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Features

  • The Boys Scouts of America and NALC-4112 Letter Carriers will conduct their 15th annual Fall Food Drive throughout Los Alamos County Saturday, to benefit LA Cares Food Bank in Los Alamos and St. Martin de Porres Soup Kitchen in Española.
    The annual Fall Food Drive is scheduled for Los Alamos and White Rock and is jointly conducted by the Los Alamos Letter Carriers Union (NALC-4112), the Northern New Mexico District of the Boy Scouts of America, LA CARES and the LA Community Food Banks with the support of the National Letter Carriers Union, the Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Smith’s Food and Drug Stores, the Los Alamos postmaster and many individual volunteers.
    Residents should place non-perishable donations of food and supplies near their mailboxes by 10 a.m. (no glass containers).
    Cub Scouts will also collect donations at both Smith’s supermarket locations in Los Alamos and White Rock on Saturday only.

  • FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Victoria’s Secret has apologized for putting a Native American-style headdress on a model for its annual fashion show, after the outfit was criticized as a display of ignorance toward tribal culture and history.
    The company responded to the complaints over the weekend by saying it was sorry to have upset anyone and that it wouldn’t include the outfit in the show’s television broadcast next month, or in any marketing materials.
    “We sincerely apologize as we absolutely had no intention to offend anyone,” the company said.
    Headdresses historically are a symbol of respect, worn by Native American war chiefs and warriors. For many Plains tribes, for example, each feather placed on a headdress has significance and had to be earned through an act of compassion or bravery. Some modern-day Native American leaders have been gifted war bonnets in ceremonies accompanied by prayers and songs.
    “When you see a Lakota chief wearing a full headdress, you know that he was a very honorable man. He was a leader. He did a lot of honorable things for his people,” said Michelle Spotted Elk, a Santa Cruz, Calif., woman of mixed heritage whose husband is Lakota.

  • LONDON (AP) — Britain’s media are in a meltdown and its government is gaffe-prone, so Oxford Dictionaries has chosen an apt Word of the Year: “omnishambles.”
    Oxford University Press on Tuesday crowned the word — defined as “a situation that has been comprehensively mismanaged, characterized by a string of blunders and miscalculations” — its top term of 2012.
    Each year Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that best reflects the mood of the year. The publisher typically chooses separate British and American winners. This year’s American champion is “gif,” short for graphics interchange format, a common format for images on the Internet.
    The editors said gif was being recognized for making the crucial transition from noun to verb, “to gif”: to create a gif file of an image or video sequence, especially relating to an event. And, inevitably, to share it online. Cute kittens, Olympic champions, President Obama — they’ve all been giffed.
    Coined by writers of the satirical television show “The Thick of It,” omnishambles has been applied to everything from government PR blunders to the crisis-ridden preparations for the London Olympics.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Café Castro, 2811 Cerrillos Road
    Date inspected: Nov. 8
    Violations: None
    Notes: Dishwasher sanitizing solution 75 ppm, good. Test strips are available. Kitchen is kept very clean all the time. Good process of cooling down food. Cutting boards and equipment surfaces look clean. Store raw meats at the bottom shelves of refrigeration units.
    Status of establishment: Approved

    Domino’s Pizza, 604 N. Guadalupe St.
    Date inspected: Nov. 6
    Violations: Two moderate-risk violations, one for improper holding — food-grade thermometer needs to be calibrated; one for contaminated equipment — pizza cutter unsanitary condition; sandwich cutter unsanitary condition, broken.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    El Merendero Processing, 1514 Rodeo Road
    Date inspected: Nov. 7
    Violations: One low-risk violation for ventilation/lighting — light out of order in the walk-in refrigerator.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Flying Tortilla, 4250 Cerrillos Road
    Date inspected: Nov. 6

  • The original Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair is just around the corner and this year, it will be at a new venue.
    A Los Alamos tradition for 45 years, the annual Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair will be from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday at the Crossroads Bible Church — a new venue, as the middle school is being remodeled.
    The Los Alamos Arts Council is hosting the event and admission is free.
    To keep the tradition of a pre-Thanksgiving, holiday shopping spree alive, the LAAC has lined up artists from across New Mexico and nearby regions.
    As in past years, jewelry, pottery, painting, metal work, fabric arts and photography will be among the highlights, as well as a wide range of holiday-oriented crafts.
    New artists and longtime favorites will be on hand. Kathy Hjeresen, who sells handmade jewelry and woodworker Adrian Martinez, both veterans of the fair will return. Mary Ann Somers and Marilyn Lisowski, two more local jewelers, will also be at the fair.
    Fiber arts will be represented, including Hillary Harrell, who will have wool scarves and shawls. Los Alamos fiber artist Jeanne Robinson and her daughter Elise Koskelo, will also have knit wear, wraps and shawls. Susan Young Tweet will be back with her fleece items for both adults and children.

  • Ending world hunger is not something that one can do alone. In fact, it sometimes takes an entire community to make a difference.
    The CROP Hunger Walk/Turkey Trot is one of those events that is trying make a difference. For the past several years, Lynn Wysocki-Smith has organized the event, in the hope of helping ease poverty and hunger. This year’s event will be at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Los Alamos Middle School. The two-and-a-half mile walk or run is free, but donations of canned food or money are welcome.
    Wysocki-Smith said the Turkey Trot was started more than “30 years ago, as the season finale event of the Atomic City Road Runner Club. It was always held either the Saturday or Sunday prior to Thanksgiving Day and has always been conducted out on North Mesa. It was a runners-only event, with the course being a fairly tough course, starting somewhere near the Los Alamos Posse Shack and going down into the canyon and then returning to the start by climbing out of the canyon behind the Posse Shack. There were a few turkeys given to best time predictors.”

  • Los Alamos High School will participate in the American Mathematics Competition Feb. 5 at Los Alamos High School.
    The mission of the Mathematical Association of America in offering this competition is to increase interest in mathematics and to develop problem solving.  
    Teachers and schools benefit from the chance to challenge students with mathematical questions that are aligned with curriculum standards at all levels of difficulty.
    Students gain the opportunity to learn and achieve through competition with students in their school and from around the world.
    The AMC offers a contest with an emphasis on problem solving, not just computation.  The problems are for all students with a mix of questions.
    Top students can receive recognition through honors and awards, including the best in each school and the best in each state.
    A $5 fee is due at sign-up, which will go through Nov. 28. Interested high school students may sign up in the Math Office, Room A212.
    More information and practice options may be found at amc.maa.org.

  • Bryan Huysman, former NASA Manned Space Flight Center Scientist,  will be the guest speaker at the Nov. 20 dinner meeting of the Major General Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of the Military Order of World Wars in Los Alamos.  
    The meeting will be at the Hilltop House, third floor and will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    Huysman’s presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The dinner entrée is green chile chicken with mashed potatoes, vegetables, salad and roll. Cost of the dinner is $23 per person.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to the general public for the dinner and program, or the program only at no cost.
    Note that a dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner.
    RSVP for the dinner is needed by Nov. 18; call Lt. Col Gregg Giesler AUS retired, chapter commander, 662-5574 or email g.giesler@computer.org; or Lt. Col. Norman G. Wilson USAF retired, chapter adjutant, 662-9544 or email NRMWil5@cs.com.
    An Act of Congress chartered the Military Order of the World Wars in 1919 as a national patriotic organization.

  • A variety of chocolate creations were on display Saturday during the Festival of Chocolate. Attendees sampled pastries, like Morning Glory Bakery’s beignets, below, and other assorted goodies.

     

  • Los Alamos Middle School has chosen to participate in Read to Feed‚ a reading incentive program designed by Heifer International, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending world hunger and poverty while caring for the Earth.
    Read to Feed allows children to help find solutions to global problems like hunger and poverty.
    LAMS students will record each of the books they read on the back of a sheet, through Dec. 14. Students will ask for pledges for each book they read.  
    A “buck a book,” from their family and friends is recommended, but any amount will be accepted, no matter how small. Cash or checks will be accepted.
    Checks should be made out to LAMS with “Read to Feed” on the memo line. School district policy prohibits canvassing: going door-to-door, to collect pledges.
    The Read to Feed Committee (a group of seventh graders organizing the fundraiser) will decide what kinds of animals to buy through Heifer International.
    Heifer then decides where the need is greatest and provides families and communities with the animals they’ve purchased through the money raised.

  • The 27th annual Los Alamos Heart Council Health Fair was held at Griffith Gymnasium Oct. 27. What a tremendous success. We had close to 1,700 attendees.  
    There were 67 exhibitors representing a wide range of health-related organizations. More than 700 flu shots were given and 307 blood draws were done. Along with many other health screenings, 190 bike helmets were given out to Los Alamos and Northern New Mexico children.  
    The health fair is only possible with the support of many organizations, a large number of volunteers and the broader community. Thanks are due to the Los Alamos Heart Council Board (a United Way community partner), which has put on the health fair every year for 27 years; to the Los Alamos Medical Center, which co-sponsors and assists the Heart Council by covering the costs associated with flu shots and advertising; to the phlebotomists from the medical center; to the Los Alamos Council on Cancer which subsidizes the PSA blood test for men; to the Los Alamos Monitor that publishes the Health Fair guide; to KRSN for their support of community activities such as the Health Fair through their interviews and public service announcements; and to the Tuff Riders for help in fitting the helmets for the kids.  

  • Asset number eight is Youth as Resources — and our focus for this week.
    What ways can you involve youth in decision making? As a part of your home, school, community or business, what input can they provide to make things better?
    The Chamisa Student Council is currently collecting food items to donate to those in need — in and around our community.
    The youth work as decision makers for the school, with the leaders selected to bring the thoughts and concerns of the school to the table.
    They work on a variety of projects including taking collections for non-profits and more importantly, coming up with the list of those organizations, for which to give.
    Often adults may want input from kids, but lead them in decision making by providing all of the information.
    At Chamisa Elementary, fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade representatives staff every class from kindergarten through sixth grade to get their input.
    The students are taught how to ask questions and field answers, regardless of the responses they receive.
    The students then get the final say as to what projects they work on and when they do them.
    The leaders take full responsibility for bringing the decisions back to their classes and promoting the events as they arrive on the calendar.

  • Los Alamos MainStreet is working with the Betty Ehart Senior Center and Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA) to make this the most wonderful time of the year.

    The festivities kicked off with the Festival of Chocolate and rolls into a weeklong event called The Festival of Trees.

    All week, residents are invited to tour the Betty Ehart Senior Center and view (and in some cases) bid on silent auction items.

    While the event is free and open to the public, it is an excellent opportunity to help those in need, during the holiday season.

  • The University of New Mexico at Los Alamos will feature two opportunities for the community to view its student showcase of projects this month, at the campus.

    The first is a Greek Mythology Exhibit that will be from 1-3 p.m. Wednesday. 

    The second takes place on Thursday, with a daytime and early evening reception titled, “UNM-LA on Display.” 

    The event will feature displays and presentations from a variety of students throughout the 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 5 p.m.-8 p.m. showcase.

  • Presley Gao, 10, presented Sally Wilkins, president of Friends of the Shelter, with a $217 check for donations he received for performing a benefit concert Sept. 8.
    Gao began taking piano lessons with Dr. Madeline Williamson on his sixth birthday in 2008. Today, he is performing solo piano recitals more likely found in the repertory of concertizing pianists. 

    He has earned several awards in piano competition, including the Santa Fe Sonata Contest, the District and the New Mexico State Honors Auditions and the Dennis Alexander Piano Competition in Albuquerque. 

    For four years, he has also earned the international level (15 solos) and national level (10 solos) certificates in Guild Auditions.   

  •  While most people in the U.S. are preparing for holiday activities, Los Alamos volunteers with Operation Christmas Child — the world’s largest Christmas project of its kind — are filling shoe box gifts with toys, school supplies and hygiene items for needy children overseas. 

    This year-round project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization, Samaritan’s Purse, headed by Franklin Graham, is ramping up as local businesses, churches and community groups prepare to collect 590 gift-filled shoeboxes during National Collection Week (Nov. 12-19). 

     Anyone can drop off a packed shoebox at the Los Alamos-area collection site. Then, using whatever means necessary — trucks, trains, boats, bikes and even elephants — the shoebox gifts will be hand delivered to children in 100 countries around the world.

  • PAC 8 is hosting its annual Holiday Wine and Cheese Silent Auction and Fundraiser at 7 p.m. Nov. 16 at Fuller Lodge.

    Attendees can do some holiday shopping in one evening, while they taste wines and cheeses from around the world. Items such as sushi making lessons with sushi dinner; ski passes from Pajarito Mountain; a 12 lb. organic turkey from the Los Alamos Co-op; bagels and cream cheese for a year from Ruby K’s, artwork, jewelry, many gift certificates and more will be available for bidding.

    Rumelia, a Balkan/Folk/World female trio from Santa Fe will provide entertainment. Their music is derived from the traditional and popular tunes of Albania, Turkey, Greece, Macedonia and Bulgaria, with some Gypsy music thrown in.

  • Nov. 12-17

    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

     

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY

    BESC closed in observance of Veterans Day

    TUESDAY

    8:45 a.m. Variety training

     10:30 a.m. AARP Board mtg.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. 

    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. 

    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

    DOGS

  • Army National Guard Pvt. Jerin D. Killingsworth graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.

    During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field training exercises.

    Killingsworth is the son of Jack Killingsworth of Jemison, Ala., and Robin Dabbs of Los Alamos.

     He is a 2011 graduate of Jemison High School, Jemison, Ala.