.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Marion Holland of Los Alamos is presented with a $100 gift card from Smith’s by Los Alamos Monitor circulation director Mike Lippiatt, publisher Keven Todd and editor John Severance.

  • When was the last time you did something kind for someone else?
    This week we look at asset number 26, the asset of caring. This asset is achieved when young people place a high value on helping others.  
    Back in the day, I worked at a radio station in Idaho. One holiday season some young people called the station and asked if I would call a certain phone number and tell them to look on the porch. Presumably, there was a surprise waiting for the person on the other end of the phone line.

  • The Valentine Senior Prom on Feb. 11 was a night to remember for residents of Sombrillo Nursing and Rehabilitation Center and their guests.
    Residents were dressed in prom finery, the room was decorated with red streamers, flowers and red and white balloons, and the music kept all toes tapping.
    Each resident was given a boutonniere or corsage.

  • In this event hosted by the Mesa Public Library’s Poetry Gatherings Series, poet Stephanie N. Johnson will give a reading from her book “Kinesthesia,” winner of the 2008 Many Voices Project Award.
    Her poems and essays have appeared in AGNI, BPJ, Dislocate, Massachusetts Review, Water Stone Review and elsewhere. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a master’s degree in creative writing with a graduate minor in complementary and alternative therapies from the University of Minnesota.

  • Celebrate the 63rd annual Skiesta at Pajarito Mountain on Saturday.  Although Mother Nature was not kind this year, there is still a lot to celebrate, so join the fun, test your skills and win a prize in the Snowshoe Race, Sloppy Slalom Obstacle Course or participate in Tug o’ War.  
    A costume contest will be held, so attendees are encouraged to dress for that. Enjoy  live music from Felix y los Gatos from 1-5pm. The Mountain Café will be open from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and beer from seven different micro-breweries will be available from noon-5 p.m.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation presents, Great Conversations!
    It won’t take long for the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation’s annual Great Conversations dinner to become a favorite in town. Join a group of tablemates and a speaker at 5:30 p.m. April 10 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center for an informative conversation.
    This is the second of a series of articles on the featured speakers.  To see a complete list of speakers, topics and to print a registration form, visit www.lapsfoundation.com.

  • Otowi Station Bookstore and the Hill Diner invite individuals and teams to participate in events on Pi Day, March 14 (3.14), and enjoy samples of a Hill Diner pie. 

  •  

       

    March 6-12, 2011

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes. 

  • Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and the House of Hope (HoH) Women will commemorate Shrove on Tuesday, by hosting a pancake supper fundraiser from 5:30-7 p.m. in Kelly Hall, 3900 Trinity Drive. 

  • Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation presents, Great Conversations!

  • The Santa Fe National Forest will offer public information meetings on volunteer opportunities near Las Vegas, Santa Fe and Los Alamos this spring and early  summer. 

  • While the coming Little Forest Playschool Annual Spring Resale will still offer the same variety and deals, participants should be on the look out for some new changes this year, said school director, Jeni Morrison. 

  • WASHINGTON — Turns out it really does take a rocket scientist to beat Watson, the “Jeopardy”-winning computer.
    U.S. Rep. Rush Holt of New Jersey — a five-time champion during the trivia show’s original run 35 years ago — topped the IBM computer Monday night in a “Jeopardy”-style match of congressmen vs. machine held at a Washington hotel.

  • Opera Alta and the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos present a condensed concert version of Gilbert and Sullivan’s “H.M.S. Pinafore,” or “The Lass that Loved a Sailor,” at 7 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage St.  
    Enjoy a tongue-in-cheek look at authority based solely on class distinctions and romance that refuses such confinement, all in the world’s perkiest and wordiest music ever written.     

  • Otowi Station, an official sponsor the 2011 Empty Bowls event, began selling tickets and bowls on Feb. 27. Patrons can choose a bowl from an assortment of locally sculpted and painted ceramic bowls to add to their home collections, or choose from one of hundreds of bowls at the event.
    Self Help, Inc., will host this year’s Empty Bowls event from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. March 12 at the Betty Erhart Senior Center. In addition to a luncheon featuring homemade soup, bread and dessert, the event will also include a silent auction and live music.

  • Sometimes deciding what to eat for dinner can be harder than trying to solve a calculus problem, especially when you’re in the mood for something different.
    Luckily, Jo-Ji’s Sushi and Teppan Grill located at 1508B N. Riverside Drive in Española can help anyone out of their culinary doldrums.
    Located in a strip mall, between a cell phone store and a defunct pizza buffet joint, the restaurant isn’t much to look at from the outside, but once inside, the atmosphere changes.

  • Teatro Paraguas will present “Jim Sagel, poeta nuevomexicano,” a tribute to the poet, writer, instructor and long-time Española resident at 7 p.m. Friday in the the Univeristy of New Mexico-Los Alamos Lecture Hall (Bldg. 2). The event is free and open to everyone.
    Sagel was an instructor at UNM-LA for a number of years. He was director of the Division of Humanities at UNM- LA, a post he held until his untimely death (by suicide) in 1998.

  • Moonlight and magnolias is a phrase used to describe the beauty, serenity and romanticism of the South before the Civil War, as experienced by the landed gentry. The popular film “Gone with the Wind” exemplifies this feeling. The South’s wealthy landowners lost everything they held near and dear in the Civil War, and so moonlight and magnolias was forevermore tarnished. Today, films like “Gone with the Wind” have the ability to temporarily, but perfectly, restore this long-lost feeling to a fortunate audience.