• The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Café Sushi, 3801 Arkansas Ave.
    Date inspected: Nov. 29
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    El Parasol, 1903 Central Ave.
    Date inspected: Nov. 29
    Violations: One moderate-risk violation for contaminated equipment — cutting boards needs to be replaced. Grooves are too deep. Must be able to clean properly and contact surface needs to be smooth.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Los Alamos High School, 1300 Diamond Dr.
    Date inspected: Nov. 17, pre-opening

  • NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Fisk University’s decade-long quest to generate cash from a 101-piece art collection donated by the late painter Georgia O’Keeffe is one step closer to fruition.
    But it is unclear how quickly the historically black university in Nashville will be able to complete a $30 million deal to sell a 50 percent stake in the collection to the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Ark.
    Under the agreement, the artworks including O’Keefe’s own 1927 oil painting “Radiator Building — Night, New York” — would move between Fisk and the Arkansas museum every two years.

  • Sharon Snyder, author of “At Home on the Slopes of Mountains: The Story of Peggy Pond Church” and “Los Alamos and the Pajarito Plateau,” will sign her books from noon-2 p.m. Saturday at Otowi Station Bookstore.
    Church, author of the Southwest classic, “The House at Otowi Bridge,” has been called the first lady of New Mexican poetry.
    Using Church’s poems, journals, correspondence and interviews with friends and family, Snyder paints an emotional life portrait.
    The biography traces an historic life through canyons and ruins, trails and tall pines, a great flood and the loss of her home to the Manhattan Project of World War II.

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre will hold auditions for its February-March 2012 production, “The Giver” by Lois Lowery, directed by Mimi Adams and produced by Pat Beck.
    Auditions will run Dec. 2-4, with callbacks on Dec. 5. There are parts available for adults and children.
    Those interested in auditioning are asked to prepare a 60-90 second non-Shakespearian monologue.
    They will also read from audition sides taken from the script. Script and audition sides are available for overnight checkout at Mesa Public Library.
    Those auditioning should be prepared to indicate possible rehearsal and performance schedule conflicts.

  • Local artist Diana Bryer will give a talk titled, “Guardians of Hidden Traditions,” from 4-6 p.m. Dec. 11 at the Los Alamos Jewish Center, 2400 Canyon Road. Refreshments will be served.
    Bryer’s work has the universal power of myth and magic. She paints the people and history of Northern New Mexico from her studio in Chimayó. She will talk about her experience as a Jewish woman artist and how she was moved to paint Crypto-Jewish subjects. Bryer will also be available to autograph posters.

  • “It just doesn’t feel like December,” Karen Wray said as she was preparing her gallery for the annual Art For the Holidays show, which opens with a reception from 5-7 p.m. today.
    Normally, Wray feels very in tune with the coming of winter; landscape painters are deeply sensitive to seasonal changes. Her focus and immersion in leaves turning, the blooming of springtime, the heat of summer and the crisp starkness of winter is evident in the artwork she creates and curates in her gallery. The new pieces leaning against the wall capture the magic of a Los Alamos Winter.  

  • From the musical ballet, the “Nutcracker,” to the sounds of carolers singing holiday classics, Los Alamos will celebrate an “enchanted” holiday with a number of holiday-related events, starting with the three-day Winterfest weekend, Friday through Sunday.
    The cast of the Dance Arts Los Alamos group will help kick off the holiday festivities with a presentation of Tchaikovsky’s holiday classic, the “Nutcracker,” at 7 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Dec. 3 and 4 at the Duane Smith Auditorium.
    Saturday hosts a variety of activities. From 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fuller Lodge will have an open house with various musical performances.

  • The Major General Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of the Military Order of World Wars in Los Alamos announces New Mexico Secretary of Department of Veteran Services Col. Tim Hale USAF retired, will present the Pearl Harbor Recognition Day address at the Chapter’s Dec. 7 dinner meeting.
    The meeting will be at the Best Western Hilltop House, Tyonuyi Room. The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    Hale’s talk begins at about
    7:15 p.m. The dinner entrée is roulette of beef, scallop potatoes, vegetables, salad and desert. Cost of the dinner is $27 per person.

  • On Dec. 2, the Los Alamos community will once again be treated to a concert of Christmas music. 

    The full Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra will present a program that is “lively, fun and toe-tapping” according to director Don Gerheart. 

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Be sure to click on the Friends of the Shelter website, www.lafos.org. You can volunteer and/or donate, as well as check out links to all our adoptable pals.
    We have a new color-coding system to help you select your perfect new family member. Check it out.
    Two for the price of one. This is an opportunity to double your feline pleasure.


    Baby — Young spayed female GSD-mix. Very friendly. Loves the dog park.

    Buddy —Another youg neutered male GSD-mix. Just waiting on shots. Very sweet and friendly.

  • The Los Alamos High School NJROTC air rifle team members display the first place trophy, which the precision team won at the Duke City Cup match Nov. 19.
    Members of the winning team were Jodi Cull-Host, Cory Aslin, Tessa Snyder and Noah Marriott. The team said they were happy for the win over rivals Manzano, West Mesa and Eldorado. Individually, Cull-Host finished second, Aslin finished fifth and Snyder 10th.
    The trio qualified and fired in the daily top eight finals match. The Duke City Cup Match was a match where the top 10 percent of the finishers qualify for points to become a distinguished three-position air rifle shooter.
    More than 200 shooters from New Mexico and Texas JROTC and 4H programs participated in the event.

  • The 18th annual Crèches from Around the World, an exhibit featuring hundreds of nativity sets, will be from 1-7:30 p.m. Dec. 2 and from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 3 at 1967 18th St., just off Sage and 15th Street.
    The event is part of Los Alamos Winterfest week and is sponsored by The Los Alamos Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Admission is free and refreshments will be served. Everyone is invited to attend.
    The show features crèches from approximately 50 countries. They are made from several materials, including bone, ceramic, fabric, stone, wood and rare materials.

  • Help made Arts Fair
    a success

    The hard work of many dedicated volunteers resulted in a successful Northern New Mexico Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair.
    In addition to the Los Alamos Arts Council, the fair benefited from the efforts of RSVP members who posted flyers around Los Alamos before the fair and the Fabulous 50s Diner that provided the food and beverages for the event.
    As always, a big thank you goes to our board members and volunteers who spent many hours in preparation, as well as time staffing the fair. LAAC is fortunate to have a wonderful group of volunteers who assist us with this and other events. Among them are Lisa Lloyd, Lori Dauelsberg, Terry Goodwin, Maxine Joppa, Taedg Woods, Bill Hamilton, Sarah Downs and Andrew Weinman.

  • Having a sick child can take a toll on any family, but having a child that needs to be hospitalized is even more difficult. Especially if the hospital is in another town. The Ronald McDonald House in Albuquerque helps soften the blow for families by providing them with lodging while their children are hospitalized or going to doctors appointments.
    A group of Los Alamos and White Rock children are doing their part to help the families and the Ronald McDonald House by collecting aluminum can tabs. The youngsters from the Los Alamos Family Council’s Youth Activity Centers collect the tabs from soda cans at each center.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Angel’s Bakery, 394 Los Pinos Road
    Date inspected: Nov. 16
    Violations: One low-risk violation for floors/walls/ceilings — the wall by the three-compartment sink is not sealed.
    Status of establishment: Approved

    Aztec Café, 317 Aztec St.
    Date inspected: Nov. 15

  • The public is invited to visit the Historical Museum from 5-7 p.m. Dec. 13 for the opening reception of “Las Conchas Fire Community Photographs,” an exhibit featuring 44 photographic images submitted by local residents of Los Alamos and neighboring Northern New Mexico communities.
    The exhibit will be on view in the museum throughout the month of December.
    The photographs on display in this exhibition offer an inspired public response to the impact and destruction of Las Conchas on Northern New Mexico in the early weeks of the summer of 2011.
    During the fire, many residents of Los Alamos and neighboring communities took photographs of smoke plumes, burning mountains and the men, women and aircraft sent in to battle the blaze.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre presents “Frosty Windows, Starry Skies: Tales for the Midwinter,” a storytelling event for people of all ages. Adults, as well as children who are excellent readers, are welcome to audition. This is the opportunity to get on stage and tell a story. Performances will be Jan. 27, 28 and 29.
    This event is for those who are good storytellers, or who like reading stories. Auditions for prospective storytellers will be from 6-8 p.m. Nov. 28 and Nov. 29. Auditions will be at Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar Street.

  • First performed in 1892, “The Nutcracker” did not gain popularity outside of Russia until the 1940s. Tchaikovsky’s score, combined with Petipa’s original choreography, is now the most popular ballet performed in the world.
    Countless interpretations of the holiday classic exist. There are art-deco Nutcrackers, circus-themed Nutcrackers, all-male Nutcrackers and hip-hop Nutcrackers, to name a few of the themes and twists. 

  • Thanksgiving is a celebration of life’s blessings. A time to share an enormous feast with loved ones in honor of the year’s successful harvest.  

    The Thanksgiving holiday has long been associated with the historical tale of a ship, the Mayflower, which carried a group of pilgrims to Plymouth Rock, Mass. in 1621. Few would associate the holiday with Spanish conquistadors, armored soldiers and Catholic friars.

  • The doors of Fuller Lodge will be open on the first Saturday in December to ring in the holidays. Carolers, cookies and the community Christmas tree fill the Lodge with the colors, sounds, scents and joy of the season.
    The open house, a collaboration between the Los Alamos Arts Council and other community organizations, features children’s programs, local authors, refreshments, a posole lunch and music.
    During the day,  the Boy Scouts will sell holiday wreaths and the Los Alamos High school band will sell  poinsettias. For stocking stuffers and Christmas gifts, Empty Bowl, Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the animal shelter will sell calendars and the Historical Society Museum Shop will offer books and other items.