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Features

  • The League of Women Voters will have Greg Fisher, Los Alamos’ Economic Vitality administrator, as the guest speaker at the League of Women Voters Lunch with a Leader at 11:45 a.m. June 14.
    The luncheon will be at  the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, 3540 Orange St. (small building across from the back of the high school). Ruby K’s will provide lunch.
    When RSVPing, you will be able to order the sandwich or salad you would like to have. Chips, pickles, and cookies will accompany the meal and water will be  provided.  
    The total cost will be just $12, which includes tax and gratuity.
    Fisher has worked in numerous communities  doing just what he plans to do in our community.

  • Dog Jog 2012 thank you

    Cool and cloudy weather provided perfect conditions for hearty exercise and the runners and walkers and their eager dogs enjoyed themselves thoroughly at the 15th Annual Dog Jog on April 28.
    This year’s Dog Jog, organized by the Atomic City Roadrunners, the Los Alamos Dog Obedience Club and the Mountain Canine Corps (MC2) search and rescue team raised $11,000 for Friends of the Shelter.  Friends of the Shelter is a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to abandoned animals and to pets and their owners in north central New Mexico.
    Our catastrophic care program pays for veterinary care for sick or injured animals that have no owners or whose owners cannot afford the treatment.

  • If you haven’t had a chance to get over to the polls to vote yet, what are you waiting for?
    Grab the kids and take them with you to demonstrate the value of the process.
    I remember being an 18-year-old and so excited to vote for the first time. I hope today, parents are still encouraging youth to do the same.
    It only takes a few minutes and I think it is important to illustrate that there are many people defending your right to do it. The many service men and women are also working to provide that right for others, as well.
    When we get lost in thinking about how much it costs do things and who gets in trouble for what, we forget one of the things that make us one of the world’s greatest countries: the right to vote.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love.
    Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are microchipped.

    DOGS
    Conan - Not a barbarian! A year-old male fawn-colored GSD-mix. Slender, long legs. He is still adjusting to the shelter, but is reported to be great with kids and compatible with other dogs. Housebroken.

  • Last Wednesday, State Farm agent Lou Santoro, along with the Good Neigh-bear, LAPS School Board President Kevin Honnell and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board’s Morrie Pongratz, broke out the gold shovels to break ground on the future site of the Los Alamos Youth Food Project. Los Alamos Middle School Principal Rex Kilburn, with the help of LAPS Business Manager John Wolfe, have helped the Los Alamos Middle School Project come to fruition thanks to a State Farm Youth Advisory Board grant.Volunteers willing to assist with the project can call The Family YMCA’s Sylvan Argo at 662-3100.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Golden Dog Nostrani
    Date inspected: May 23, closing
    Status of establishment: Closed

    Holiday Inn Express, 3450 Cerrillos Road
    Date inspected: May 24
    Violations: One high-risk violation for unsafe sources — one item held in refrigerator for more than seven days. Item destroyed. Corrected.
    Notes: Not approved for cooling foods — only heat and serve.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Los Postores, 1406 Third St., Suite C
    Date inspected: May 21, pre-opening, opening
    Violations: None

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Summer Family Evenings program will kick off with a Taxidermy Museum with animals from Yukon Wildlife Studio June 5.
    Visitors are welcome to drop in any time between 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. The event is free for PEEC members and $5 per family for non-members at the door.

  • T. Jackson King, archaeologist, science fiction author and poet, will read from “Mother Earth’s Stretch Marks” at 6 p.m. June 7 at Ruby K’s Bagel Café.
    Tickets to the event are $10, which includes the book and refreshments, and will be available at the door the night of the event. Otowi Station Bookstore and Ruby K’s are sponsoring the event.
    In a recent interview, King discussed his poetry about the natural world.

  • A quick drive through Taos yields little more than scenic beauty. However, that’s one of the things that attracts visitors to the town. Taking time to explore the downtown area will reveal not only a place that’s rich in history, but also an extensive art scene.
    Those who have visited — and fell in love with — Santa Fe are sure to enjoy Taos. Surrounded by the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the area offers a variety of outdoor activities such as skiing, hiking, fishing, whitewater rafting, climbing, llama trekking, camping, horseback riding and of course, a plethora of art galleries, shops and restaurants.

  • Some staff members at Los Alamos Middle School are working hard to build the 40 Developmental Assets in students — and one is igniting a passion and making learning fun.
    Los Alamos Middle School teacher Caroline Haagenstad builds on the passions of her students with the GATE Passion Project, work that takes place throughout the school year.
    Recently, students had their projects on display and one definitely stood out.
    It’s not everyday that a student is encouraged to graffiti a school, but teacher Naomi Unger urged seventh grade student Evan Oro to do just that.
    The project was done through a process, which included involvement from Los Alamos Middle School Principal Rex Kilburn.

  • Good community citizens are not hard to come by in our small town.  We have those who care for the elderly and those who care for the very young.  The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation wishes to express its sincere thanks to the longtime proprietors of Central Avenue Grill, Min and Monica Park.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will have shorter hours for its free Nature Playtimes starting in June, and will also have a new teacher for the preschool program.  
    PEEC’s Nature Playtimes offer a chance for the youngest kids to get out and enjoy nature on the Pajarito Plateau.
    Each session offers time to explore outside, a craft or sensory activity and stories and songs. The program is free and open to all, with no registration required.  
    Nature Playtimes have been running from 10-11:30 a.m. on Mondays.  Beginning June 4, the structured part of the program will be from 10-11 a.m.  

  • Barnabas Collins has risen once again and is stalking the town of Collinsport, Maine.
    Director Tim Burton and actor Johnny Depp have teamed up yet again to bring all that is creepy, dark and sinister to the silver screen. This time, their efforts have resulted in “Dark Shadows.”
    Based on the TV series that ran from 1966-1971, the movie revolves around Barnabas (Depp), an imprisoned vampire, forced to live in a coffin underground, as punishment for scorning the witchy Angelique Bouchard (Eva Green), with whom he had an affair two centuries prior to his imprisonment.

  • Imagine a place where technology does not exist. There are no smart phones, e-readers, computers, Internet connections or even telephones. It’s a place where people cultivated gardens to grow food to feed the family, raised livestock and depended on wood to heat their homes.
    Such a place may seem like a distant memory or something out of a story about the Wild West, but it does exist. It’s called El Rancho de las Golondrinas and it’s located on the outskirts of Santa Fe, tucked away from the interstate traffic and hustle and bustle of downtown. Located on 200 acres of farmland, the living history museum is dedicated to showing visitors how 18th and 19th century New Mexicans lived.

  • Teens attend a Co-op Rocks event at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Saturday. Youth played games with Assets In Action, spoke with representatives from the Los Alamos Historical Museum, learned about second-hand smoke and rocked out with bands. The band seen here is made up of members of the Teen Center staff including Director Michelangelo Lobato, left. LACM Outreach Coordinator Sandra West pulled together the event with the help of teens.

  • Self Help, Inc., a Los Alamos non-profit organization, plans a June 1 launch for 2-1-1, an online and telephone information and referral service.
    The service aims to connect people searching for help and social service agencies around Rio Arriba, Taos and Los Alamos counties with the appropriate agency.
    The 2-1-1 service is sponsored and supported by United Way of Northern New Mexico and links to other United Way agency-sponsored 2-1-1 centers throughout the country.
    The service is free and easy to use.  Anyone seeking a general service or a specific agency can dial 211, 855-662-6211 (toll free) or 662-6211 (Los Alamos).  

  • Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series presents Frances Levine speaking on the topic of colonial New Mexico’s history at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
     In this New Mexico Centennial year, Levine will touch briefly on the 100 years of New Mexico’s statehood and then explore Gov. Bernardo López de Medizábal’s wife, Doña Teresa’s role in the state’s colonial past.

    About Doña Teresa de Aguilera
    y Roche:

  • As I have said before, generally it takes more than a one-time lesson or event for something to become a learned behavior.
    On Monday, students of the Chamisa Elementary sixth grade leadership team became the teachers as they presented, “All Kids Can.”
    The All Kids Can assembly was another opportunity to educate kids and adults, that the “R” word is wrong. The “R” word in this case is retarded.
    The team made up of Robyn, Priyanka, Sean, Colin, Youssef and Jenny, with the assistance of parent Rebecca Hollis and Chamisa Elementary Teacher Jennifer Kieltyka walked the audience through the thought process of why saying the word retarded, even as a joke, is wrong.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love.
    Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are microchipped.

    DOGS
    Daisy — Three year old female Rottie-mix. A nice dog, but very strong. Would benefit from leadership and calm and consistent training. Former owner says she’s good with kids.
    Ollie —Gentle, older red Chow-mix. Calm, would be good in a quiet home. She is protective of her food, so we suggest a home with children older than 12.

  • It’s no secret that teaching youngsters to read at an early age will help them in school later on. In fact, research shows that most children can read by age seven, but the foundation for learning begins at birth.
    Sigma Delta, a Los Alamos Youth Leadership team, recognizes the importance of literacy and has been trying to do its part to help youth in the community.
    For several months, the team, under the guidance of Los Alamos High School senior and LAYL member Jin Park, planned to visit LAPS elementary schools. In early May, it executed its plan, visiting Barranca Elementary.