filled to capacity with boxes of supplies.

  • Wednesday

    The Los Alamos School Retirees Not-Back-to-School Breakfast will be from 9:30-11 a.m. at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church’s Kelly Hall. The fully catered breakfast will cost $9. Call Judy Crocker at 662-9117, email drummer@rt66.com, or contact Emily Engel at 662-3846 or lars@ieee.org.

     

    This month’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Board meeting will be at 6 p.m. in Building #1, Camino Entrada, Pajarito Cliffs Site. Committees will meet at 6 p.m., the meeting will begin at 6:15 p.m. For more information, call 661-4097.

     

    Thursday

  • This week, my column salutes local youth Clay Adams.

    Adams is a sophomore this year and last school year, ignited a spark that changed his orbit.

    In Asset language, a spark is a hobby or passion, the thing that makes your life worth living and brings you joy.

    Last winter another local youth, Trae Randolph, taught Adams how to ride bulls — and so it began.

    Adams traveled to rodeos with Randolph, riding when he could and spending time in Jal, N.M. with his father James, indulging in bull riding whenever he had the chance.

  • Some think the Valles Caldera deserves a trail around its rim. At 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in Fuller Lodge, Dorothy Hoard will tell of her 12-year still unfinished odyssey to make the dream a reality. 

    The resurgent dome of the Valles Caldera is, geologically speaking, very young. Its structure is largely intact. It is also a small caldera, 13-15 miles in diameter, so its bowl-shape depression can be easily seen atop a mountain. These attributes led a small group of dedicated hikers to the conclusion that a caldera of this caliber deserved a trail around its rim.  

    Hoard will discuss the effort to convince land managers of the value of such a trail, the current status of the trail concept and the results of a three-year reconnaissance effort to determine the feasibility of such a trail. She will also describe the effects of the Las Conchas Fire, which burned large sections of the caldera rim in 2011. The question becomes whether the concept of a rim trail is still viable.  

  • Kiwanis awarded Michelle Boerigter the Jeannette O. Wallace Scholarship on Aug. 7. Wallace was a longtime Kiwanian and former state representative. Boerigter will attend Hope College in Holland, Mich. and will study biochemistry and religion/theology. Pictured from left to right: Key Club Members, Morrie Pongratz, Kristy Ortega (president) and Don Casperson; Terry Wallace, son of Jeannette Wallace; Michelle Boerigter; and parents Cathy and Steve Boerigter. 

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department. 

     

    Los Alamos

     

  • Internationally recognized cougar expert Ken Logan of the Colorado Parks and Wildlife division will talk at 2 p.m. Aug. 12 at Pajarito Environmental Education Center about his years of research on these animals. The talk is free and open to the public.

  • The Santa Fe Opera’s most modern sounding offering this season is Polish composer Szymanowski’s “King Roger.” 

    The piece premiered in 1926, which doesn’t make it the most recently written, but it is years away from the others, in regard to its structure and subject matter.

  • Take a snapshot of white tents on a green lawn, 100 artists, thousands of pieces of art and hundreds of shoppers and if you’re in Los Alamos, you can bet it’s the annual Fuller Lodge Art Center summer Arts and Crafts Fair. 

    Most of the vendors are full-time artists making a living from their art. About 75 percent of this year’s group were here last year and said they look forward to returning. 

  • Following the sell-out success of their second annual High Tea and Fashion Show last year, the House of Hope ladies’ mission team and the co-ed Trinity Builders team invite the community to join them again this year for a tea, followed by a fashion show. 

    The afternoon’s activities are intended to raise funds for house building mission trips to Juárez, Mexico.

  • It’s Los Alamos County Fair weekend and the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series is going to do a show of country-soul music at Ashley Pond. This means country music played with soul. If this sounds strange, think again. 

    There’s been Ray Charles with all of his country hits in the early 60s, Joe South, Joe Tex, Charlie Rich, Flying Burrito Bros., O.C. Smith’s “Little Green Apples,” Elvis, Arthur Alexander, Solomon Burke, Fats Domino, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Johnny Rivers and many others. 

  • Chamisa Elementary turns 45 this year, with Principal Debbie Smith in her third year, as the top cheetah.
    Even though the start of school is next week, Smith is eager to begin by welcoming more than 50 new families to the fold.
    What has the greatest appeal for Smith?
    “Building on our relationship with neighboring San Ildefonso Pueblo and Northern New Mexico communities, celebrating student success and providing challenging individual opportunities,” Smith said.
    Smith has spent a good portion of the summer preparing their yearlong calendar to be set before school starts, collaborating with parents, the community and working with the new PTO board.

  • The bright and smiling face of Principal Jill Gonzales is ready to greet Piñon Panthers as they enter the hallways for her third year.
    “I remain humbled and honored to serve the wonderful students, staff and parents who comprise our Panther family,” Gonzales said. “Truly, it is a blessing to work in such a highly-engaged, dynamic and supportive community.”
    Gonzales is excited and encouraged by the many opportunities the new school year brings, such as fresh starts, new experiences, higher learning and increased growth for students and staff alike.

  • Time is fleeting and you still might need to squeeze in some fun.
    Take this last week to do something fun, something just plain silly, something memorable.
    If your budget permits, get out of dodge and go do something different.
    Head up to Water World, in Denver and take advantage of a great water park. It was rated as one of Forbes Magazine’s, coolest water parks.
    Let your hair down and have a really good time. Try and surf, making a total fool of yourself and take pictures of your adventures. See what a hydro-magnetic water coaster is, if you feel the need for some science along the way. They even added a family buffet if you need to chow down while there.

  • Fuller Lodge Art Center calls their Summer Art Camp “The Best Six Weeks of Summer” and countless children from Los Alamos, surrounding communities and even foreign countries will agree. This summer, between 80 and 100 students from age four through sixth grade filled the classrooms at the Art Center each week, while teens met for classes at Village Arts. Whether painting, drawing, sculpting, dying yarn and knitting or creating things from recycled materials, these young artists were exploring their creativity with enthusiasm and laughter.

  • Those that are into robotics will have an opportunity to exhibit their favorite robot as well as their home preserves, garden produce and quilts.
    Though pre-registration for the fair was Friday, gardeners, bakers, quilters and artists can still enter their submissions for the Los Alamos County Fair.
    The County Fair and Rodeo runs Aug.9-12. Anyone living or working in Los Alamos County is eligible to enter. Exhibit categories include: culinary (baked items), preserved foods, hobbies and crafts, fine arts, photography, quilts, clothing, knitting, crochet, needlework, horticulture and 4-H projects. Age categories range from age five, up to seniors.

  • The League of Women Voters will have their monthly luncheon at 11:45 a.m. Thursday. The speaker will be Los Alamos Police Chief Wayne Torpy.
    The luncheon will be at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, 3540 Orange St. (small building across from the back of the high school).
    Ruby K’s will provide food. A sandwich or salad can be ordered when you RSVPing. Chips, pickles and cookies will accompany the meal and water will be provided.
    The total cost is $12, which includes tax and gratuity. Looking ahead, the September Lunch with a Leader event will be catered at Mesa Library Sept. 13.

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offer its final Summer Family Evenings program for 2012 at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.  
    Sallye Sibbitt  of the Duck Buddies, will visit with information about ducks, duck crafts and giveaways and live ducks.
    Duck Buddies is a volunteer group formed to help the ducks at Ashley Pond.
    They have cared for the ducks for many years and most recently, assisted with the design for the Ashley Pond renovations that were recently approved by the County Council.