• Register middle school or high school students for STEM Student Day from 4-7 p.m. Sept. 14.
    Everyone starts off at the Little Theater at 4 p.m. with a character performance of Madame Curie. Then at 5 p.m., walk over to the Bradbury Science Museum and have pizza and attend a program of the students’ choice (required at time of registration). Students choose from: Kraz-E-Science show; Mars-Rover program; or Fire Science program. All programs are limited in size. There will also be an iPad giveaway followed by seeing a domonstration of the Procter & Gamble Corvette with jet engine in the parking lot across the street.
    Register at chamberorganizer.com/members/evr/reg_event.
    The last Los Alamos County Summer Concer Series event of the season will be at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond, featuring Stephanie Hatfield.
    From 11 a.m.-3 p.m.  Sept. 15, The Next Big Idea Festival will be at Fuller Lodge. There will be entertainment planned and food. Kids of all ages, as well as other venues about town such as the Bradbury Science Museum, Recycled Fashion Show down MainStreet, Mesa Pubic Library and parking lot and Central Park Square’s Beer garden at The Park or green area. Go to nextbigideala.com for more information.

  • Benjamin Batha, a junior majoring in computer science at the University of Rochester, has been named to the dean’s list for academic achievement for the spring 2012 semester.
    Batha, a resident of Los Alamos, is the son of Margo and Steven Batha, and a graduate of Los Alamos High School.
    The University of Rochester, founded in 1850, is a private research university located in Rochester, N.Y., (pop. 212,000) on the south shore of Lake Ontario.
    The University offers an undergraduate curriculum, with no required courses, that emphasizes a broad liberal education through majors, minors, and course “clusters”—a Rochester innovation—in the three main areas of knowledge: humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences/engineering.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.
    Ellie — Adult spayed female black Shepherd-mix. Friendly, well-socialized, fine with other dogs.
    Five Border Collie puppies— Four-months-old, four males and one female. They are pretty shy and the volunteers are working on socialization. Keep watching as they develop into fun, approachable pups.
    Naney — Senior brown-and-white English Hound-mix. Owner going abroad. Needs a quiet retirement home. Has reasonable doggy manners. Would be a nice, calm companion in a quiet home.  Will have some tumors removed and a good dental next week.

  • Dick Tatro, Jeanne Butler, and Douglas and Ruth Helmick Lier will be recognized and honored as the newest members of Living Treasures of Los Alamos  on Sept. 9. The ceremony and reception, sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank, will commence at 2 p.m. in the Betty Ehart Senior Center.  The public is invited to attend.
    This event is an opportunity to celebrate the contributions of individuals who have enhanced life on the Hill.  Friends, family and co-workers are encouraged to participate in the ceremony by sharing stories and remembrances about each new Treasure.
    Living Treasures of Los Alamos pays tribute to seniors whose activities have made a notable difference in the quality of life for community residents. These individuals are role models and mentors, providing inspiration as they demonstrate commitment, perseverance, hope, heart and wisdom. Their contributions are diverse but they share a common outlook, which is to live life to the fullest.
    LTLA honors these people by sharing a glimpse into their lives and acknowledging their contributions. More information about the Living Treasures program may be found at livingtreasureslosalamos.org.
    Join friends, family and LTLA in recognizing Dick, Jeanne, Doug and Ruth as they are acknowledged as Living Treasures of Los Alamos.

    Jeanne Butler

  • ‘Bless Me, Ultima’ to be screened in NM after all

    SANTA FE — A movie based on Rudolfo Anaya’s iconic New Mexico-based novel “Bless Me, Ultima” will be screened in the state after all.
    The Albuquerque Journal reports (http://bit.ly/PYalrp) that the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival has scheduled a screening of the film Oct. 17 to kick off the film festival.
    The move comes after producers of the film announced it was to premiere in El Paso, Texas at the historic Plaza Theatre, although the novel is set in the small town of Guadalupe, N.M., during World War II, and the film was entirely shot in New Mexico.
    The novel follows 6-year-old Antonio Marez, and a curandera named Ultima.
    “Bless Me, Ultima” has been credited with sparking the Mexican-American literature movement. It has been banned in some Arizona schools.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.


    Arby’s MJG Corp., 930 Riverside Dr.
    Date inspected: Aug. 22
    Violations: Three moderate-risk violations for other — floor in walk-in cooler rusty, needs cleaning and/or replacement to keep clean. Repeat violation. Back door has cracks/visible light to outdoors, potential to allow mice/insects/vermin inside. Repeat violation. Employees/all food prep./service staff must wear hair restraints. Cap, hat, hair net, etc. Repeat violation. One low-risk violation for administration — repeat violations may lead to permit suspension and/or facility downgrade. Note: as violations continue, they expand/move up to next risk level until corrected or permit suspended. Facility doing better, but facility in bad shape, needs repairs, maintenance. Notable repeat violations could lead to permit suspension. History of repeat violations at this site.
    Notes: Hand wash sink operable, hot/cold water OK. Temperatures overall OK, roast beef hot holding at 145 degrees; cheese cold holding, 40-41 degrees. Three-compartment sink full of utensils. Meat slicer in back needs thorough cleaning, wash, rinse, sanitize in place cleaning. Needs to be cleaned prior to next use.

  • Fine art photographer Craig Varjabedian and the University of New Mexico Press announce an event to benefit The Horse Shelter in Santa Fe, a sanctuary devoted to caring for New Mexico’s abused, abandoned and neglected horses.
    Varjabedian’s new book “Landscape Dreams, A New Mexico Portrait” will officially be available Oct. 1. Before worldwide release of the book, Varjabedian and the University of New Mexico Press are offering four autographed pre-release copies of the book to horse lovers who provide a donation of $250 or more to the Horse Shelter in Santa Fe.
    “Horses are simply amazing and beautiful animals. Some people say they don’t feel affection for their owners, but I disagree. I see love, respect, familiarity, trust — all those emotions mutually between a horse and a man,” Varjabedian wrote in his book “Four and Twenty Photographs: Stories from Behind the Lens.”
    The images range over all the image-making forms — from landscape, portrait and still life — to offer a complete, varied and original portrait of the Land of Enchantment.
    The book contains 90 photographs in a hardcover coffee table book and includes three essays by New Mexico writers. Donations will help support these horses in need.

  • Spend an afternoon with local bird photographer Bob Walker and consider a variety of methods for photographing hummingbirds, from 3-5 p.m. Sept. 8.
    Hummingbirds are colorful summer visitors that can be both challenging and rewarding photographic subjects. Because these little birds are adaptable, relatively fearless and easily attracted to nectar feeders, it’s possible to get nice photographs of them by temporarily turning a part of your backyard into an outdoor photo studio.
    This workshop will start with a setup session showing how to prepare an outdoor studio, and will conclude with a field session in which participants can take some photos, either with their own cameras or using one that Walker will provide. Depending on the number of registrants, additional field sessions may be scheduled so that everyone who wants to take photos will get a chance to do so.
    Equipment available for use at the workshop will include a camera, tripod, hummingbird feeder and camera flashes that are used for flash setups. Participants need only bring their own camera and/or CF or SDHC flash cards. Participant cameras should be able to have the shutter speed, aperture and ISO value set manually. It’s also best if the camera can focus manually and the lens should have a zoom lens with a telephoto setting equivalent to 200mm or more (6x or greater).

  • We would like to thank the community for its support of our third annual High Tea and Fashion Show on Aug. 18, 2012. We served approximately 108 guests.  
    More than 50 volunteers worked for weeks to make this event our most successful fundraising effort,  with the proceeds going toward the costs of our house building mission trips to Juaréz, Mexico.
    The fashions, modeled by 13 ladies, men and children,  were from the Shop on the Corner Thrift Shop, which is open Wednesday mornings on the corner of Diamond and Canyon, across from Griffith Gym.
    In addition, we had a silent auction featuring everything from silk scarves to a wide variety of gift baskets to an airplane ride.
    Several church members donated and prepared the sweets and savories offered, while others, including several members of the youth choir, served our guests.
    We also wish to thank local businesses and individuals who contributed to the event. The Los Alamos Monitor did a beautiful article with color photographs  on the front page of the “Diversions” section.
    KRSN aired an interview with the event chair, RSVP distributed flyers and several people advertised the tea on Facebook. Photos are still posted on the Trinity on the Hill Facebook Group.

  • The Piñon Panthers had a portion of their Change of Heart training on Thursday. The Assets program, sponsored by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board is built on improving school climate. The training kicked off Piñon’s ROPES (Rite Of Passage Experience for Sixth), that took place on Friday.

  • The 2012 Los Alamos Master Gardeners’ Tour welcomed more than 200 visitors to each of five private gardens and more than 100 visitors to the Community Gardens on North Mesa.
    The Master Gardeners thank the garden owners Tony and Shelby Redondo, Martha and Terry Hawkins, Delbert and Shirley Harbur, Pamela and Michael Hundley and Bob and Laurie Walker for sharing their gardens with the community.
    We thank fellow master gardeners, Kimberli Tanner, Barbara Fox and Lee Builta for sharing their gardening expertise as visitors toured the Community Gardens.
    The Los Alamos Extension Office and extension agent Carlos Valdez, provided logistic support. The Los Alamos Monitor, Los Alamos National Bank and the Los Alamos Senior volunteers helped with publicity.
    Master gardeners who served on the garden selection committee and who worked as docents on the tour contributed many hours to the success of this tour.  

    Denise George
    president Los Alamos Master Gardeners

  • Piñon Panther alumni Dallin Stokes has almost completed his Eagle Scout project for Piñon Elementary School. The Los Alamos High School junior worked on behalf of Scout Troop 422. Stokes is quick to praise community members for their  assistance with the project including Lynne Compton at Metzgers who helped to acquire the paint; Piñon personnel; his mother; dedicated mentor and guide Garth Tietjen.
    “Dallin is a wonderful example of a proud Piñon alumnus who is giving back,” said Piñon Principal Jill Gonzales. “Dallin took careful measurements, created scale drawings and meticulously painted each of the 48 contiguous states in a variety of colors — the final product of which looks absolutely wonderful!”
    Stokes hopes to receive a degree in history education at Brigham Young
    University in the future and teach high school or college history.

  • Next week, we begin to focus on an asset of the week, to ensure another year of relationship building.
    This year, I feel like we need a slogan. I won’t give up the ones we already use which are, “Healthy Community, Healthy Youth,” or “Take A Second, Make A Difference.”
    Sometimes I feel like we need something to rally the troops, something to ignite the little fire that makes you want to get something done.
    When we think of asset building, we need to be intentional in our efforts.
    It doesn’t matter if it is eye contact in passing, a friendly nod or an actual conversation, just be aware.
    This is the chance to give students a second chance and help them get on the good path.
    This charge if you will, extends to parents, caregivers, coaches, teachers, staff, neighbors and anyone that associates with kids.
    The work I do isn’t just for those that are in school, it is for anyone interested in building a better community.
    I do tend to focus a lot of working with the schools, but mainly because they are a captive audience.
    I can also work with scouts, church youth groups or whatever adults are open to sharing a few minutes to see how they can do better.

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center is offering two new clubs for kids in grades kindergarten through third: “Nature Detectives” for grade K-1, and “Outdoor Explorers” for grades 2-3. The clubs will begin Sept. 4 and run every Tuesday from 3:45-5:15 p.m., through Nov. 27. Angelique Harshman and Beth Cortright will teach the clubs.
    PEEC’s Nature Clubs are a way to help children connect with the outdoors. Members will investigate local animals and plants and connect with the wild side of the Pajarito Plateau through a variety of activities. Because the clubs are targeted to just two grade levels each, activities will be more age-appropriate than before. Club members hike in the canyon, do science experiments and get in-depth with nature.
    Harshman is an environmental educator with more than 15 years of experience working with kids from preschool to high school age. Cortright is a biologist with a specialty in entomology and has worked with many PEEC programs, including field trips and summer camps.  

  • Elke Duerr of the Web of Life Foundation comes to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 6:30 p.m. Thursday for an interactive presentation about wolves in the Southwest.
    This presentation will be suitable for all ages and will include hands-on activities and documentary film footage.  The talk is free and open to the public.
    Duerr will provide facts about wolves in the state and hands-on experiences from her “wolf trunk.” The audience will be able to see wolf tracks and fur and learn about how researchers radio collar a wolf to track its movements. Participants will be able to howl with wolves on tape and listen to stories of wolf encounters.  
    Duerr will also show footage and stills from her film work about the Mexican Gray Wolves. She will discuss humans’ relationship to the wolf and why we want wolves to remain a part of the wilderness and cultural heritage.
    The Web Of Life Foundation is dedicated to a healthy coexistence between wilderness and civilization, the reconnection of humans to the natural world and the recovery of endangered plant and animal species.
    Come to PEEC to learn about the importance of wolves in the ecosystem. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • In honor of National Farmers’ Market Week 2012 (Aug. 5 -11), the New Mexico Farmers’ Marketing Association announces the New Mexico Farmers’ Market Story Awards, designed to reward and showcase the variety of ways farmers’ markets benefit communities across New Mexico. 
    The NMFMA is looking for essay and/or video submissions from both farmers/producers and customers from all corners of the state that depict concrete examples of farmers’ market impacts.
    Contest entries should answer the question: “How has selling or shopping at a farmers’ market affected you, your farm, your family or your community?
    Submissions might address topics such as: on-farm biodiversity, responsible agricultural production, sustaining family farms (or backyard growers), rural job opportunities, helping your family eat more fruits and vegetables, learning about where your food comes from, or getting to know your community better.
    Prizes will include one grand prize ($250); Best Farmer/Producer Video ($100); Best Farmer/Producer Essay ($100); Best Customer Video ($100 market bucks); Best Customer Essay ($100 market bucks). Honorable mentions will also be awarded.
    Submissions should include essays and/or videos written by or featuring farmers/producers as well as market customers. Submit entries by Sept. 5.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.
    Naney — Senior brown-and-white English Hound-mix. Owner going abroad. Needs a quiet retirement home. Has reasonable doggy manners. Would be a nice, calm companion in a quiet home.  Will have some tumors removed and a good dental next week.
    Phoebe — Young, black female Spaniel-mix. temperament testing shows no aggression or guarding issues. Enjoys being around people. Her choice is not to share her new home with another dog or cat.
    Seren — Shepherd-mix, still very nervous without her owner, who had to move away for a job. Bonds strongly with a single owner.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Bandelier Grill Restaurant/catering, 11 Sherwood Blvd.
    Date inspected: Aug. 17
    Violations: Five high-risk violations, two for improper holding — prep refrigerator in grill area has a temperature of 54 degrees on top and below; two violations for contaminated equipment — slicer and dicer has food product on it. Must be cleaned after each use; no sanitizer available. One violation for plumbing/waste disposal — need two-inch air gap for pipe draining into floor drain in bar area. Two moderate-risk violations for contaminated equipment — food items on floor, floor needs to be cleaned; refrigerator is not NSF, must be removed, can’t use. One low-risk violation for poor personal hygiene — food items stored directly on floor.
    Status of establishment: Approved, follow-up Sept. 1.

    Fabulous 50s mobile unit
    Date inspected: Aug. 14, opening
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Fabulous 50s Diner, 1325 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Aug. 17

  • More than 20 authors and publishers will gather to sell their books Sept. 8 at Fuller Lodge, during the first Los Alamos Book Fair, sponsored by the Los Alamos Historical Society and its publishing venture, Bathtub Row Press.
    Between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., shoppers can meet the authors, discuss their work or pick up a signed copy of a new release to tuck away for a holiday gift. Several recently released titles will be showcased, including Cindy Bellinger’s “Walking on Burnt Mountain, A Spiritual Quest in Los Alamos.”
    And for history buffs interested in the Manhattan Project, Don Farrell’s “Tinian, A Brief History,” has been reissued and will be available. Bathtub Row Press will have the newly-released soft cover of its award-winning book, “At Home on the Slopes of Mountains: The Story of Peggy Pond Church.”
    Shopping and refreshments await visitors to Fuller Lodge, followed by free tours of the Los Alamos Historic District at 3 p.m. for anyone interested in the stories associated with Ashley Pond, the Ice House Memorial and the log and stone houses of Bathtub Row, a preview of the proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

  • Five Los Alamos households will open their yards to the public from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday as part of the Master Gardener’s Tour.
    The tour is in its 10th year and is produced by the Los Alamos Master Gardeners, in conjunction with the Los Alamos Extension Office and Los Alamos Extension Agent Carlos Valdez.  Gardeners and homeowners looking for answers to questions about growing vegetables and flowers in the area, as well as those looking for landscaping ideas, might enjoy the tour.
    According to Master Gardener Denise George, it will include a variety of approaches to landscape design.
    “The gardens on this tour are very different. Some lots are large and others small. All five residential gardens feature outdoor living space, some have ponds and other water features, most incorporate vegetable areas into their gardens, some emphasize attracting birds and other wildlife, some were designed to require little maintenance,” George said.
    “Visitors should expect to leave with ideas that they might incorporate into their own landscapes. At each location, visitors will be able to ask master gardeners any questions they might have.”
    This year, the following residents will be make up the tour:
    • Shelby and Tony Redondo, 390 Manhattan Loop