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Features

  • 1. “All Thing Shining ...” Hubert Dreyfus

    2. “Encyclopedia of Santa Fe ...” Mark Cross*

    3. “109 East Palace,” Jennet Conant

    4. “Wonder,” R.J. Palacio

    5. “Survival Under Atomic Attack,” U.S. Government

    6. “Seraphina,” Rachel Hartman

  • 1. We Are Never Getting Back ..., Taylor Swift

    2. Whistle, Flo Rida

    3. Lights, Ellie Goulding

    4. One More Night, Maroon 5

    5. Some Nights, fun.

    6. Call Me Maybe, Carly Rae Jepsen

  • Chick Keller will lead a “Frijoles Canyon Devastation and Recovery Interpretive Hike” Sept. 16.  The hike is free and open to the public, with no registration required. Participants should meet at 8 a.m. at Ponderosa Campground, near the intersection of N.M. 501 and N.M. 4.  

    The hike will first go about one-and-a-half miles to the rim of Frijoles Canyon, through moderate burn damage and one badly flood-damaged site. Participants who wish to continue will hike down into the canyon to Upper Crossing and then bushwhack up-canyon about a mile farther. 

    Keller chose this hiking route to show both the devastation of the fire and subsequent flooding in upper Frijoles Canyon, habitat loss that has occurred and the amount of recovery that has taken place. Total hiking time will be about five hours, with around 500-feet of elevation gain on the way out.  

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department. 

     

    Santa Fe

     

    Carlos Gilbert Elementary, 300 Griffin

    Date inspected: Aug. 29

  • Sometimes a burger and fries just sounds good. But as just about every Los Alamos resident knows, the choices here are kind of limited, so frequenting the same restaurants can be a bit tiresome after a while. 

    Having heard mixed reviews about the Fabulous 50s Diner, this diner was reluctant to try it. Some seemed to like it, others did not. It’s kind of hard to bring yourself to go to a new place, knowing you might like it. Or you might hate it. Either way, it was given a shot on a rainy Sunday afternoon.

    Located behind the Hill Diner in the American Legion building, the place is pretty easy to find. Just look for the white Kaleidoscoops school bus parked outside. As you walk in, the walls are covered with flyers announcing specials. It’s a seat-yourself kind of place, so there’s no need to wait for a hostess. 

  • In a series of performances from Sept. 11-14, storyteller Susan Marie Frontczak will portray perhaps the most famous of women scientists, Madame Marie Curie (née Maria Skłodowska). 

    Curie changed the world through her discovery of radium and radioactivity. Through collaboration with the medical community, she and her husband Pierre discovered and established the first successful radiation treatments of cancer.  Simply through her own passion and perseverance, Curie opened the doors of science to women worldwide.

    The morning of Sept. 11, Frontczak will visit Pojoaque High School science classes, telling Curie’s story and encouraging students in science and math. The same evening at 7:30 p.m., she will present a “Conversation with Marie Curie” at Fuller Lodge, sponsored by the Los Alamos Historical Society. 

  • Los Alamos has the distinction of being designated as a New Mexico Arts and Cultural District not only for traditionally creative arts — visual art, music, dance and theater — but for scientific creativity as well. As a celebration of that blend of scientific and artistic creativity, the local Next Big Idea festival features all kinds of cutting-edge endeavors. 

    This month, ISEA2012,  the 18th International Symposium on Electronic Art, a multi-event and exhibit symposium is being hosted by Albuquerque, with programming statewide, including in Los Alamos. 

  • Today

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents “The Descendants,” (R), at 6:30 p.m.

     

    Bird Banding Talk at PEEC by local birder Dave Yeamans. Learn how scientists use banding methods to track and study birds around the world. See photos, hear stories and watch movies of ornithologists at work. 7 p.m. Free. No registration required. Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information.

     

    Friday

  • “The Descendants,” screening Thursday at Mesa Public Library, is the kind of film that smart people wish would win awards. 

    It’s not sensationalistic or gratuitous. It’s not one easy laugh after another, one car chase after another, one famous person after another saying dumb, obvious things with their multi-million-dollar voices. 

    And in fact, the film did win an Oscar for Best Writing, Adapted Screenplay and was nominated for four others: Best Achievement in Directing (Alexander Payne); Best Achievement in Film Editing (Kevin Tent); Best Motion Picture; and Best Actor (George Clooney). 

  • The  Los Alamos High School Homecoming Parade is slated for Sept. 21. 

    Staging begins at 2 p.m. on 4th Street and Central Avenue, at the Canyon School parking lot. The parade send-off will begin at 3 p.m. Walkers should stage on the west side of the Canyon School parking lot, while floats/trailers should only stage on the east side of the parking lot. This arrangement is different from last year.

    The parade will step off at the intersection of 4th Street and Central Avenue at 3 p.m. Parade participants should arrive no later than 2:30 p.m. The parade will head down Central Avenue, past the judges’ stand in front of Starbucks, finishing on Rose Street. 

    Walking participants will be directed to the United Church parking lot, while driving participants must drive to the Griffith or Mesa parking lot before unloading their participants. 

  • Today
    Mesa Public Library presents Game Night from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Bring your games or play theirs. For all ages.
     
    Monica Witt, Utilities and Institutional Facilities Energy manager at LANL will give a talk at 7 p.m. in upstairs meeting rooms 2 and 3 at Mesa Public Library. Witt has worked at LANL for 10 years in the environmental and energy management fields. She is responsible for implementing projects to reduce energy and water to meet the lab’s sustainability goals. She will discuss the federal sustainability requirements and what LANL is working on to meet energy, water and greenhouse gas reduction goals. The program is co-sponsored by the Sierra Club and the Los Alamos Sustainability Network.

    Thursday
    The Los Alamos Farmers Market will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the parking lot of Mesa Public Library.

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents “The Descendants,” (R), at 6:30 p.m.

    Bird Banding Talk at PEEC by local birder Dave Yeamans. Learn how scientists use banding methods to track and study birds around the world. See photos, hear stories and watch movies of ornithologists at work. 7 p.m. Free. No registration required. Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information.

    Friday

  • Douglas and Ruth Helmick Lier

    Doug and Ruth Lier are both of Scandinavian descent and perhaps that partially explains how they fit together so well. Doug notes his heritage is Norwegian and Danish, and Ruth descends from “Viking kings.” Maybe that bond also fires the apparently boundless energy and interests they share and pour into the community — much to the betterment of Los Alamos for the past 60 years.
    Green Bay, Wis. was home to Doug until he left to attend St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minn., where he earned his bachelor’s degree in physics.  Following graduation, he joined the Navy’s Officer Candidate School. Due to his background in physics and math, Doug was sent to Sandia Base in Albuquerque for training as a nuclear supervisor. He served out the remainder of the Korean War in the far East as a nuclear supervisor aboard Navy carriers.
    He later joined the Los Alamos Laboratory as a joint task force member, then as a lab staff member in J and P divisions, and ended his 36-year lab career in the directors’ office.
    Ruth Helmick Lier grew up in Des Moines, Iowa and at 22, was happily completing her master’s degree in microbiology when she learned the Los Alamos school system was seeking a science teacher.

  • Register middle school or high school students for STEM Student Day from 4-7 p.m. Sept. 14.
    Everyone starts off at the Little Theater at 4 p.m. with a character performance of Madame Curie. Then at 5 p.m., walk over to the Bradbury Science Museum and have pizza and attend a program of the students’ choice (required at time of registration). Students choose from: Kraz-E-Science show; Mars-Rover program; or Fire Science program. All programs are limited in size. There will also be an iPad giveaway followed by seeing a domonstration of the Procter & Gamble Corvette with jet engine in the parking lot across the street.
    Register at chamberorganizer.com/members/evr/reg_event.
    The last Los Alamos County Summer Concer Series event of the season will be at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond, featuring Stephanie Hatfield.
    From 11 a.m.-3 p.m.  Sept. 15, The Next Big Idea Festival will be at Fuller Lodge. There will be entertainment planned and food. Kids of all ages, as well as other venues about town such as the Bradbury Science Museum, Recycled Fashion Show down MainStreet, Mesa Pubic Library and parking lot and Central Park Square’s Beer garden at The Park or green area. Go to nextbigideala.com for more information.

  • Benjamin Batha, a junior majoring in computer science at the University of Rochester, has been named to the dean’s list for academic achievement for the spring 2012 semester.
    Batha, a resident of Los Alamos, is the son of Margo and Steven Batha, and a graduate of Los Alamos High School.
    The University of Rochester, founded in 1850, is a private research university located in Rochester, N.Y., (pop. 212,000) on the south shore of Lake Ontario.
    The University offers an undergraduate curriculum, with no required courses, that emphasizes a broad liberal education through majors, minors, and course “clusters”—a Rochester innovation—in the three main areas of knowledge: humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences/engineering.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

    DOGS
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.
    Ellie — Adult spayed female black Shepherd-mix. Friendly, well-socialized, fine with other dogs.
    Five Border Collie puppies— Four-months-old, four males and one female. They are pretty shy and the volunteers are working on socialization. Keep watching as they develop into fun, approachable pups.
    Naney — Senior brown-and-white English Hound-mix. Owner going abroad. Needs a quiet retirement home. Has reasonable doggy manners. Would be a nice, calm companion in a quiet home.  Will have some tumors removed and a good dental next week.

  • Dick Tatro, Jeanne Butler, and Douglas and Ruth Helmick Lier will be recognized and honored as the newest members of Living Treasures of Los Alamos  on Sept. 9. The ceremony and reception, sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank, will commence at 2 p.m. in the Betty Ehart Senior Center.  The public is invited to attend.
    This event is an opportunity to celebrate the contributions of individuals who have enhanced life on the Hill.  Friends, family and co-workers are encouraged to participate in the ceremony by sharing stories and remembrances about each new Treasure.
    Living Treasures of Los Alamos pays tribute to seniors whose activities have made a notable difference in the quality of life for community residents. These individuals are role models and mentors, providing inspiration as they demonstrate commitment, perseverance, hope, heart and wisdom. Their contributions are diverse but they share a common outlook, which is to live life to the fullest.
    LTLA honors these people by sharing a glimpse into their lives and acknowledging their contributions. More information about the Living Treasures program may be found at livingtreasureslosalamos.org.
    Join friends, family and LTLA in recognizing Dick, Jeanne, Doug and Ruth as they are acknowledged as Living Treasures of Los Alamos.

    Jeanne Butler

  • ‘Bless Me, Ultima’ to be screened in NM after all

    SANTA FE — A movie based on Rudolfo Anaya’s iconic New Mexico-based novel “Bless Me, Ultima” will be screened in the state after all.
    The Albuquerque Journal reports (http://bit.ly/PYalrp) that the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival has scheduled a screening of the film Oct. 17 to kick off the film festival.
    The move comes after producers of the film announced it was to premiere in El Paso, Texas at the historic Plaza Theatre, although the novel is set in the small town of Guadalupe, N.M., during World War II, and the film was entirely shot in New Mexico.
    The novel follows 6-year-old Antonio Marez, and a curandera named Ultima.
    “Bless Me, Ultima” has been credited with sparking the Mexican-American literature movement. It has been banned in some Arizona schools.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Española

    Arby’s MJG Corp., 930 Riverside Dr.
    Date inspected: Aug. 22
    Violations: Three moderate-risk violations for other — floor in walk-in cooler rusty, needs cleaning and/or replacement to keep clean. Repeat violation. Back door has cracks/visible light to outdoors, potential to allow mice/insects/vermin inside. Repeat violation. Employees/all food prep./service staff must wear hair restraints. Cap, hat, hair net, etc. Repeat violation. One low-risk violation for administration — repeat violations may lead to permit suspension and/or facility downgrade. Note: as violations continue, they expand/move up to next risk level until corrected or permit suspended. Facility doing better, but facility in bad shape, needs repairs, maintenance. Notable repeat violations could lead to permit suspension. History of repeat violations at this site.
    Notes: Hand wash sink operable, hot/cold water OK. Temperatures overall OK, roast beef hot holding at 145 degrees; cheese cold holding, 40-41 degrees. Three-compartment sink full of utensils. Meat slicer in back needs thorough cleaning, wash, rinse, sanitize in place cleaning. Needs to be cleaned prior to next use.