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Features

  • The Tools for Schools project got underway Aug. 6 and 7 when members from the Unitarian and Bethlehem Lutheran churches unloaded a truckload of school supplies.

    Each year the Tools for Schools project donates thousands of dollars in school supplies to at-risk students in poverty, to ensure that all students start the year with the tools they need to accomplish their academic work.

    The project’s vision is to help students identify positively with school by minimizing the embarrassment of not having

    adequate supplies.

  • The Coffeehouse at Fuller Lodge served up slices of cake and helpings of Chamber music for years before shutting down. Now, the music coffeehouse is back open for business and will open its doors to the public at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 21 at Fuller Lodge.  The event, which the Los Alamos Arts Council is sponsoring, will kick off the music at 8:15 p.m.  The program will feature compositions for solos, duos and trios.

  • UNM-LA has yoga classes to suit everyone this fall

    Who needs yoga? According to UNM-Los Alamos yoga instructor, Siri Deva Khalsa, the answer is “everyone.”

    “The more civilization progresses, the more we need yoga,” he said.

    For the young, yoga provides mental discipline and good techniques to discipline the mind.

    “Yoga is the perfect antidote to electronic media,” Khalsa said. “While modern media scatters your attention, yoga has the opposite effect.” It helps you focus and relax at the same time.”

  • LAHS 2010 graduates William Finn, Joey Farish and Christian Perea will give their senior recital at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge.

    Sponsored by the Los Alamos Arts Council, the program will consist of jazz, reggae, funk and other styles of music.

  • The next meeting of the Los Alamos Geological Society (LAGS) will be at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Christian Church, 92 East Road.  Joyce A. Guzik, Ph.D., of Los Alamos National Laboratory  will give a talk entitled, “Journey to the Center of the Sun.”

    Although we know more about the sun than any other star, only the surface is directly visible. How

    do we know what is going on inside? This talk will discuss how scientists use a variety of tools, including acoustic waves, to see beneath the sun’s exterior, a subject known as helioseismology.

  •    This is a big weekend for music fans in Los Alamos. At Ashley Pond on Friday night we have the high-energy, theatrical and eclectic European folk music of the Fishtank Ensemble. Starting around 11 a.m. Saturday, right after the County Fair and Rodeo Parade, we’ll have some rock ‘n roll with Taos favorite, the Jimmy Stadler Band.

  • The first week of assets month, has been great. If the community is ready for the game plan, we have one.

    Our plan is to break the assets down into the eight categories and pay tribute to one category a month. The plan will go like this:

    • September — Commitment to learning;

    • October — Support;

    • November — Empowerment;

    • December/January — Positive identity;

    • February — Social competencies;

    • March — Positive values;

  • DALLAS — Adele Costigan, a resident of Los Alamos and a senior at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, is listed on the honor roll with distinction.

    To be listed on the SMU honor roll with distinction, students must be in the top 10 percent of their school of record. SMU’s 2009-2010 enrollment included 11,832 undergraduate students.

  • Editor’s note: Dana Crooks underwent surgery this summer in North Carolina and is recovering. She wrote this story because she wanted to share her experience.

    During the summer, some people go on vacations in paradise or have family reunions to attend. Some people go on road trips across the country. Some get jobs to earn money for college or that new car they want. Others just want to make the best of it and enjoy the break from textbooks and piles of homework.

  • This Friday night we’ll be at the Mari-Mac Shopping Center with Warren Hood and the Marshall Ford Swing Band featuring Emily Gimble. I hope that the weather is something like Wednesday night’s because then the bands will pay us to come here.

    Warren Hood is the fiddler for the Waybacks. Before that, he was the original fiddler for the South Austin Jug Band. Both bands have played great concerts in Los Alamos. He’s all over his violin with all styles of music and has been onstage since he was 4 years old.

  • ESPAÑOLA — Ten years after the Cerro Grande fire damaged it, the Vallecitos de los Caballos Trail (Trail 277) has been re-opened.

    The work was completed earlier this month by a Student Conservation Association (SCA) crew through a Forest Service agreement funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act).

  • Megan Reader, 17, has been selected to represent the United States at the International Tetrathlon Exchange hosted by the USPC Aug. 2-13 in California. The USPC Tetrathlon provides a challenging competition requiring sound, practical horsemanship and general athletic ability. It encourages Pony Club members to broaden their interest in riding, condition their own bodies and become multi-sport athletes.

  • Michele Worley found inspiration close to home for her children’s book, “Buster Goes to the White House.” Her dog Buster was the model for the fictional Buster and the two have a lot in common. Both dogs were adopted from the animal shelter and both are feisty, if small.

    “Buster does all the same things as Buster in the book,” Worley said.

  • The Hot Club of Cowtown returns to the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series at 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond. This will be their fifth LA appearance. They’re exceptionally good and all ages will love them, unless the only music you dig is classical, rap, heavy metal or hip-hop. Even if that’s the case, you can always have a picnic and just check out the scene. On the hottest summer night, it’s always cool on Fridays at the Pond.

  • When I was a kid, growing older seemed to be the best thing that could ever occur. At some point, however, this attitude changed. I now respond to aging with a mixed bag of emotions.

    Sure, you are given certain privileges such as a driver’s license and entry into R-rated movies, but there seem to be more aches and pains as you grow older.  

    During a recent trip to visit my grandparents in Boca Raton, Fla., I learned the scales shift back and forth between the pros and cons as you progress further and further in life.  

  • The month of August is known as the time to head back to school in Los Alamos.

    This year, the Los Alamos County Council will also recognize the month as Assets Month with an official proclamation during their upcoming meeting.

    The goal of a formal proclamation is to bring attention to the community-wide objective of creating a healthy community for youth where they not only survive but thrive.

    The work is done locally with the help of the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce through Assets In Action.

  • Tim Martinez, Los Alamos National Laboratory employee giving specialist, and the staff at Self Help, Inc. ran into a problem that many charitable organizations in small towns face. Their intentions to supply children who are in need with new school materials were overlapping and the two entities found each other stepping and stumbling over each other’s toes.

    To avoid the problem this year, Self Help’s Tools for School and LANL’s backpack drive are teaming up to help children get ready for the school year.

  • There has been a lot of negative information in the news lately about celebrities and businesses. Irrelevant of whether the person or business is guilty or innocent or whether you care about the topic or not, as a society we need to stop having so much negativity.

    The truth is that generally happy, healthy people don’t commit crimes. I’m mainly concerned about this because constant negative attention can drive anyone to the dark side.

  • Two community programs are searching for the next pool of leaders for the community of Los Alamos.

    Leadership Los Alamos and the Los Alamos Youth Leadership programs are finalizing the application process for both programs.

    Friday is the final day to submit applications for the 2010/2011 class of Leadership Los Alamos. This class is for community adults looking to expand their horizons about the community or increase their leadership skills.The program is beneficial to anyone already in a leadership position or hoping to broaden the expertise of their staff members.

  • Does what you learn in the classroom really transpire in the real world? Some cynics might scoff at the idea that an art such as poetry could be useful beyond a school’s walls, but two University of New Mexico-Los Alamos professors prove that poetry has a life after the school bell rings.

    Joan Logghe and Jan Lin  teach poetry writing at the local college. Additionally, they have recently earned recognition for their own literary work.