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Features

  • Michael Mandrell, a contemporary American finger style guitarist whose orchestral compositions offer equal parts world and new age, an array of middle Eastern rhythms and scales, with tinges of folk and an infusion of Celtic overtones, will perform at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos.
     His latest recording, “Returning and Returned” is a collection of his solo guitar work that covers a wide range of styles.

  • Take a walk in the woods with Tim Althauser, as Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery presents his first solo exhibition. The opening reception will be from 5-7 p.m. Sept. 23 at Wray’s gallery, 2101 Trinity Dr., Suite B-2.
    Five new paintings will be on display for the first time. Althauser completed these paintings while ash from the Los Conchas fire rained down into his yard.
    The fire was a reminder of his love for the beauty of trees, especially Aspens.
    “Aspens are the rebirth trees. They make shade for the conifers and the pine to grow,” Althauser said. “Aspens are the forest renewal tree and the first tree to come in after a fire. To me it’s the birth of a forest when baby Aspens come up.”

  • For an amateur archaeologist and curious explorer,  there is nothing comparable to visiting the forgotten towns and villages of yesteryear. Handling the artifacts and witnessing the ruined walls first-hand can often yield important information not found in the pages of books or scholarly papers.    
    However, sifting through texts is sometimes necessary to glean important details and place artifacts in the context of time and space. In fact, I’ve realized that while physical artifacts are exciting, comparable knowledge can be found among the pages of a book.  

    The Quest for Knowledge

  • There is so much to do that this week, we’ll have to give you two assets, so we can squeeze them all in during the month. Our focus this week is asset 22, school engagement and asset 23, homework.
     Research indicates that there is a need for youth to be actively engaged in learning, and that a minimum of an hour of homework each night might be the key.
     This week, there are two opportunities to engage kids in learning, while you get to be involved, too.
     The first is Thursday  from 6-7:30 p.m. at Chamisa Elementary. The school science night provides some hands-on opportunities to learn, mixed with a little fun.

  • The summer rains were late, but they came. As always, they encouraged the annuals to pop up and the perennials to reach new heights.  
    Chick Keller will lead a free evening flower walk for Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 5:30 p.m. today. As curator of the Jemez Mountain Herbarium, Keller will provide a list of plants so that participants can keep track of what they see.  
    After meeting at PEEC, 3540 Orange Street, the group will caravan to the best site for September blooms. Asters, sunflowers, groundsels, skyrocket gilia, gayfeather — they’re all waiting to be admired

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.
    Signs of heat stroke in a pet are: rapid panting, wide eyes, lots of drooling, hot skin, twitching muscles, vomiting and a dazed look. Call your vet if you think your pet has heat stroke.

  • House of Hope and Shop
    on the Corner say thanks

     

  • Editor’s note: The Los Alamos Monitor will begin running restaurant inspection reports for Los Alamos, Española and Santa Fe in “Diversions” as they become available.

     Los Alamos

  • The Los Alamos Master Gardeners and the Los Alamos Photography Club feature, “Art, Gardening and Photography,” presented by Charles Mann, at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at Fuller Lodge.
    There are many who would  tell us how to photograph our gardens, but who can tell us why we want to photograph them? Mann, a professional garden photographer, has pondered the issues of art, beauty, nature and photography and has some insights, observations and conclusions to share, along with a panoply of photographs from across the gardening spectrum. Mann suggests that people learn to use their cameras as a tool to renew their enthusiasm for gardening as well as to  revive their appreciation for the hidden beauty all around them.

  • Those who have never experienced live theatre will have the opportunity to do so.
    Theatre is a unique experience, much different than a movie or sporting event — it is all about stories, emotion and local talent. Los Alamos Little Theatre presents the “8x103” one act play festival, opening Friday.
    The title, “8x103” represents eight 10-minute plays to make up a festival, and the three symbolizes LALT’s third such production, with others in 2006 and 2008. The included plays depict world views, relationships and  even a trip to France.

  • Nestled in the hills about 22 miles north of Española sits a village rich in history. It’s a “blink and you might miss it” kind of place, but the scenery surrounding the village is astounding, especially during autumn.
    With its red clay, stone formations  and stunning foliage along the Chama River, Abiquiú offers plenty of photo opportunities for visitors.
    These days, the area is known as Georgia O’Keeffe country because the New York artist made her home in Abiquiú, but it is steeped in history tied to the Abiquiú Genízaro Land Grant.

  • Thanks for helping

    About a week has passed since the Seed Ball Party on Aug. 20. The excitement has calmed down, and we have been able to peacefully resume our way of life in Los Alamos.
    I hope that in taking part in this event, you will remember the festivities and meaningful work that took place all across town. Everyone that came out had a great time, and the burned areas in Northern New Mexico will begin the process of healing.
    I am sure you may be wondering how many seed balls we made that afternoon.  Officially, I can say that we made as many as we could have made. All four sites exhausted all resources, consuming over 2,000 pounds of clay and compost, and numerous bags of seed.  

  • As we look at our first asset in the Commitment to Learning category, we find asset number 21, achievement motivation.
    It might be hard for everyone to be motivated with a three-day weekend behind us, but motivation is different for everyone.
    I think I have heard it all, but if you have an idea to share, we’d love to hear yours, even if it’s submitted anonymously.
    I have worked with teenagers for a number of years and I have heard about reward systems for report cards, a certain amount of dollars for an “A,” and a certain number for a “B.” It seems that a C doesn’t garner any attention.

  • Guitars at the Lodge featuring Ricko Donovan will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at Fuller Lodge. Tickets are $15, or $10 for LAAC members.

  • The Brown Bag Performance Series featuring Brass Ensembles with Jan McDonald and various other musicians will be at noon Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.

  • Every Sept. 11, the citizens of the United States stop what they’re doing and get together (at least spiritually) to commemorate those lost during the World Trade Center attacks.
    While different towns hold various ceremonies to honor their heroes, the Los Alamos United Way Youth Team proposes a completely different experience from the usual ceremonies and parades: Taste the Sky.
    This year’s event will be from 5-8 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Los Alamos County Airport. This should sound exciting to Los Alamos residents because aside from the location, there will also be family-oriented activities.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Pardon our construction. We are installing solar hot water, so the shelter has been closed to prevent accidents. If you need some help, call a volunteers at 412-3451.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.

  • The Los Alamos community has the opportunity to join in an international day of action titled, “Moving Planet,” on Sept. 24, organized by 350.org.
    This day will be a symbolic event to “move beyond fossil fuels” both figuratively — by pouring into the streets on bikes, skateboards, and on foot to “move” around the communities — and literally, by taking community action and calling for a shift in energy systems.

  • Boy Scout Troop 129 of White Rock celebrated a Court of Honor Aug. 9, for the promotion of John Scott Alison and Benjamin Eric Nelson to the rank of Eagle Scout.  Senior Patrol Leader Aaron Bao presided.
    Alison has been a Cub Scout since third grade, and earning the Arrow of Light, he joined Troop 129 in 2004. He has thus been active for over seven years. He moved through the ranks, earning 39 merit badges and said he most loved the outdoor activities, especially climbing the 14ers. His altitude record in the troop is 14,421-foot Mt. Massive of Colorado. Prior to that climb, he conquered Kit Carson and Challenger Point on the same day.

  • There’s nothing like moving to a new town and being told to get out, but that’s almost what happened to The United Church of Los Alamos’ new Pastor David Elton, soon after his arrival in Los Alamos.
    Elton, along with wife Lori and daughter Kathryn, arrived in Los Alamos on June 23, enjoyed an outdoor service and potluck with the congregation that Sunday and then were promptly told they had to evacuate on Monday.