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Features

  • The Los Alamos Geological Society will host a banquet and talk at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Christian Church, featuring Dr. Paul Bauer, of the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources.
    This talk is a geo-photo-journey down the northern Rio Grande, with an emphasis on the river hydrogeology and the evolution of the sublime landscape.
    It will include some thoughts on the birth and adolescence of the river, where it gets its water and its system of springs.
    They will also explore the geologic setting of rapids along the river, the Tertiary battles between water and lava and tidbits of riverside human history.
    Bauer is a principal geologist and associate director at the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources at New Mexico Tech.
    He received a doctorate in geology from New Mexico Tech in 1988. He served as manager of the state’s Geologic Mapping Program for 12 years and was program coordinator for the New Mexico Decision-Makers Field Conferences for 10 years, a program designed to bridge the gap between earth scientists and policy makers.
    Since his first Taos Box rafting trip in 1980, he has spent much of the last 30 years investigating the geology and hydrogeology of north-central New Mexico. He has led many field trips to the area, including educational whitewater rafting tours.

  • Local embroiderers have an opportunity to learn Romanian Point Lace and Surface Embroidery from guest teacher Sylvia Murariu, at a workshop, April 27 and 28.
    The class, “Gentle Zephyr,” is sponsored by the Pajarito Chapter of the Embroiderers Guild of America and is open to non-members.
    It will be from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. in the classroom of the Fuller Lodge Art Center. Registration with a deposit for $70 must be received by Feb. 15.
    The cost of the two-day session will be less than $90.
    The exact amount depends on expenses and number of participants. In addition, the price of the kit, which contains complete materials to stitch this flower cluster, is $85.
    This new form of expression incorporates Jacobean style crewel embroidery, Romanian Point Lace, golden coils and beads.
    The Romanian Point Lace that is a large part of this design and includes crocheted cord and needle-lace stitches.
    Murariu, a native of Romania now living in Oregon, learned this traditional form of lace making as a child.
    Over the years, her collection of stitches has grown to more than 400. She has authored books and taught the art for a number of years at venues across the country.

  • The Los Alamos Choral Society and the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra will present “Messiah” by George Frederick Handel, from 3-6 p.m. Sunday at the Duane Smith Auditorium, 1300 Diamond Dr. Dr. Mary Badarak will direct the performance. The chorus of about 80 singers and the orchestra ensemble of about 40 musicians, are featured in this performance.

  • Cadet Ensign Jodi Thomas, the public affairs officer for the Los Alamos NJROTC Unit, has one public affair that she would like everyone to attend.
    Their monthly brisket night will take place on Jan. 31 and local cadets could use some support.
    “The academic team will be going to Las Vegas, Nev. for the annual Brain Brawl, where they will compete against Area 13,” Thomas said. “The money raised will help pay for the transportation, hotel rooms and meals.”
    Thomas became interested in the Los Alamos NJROTC Unit when she was in middle school, after target shooting at the Sportsman Club. She now competes on the unarmed regulation drill team, the unarmed exhibition drill team, the academic team and the tug-of-war team.
    “Once I got involved with the unit and the people, I realized they had much more to offer other than just shooting.”
    Thomas said she had a wonderful time after joining the drill team and gained personal experiences with the unit.
     “I have learned endless amounts of leadership skills by participating in various activities in our class, in a leadership camp over the summer and have been put in many leadership positions that helps me and many others learn leadership hands-on,” Thomas said.

  • Colleen Goddard (third from left), poses with Chamisa students Tuesday morning, as they fundraised for field trips. Students hand made key chains and bracelets to sell. 

  • I hope you spent some time yesterday taking in the 2013 Inauguration.
    The politics of the day don’t matter when you have a chance to witness history in the making — especially if you can share it with youth.
    I viewed the event from a different perspective, taking in all the SPARKS or passions that were represented on a grand stage.
    As a speech communications major, I like to watch for the speeches, the pomp and circumstance and I love a good military march from the Marine Corps Band, also known as The President’s Own.
    We had the representation of music from instrumental to James Taylor, Kelly Clarkson and Beyoncé. How wonderful for every age to be able to relate.
    There was also the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir and the solo of Alicia Olatula, during the “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Think of the possibility that elementary-aged kids can see what can become of their passions. I understand that it is even available on iTunes.
    There was fashion and hairstyle discussion throughout the day and I’m sure that will continue for the days ahead.
    Poetry from Richard Blanco was part of the program and Blanco even used it to pay tribute to his mother’s work, to provide him the moment. How neat to see so much art and culture throughout the morning.

  • Learn about how archaeologists study ancient sites in the wake of forest fires, from 7-8 p.m. Tuesday at Pajarito Environmental Education Center. Dr. Anastasia Steffen will give a hands-on introduction to archaeological obsidian analyses and an overview of current projects underway at the Valles Caldera National Preserve.
    The large forest fires of the last few decades have burned much of the eastern Jemez Mountains, including about one-third of the Valles Caldera. Culminating with the recent Las Conchas Fire, this spate of wildfires burned hundreds of archaeological sites, including more than 80 percent of the prehistoric obsidian quarries.
    In this talk, Steffen will consider the methods archaeologists can use to understand how past peoples made tools, when they were making them, how past forest fires may have affected the archaeological sites, how the soil deposits at these sites have changed over the centuries, and ways that the volcanic glass was transported and traded across the continent.
    Steffen is cultural resources coordinator at the Valles Caldera National Preserve and adjunct faculty in the Anthropology Department at the University of New Mexico. She has worked in the Jemez Mountains since 1990 and has led archaeological inventory and research at the preserve since 2001.

  • When Lauri Houlton received the call from the Española Valley Humane Society’s Linda Sanchez, she had no idea what she was in store for. After all, she began fostering dogs in April 2011, so it was no surprise that she was being called on to foster another pup.

    Dracula, a black-and-tan puppy came to stay with Houlton and her boyfriend Ross Van Lyssel on Oct. 4, because he was too small to go to the mobile adoption scheduled for that weekend.

    Van Lyssel has a Shepherd/Husky-mix named Beth and Houlton has two dogs she kept from her first fostering, brother and sister, Knut and Klondike.

    Plus, fostering dogs is nothing new for the couple. They have fostered 129 dogs.

    Dracula, however, was not their typical foster pup.

    “The very first day Drac came home, we noticed he got sick every time he ate his Puppy Chow. He couldn’t keep anything down,” Houlton said.

    “He was returned to the shelter on Friday the 5th so the vets could check him out. I called all weekend to check on him. Linda then had me meet with Dr. Parker, a vet at EVHS. He explained that he believed Dracula had an aortic arch. That is a blood vessel that has grown around and encircling the esophagus instead of next to it.”

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. Others are currently off-campus in loving foster homes.
    Be sure to visit the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out the Petfinder page for pictures and to learn more about all of the adoptable pets, petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    This would be a wonderful time to consider giving a home to one of the animals in the shelter.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped.

  •  

    Kathleen Veenstra is probably most well known for her many years of work with the Los Alamos Public Schools as a counselor, but fewer people are probably familiar with her as an artist. 

    Veenstra is a ceramicist/potter and also a fine artist, painting landscapes and portraits. When asked about how she was able to develop to a professional level in all three areas, Veenstra explained that her first love was art and the career as a counselor evolved somewhat circuitously from there.

    Veenstra remembers painting as a child, encouraged by her father, a frustrated painter. She was proficient as a portrait painter by the time she entered college and had her first formal training. There, she discovered that the combination of feeling and light, which shape landscape paintings fulfilled her artistic desires. She went on to receive a master’s degree in studio art. 

  • Join Poet Laureate of Santa Fe, Jon Davis, to kick off the beginning of the new line-up of Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series with a poetry reading at 7 p.m. Jan. 24 in the upstairs rotunda.
    “Jon Davis is the author of three chapbooks and three full-length collections of poetry, ‘Preliminary Report’ (Copper Canyon Press, 2010), ‘Scrimmage of Appetite’ (University of Akron Press, 1995), for which he was honored with a Lannan Literary Award in Poetry and ‘Dangerous Amusements’ (Ontario Review Press, 1987), for which he received a G.E. Younger Writers Award and the Peter I.B. Lavan Younger Poets Prize from the Academy of American Poets,” according to santafenm.gov.
    “He has also received two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Lannan Residency and a fellowship to The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.”

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Española

    Burger King, Riverside Dr.
    Date inspected: Jan. 4
    Violations: Two moderate-risk violations, one for poor personal hygiene — hand sink was removed from food prep area. Need to re-install in original food preparation area to make it convenient for employees to wash hands. Notify NMED when completed, within 30 days. One for animals/vermin/openings — back door has gap at bottom and side. Potential to allow insects and vermin access to facility. Need to seal.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    El Espresso, 1451 Calle Hermanas Dominicas
    Date inspected: Jan. 3, closing
    Status of establishment: Closed

  • The American Cancer Society has selected Cindy Eaton to serve as event chair for the 2013 Relay For Life of Los Alamos.
    Eaton was selected because of her past experience on the Relay committee.
    She was the event chair a couple of years ago and has knowledge of the event.
    “Cindy brings leadership and organizational skills with a passion to fight against cancer,” Gloria Martinez, event manager for the Relay for Life of Los Alamos said.
    “The American Cancer Society is truly blessed to have Cindy come back on board as event chair.”
    Relay For Life mobilizes communities throughout the country to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost and provide participants with an opportunity to fight back against the disease.
    Relay For Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at an athletic track, park or other gathering area, with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening.
    Teams do most of their fundraising prior to the event, but some teams also hold fundraisers at their campsites during Relay.

  • Ahh, it is that time of year again, time for my annual germ column.
    No, I didn’t go back to find what I wrote last year, but usually around this time, I attempt to write something about germs.
    For those of you that haven’t gotten your flu shot yet, please do so, as we still have a long way to go. I hear many people say, “well I never get a flu shot and I have never gotten the flu.” My answer to that is, your fortune is due to the 97 percent of people around you that probably do get it — and that is why you are healthy.
    If I had the time to investigate it, I would research the number of shots given out in our community through various resources. Blue Cross Blue Shield providing flu shots at our local Smith’s grocery was such a great resource to the community.
    While I’m pretty sure that we still don’t have a local public health nurse, probably going on the third or fourth month, I’m sure arrangements can be made with them.
    I used to babysit for a doctor and she said she picked me because she knew I would spray the handle of the grocery store cart with Lysol before putting my baby in it. You only have to see a baby suck on that one time to actually feel your skin crawl. My advice — unless you really have to take them to the store — don’t do it!

  • Perhaps one of the most cohesive and flawlessly run programs in the community is on the horizon and if you have the time, talent or financial means, the Los Alamos County Science Fair has a place for you.
    The county science fair, slated for Jan. 26, is clearly down to a science and there’s no better place to put on a show than Los Alamos.
    Dawn Brown has taken the event to new heights, enlisting volunteers — and if you always wanted to be involved, this is the time of year to jump in with both feet.
    “The judges will judge our students for regional awards, as well as locally donated awards and prizes,” Brown said.
    Individuals with particular backgrounds including math, physics, computer sciences, earth and environmental sciences, engineering, animal sciences or in the areas of medicine and health, can be helpful, as judges are still needed.
    Los Alamos Public Schools will utilize a total of 100 judges from the community.
    Currently, the program is still in need of about 20 judges for the event at Los Alamos High School.
    “LAHS is the gem of our public school system,” Brown said. “It was very exciting for us to host our science fair at such a wonderful venue.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. Others are currently off-campus in loving foster homes.
    Be sure to visit the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out the Petfinder page for pictures and to learn more about all of the adoptable pets, petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    This would be a wonderful time to consider giving a home to one of the animals in the shelter.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped.

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    Art exhibits

     

    Taos artist Maye Torres will exhibit “Maye Torres: Unbound,” at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos. Her one-person exhibit opens Saturday and remains on view through Jan. 27. For more information, visit harwoodmuseum.org or call 575-758-9826.

     

    Art openings

     

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    Learn about restoration work in the Jemez Mountains from 7-8 p.m. Jan. 17 at Pajarito Environmental Education Center. 

    Anne Bradley, Forest Conservation program manager for The Nature Conservancy, will give a talk about the Conservancy’s current projects in the area, which include the Conservation Canines.

    The Nature Conservancy has recently partnered with several organizations to provide information about climate change and tools to aid in forest conservation and restoration. 

    One of the collaborations is the study of the Jemez Mountains Salamander, which includes a partnership with the “Conservation Canines” from the University of Washington.  

  •  

    The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department. 

     

    Santa Fe

     

    Allsup’s #336, 650 Cerrillos Road

    Date inspected: Jan. 3

    Violations: Two moderate-risk violations for contaminated equipment — inadequate dishwashing facility, no stoppers, no dish rack for clean dishes. Non-NSF hot dog warmer.

  •  

    New Mexico native Jeremy Denk will be the featured artist as the Los Alamos Concert Association continues its 2012-2013 season with a performance at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Duane Smith Auditorium.  

    Denk has appeared as soloist with many major orchestras, including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Philadelphia Orchestra and the symphony orchestras of Boston, Chicago, San Francisco and London. 

    He regularly gives recitals in New York, Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and around the United States. Denk is known for his music writing, which has appeared in the New Yorker, the front page of the New York Times Book Review, Newsweek and on the NPR Music website.