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Features

  • Tim Martinez, Los Alamos National Laboratory employee giving specialist, and the staff at Self Help, Inc. ran into a problem that many charitable organizations in small towns face. Their intentions to supply children who are in need with new school materials were overlapping and the two entities found each other stepping and stumbling over each other’s toes.

    To avoid the problem this year, Self Help’s Tools for School and LANL’s backpack drive are teaming up to help children get ready for the school year.

  • There has been a lot of negative information in the news lately about celebrities and businesses. Irrelevant of whether the person or business is guilty or innocent or whether you care about the topic or not, as a society we need to stop having so much negativity.

    The truth is that generally happy, healthy people don’t commit crimes. I’m mainly concerned about this because constant negative attention can drive anyone to the dark side.

  • Two community programs are searching for the next pool of leaders for the community of Los Alamos.

    Leadership Los Alamos and the Los Alamos Youth Leadership programs are finalizing the application process for both programs.

    Friday is the final day to submit applications for the 2010/2011 class of Leadership Los Alamos. This class is for community adults looking to expand their horizons about the community or increase their leadership skills.The program is beneficial to anyone already in a leadership position or hoping to broaden the expertise of their staff members.

  • Does what you learn in the classroom really transpire in the real world? Some cynics might scoff at the idea that an art such as poetry could be useful beyond a school’s walls, but two University of New Mexico-Los Alamos professors prove that poetry has a life after the school bell rings.

    Joan Logghe and Jan Lin  teach poetry writing at the local college. Additionally, they have recently earned recognition for their own literary work.

  • For some people, it’s a hobby – a real passion. They set the alarm so they can cruise the streets early to look for the perfect spot and beat the crowds.

    For those who love garage sales, it is not just about getting a certain item but also achieving the perfect price.

    From 10 a.m.-1 p.m. July 24, these bargain hunters will get the deal of a lifetime.

    First Baptist Church is hosting a garage sale where everything from the clothing to furniture is free.

  • Math should not be something to fear. In fact, if approached from the right perspective, the subject can be fun.

    The Los Alamos Branch of American Association of University Women (AAUW), in conjunction with Mesa Public Library Family Night, is showing off this sometimes overlooked side of math during the Let’s Read Math Program at 7 p.m. Monday at Mesa Public Library. The program will present “Grand Father Tang’s Story.”

  • Since he was a boy growing up on the border of Texas and Mexico, Eliseo Torres, known to everyone as ‘Cheo,’ has been fascinated by the folk traditions and ways of Mexico and of his Mexican-American roots.

    Both of his parents were versed in aspects of herbal lore and healing, and as he matured he learned from them a love and respect for the history and folk knowledge of the ancient art of curanderismo, or Mexican folk healing.

  • Author Jacqueline Kelly will sign her 2010 Newberry Honor Book, “The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate,” at 1 p.m. Thursday at Otowi Station. Not only can readers meet with Kelly, but they can share a lunch with her as well. There will be a dutch-treat luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at the Hill Diner.

  • Like oil and water, black and white, night and day, fine art and folk art seem to have nothing in common. They’re complete opposites.

    Fine art is formal, professional, and feature traditional themes such as landscapes and still life. While folk art is untraditional and democratic – anyone can create a piece of folk art.

  • Los Alamos has the highest number of people with PhDs per capita in the country, many of whom  are inventors and scientists, which is why it’s only logical to host the 3rd annual “Next Big Idea” festival – a festival of discovery, invention and innovation – Saturday with STEM Student Day on Friday.

  • Filling July 4 up with music

    It was very exciting for the LAHS Bands to once again be able to participate in this year’s Fourth of July festivities.  

    The products that we’re sold added to the celebration. All of the proceeds directly benefit the operation of the bands.

    We have many activities planned for the coming year including two major marching competitions, honor bands, guest artists who will perform with us, clinicians and a spring trip. Fundraisers such as this one allow us to do all of these things.

  • It wasn’t generally how I spend a Wednesday morning – inspecting the nooks and crannies of the exteriors of airplane hangars, which neatly line up one right after another along the runway at Los Alamos County Airport.

    If I hadn’t been so fixated on spotting a peculiar lump or bump on the smooth asphalt, I would have probably appreciated the cool morning breeze and the perfect cloudless sky.

    I would have enjoyed the fact that I was spending at least a few minutes of the morning in the fresh air rather than in the office.

  • At 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond, the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series will present the Sisters Morales at Ashley Pond.

    Sisters Morales plays rock clubs, cantinas, dancehalls, performing arts centers, festivals, concert halls, blues bars and honky-tonks all over the country.

    The sister played the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., the Voices of Latin Rock Festival in San Francisco, Willie Nelson’s 4th of July Picnic, Taste of Chicago, the George Strait Country Music Festival, the Kerrville Folk Festival and the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series.

  • Looking at a mirror can be a disagreeable experience. Sometimes the reflection isn’t what you were hoping to see.

  • Summer time is a great chance to build the Assets of Family Communication and Support with a little something called the family vacation. After I write that sentence, in the back of my mind I hear, dun, dun, dun.

    The family vacation, no matter how monotonous, can be memories that last a life time. If they do, as adults, we should try to make them as good as possible.

    Now for those of you who don’t know me very well, I’m as cheap as the day is long, so I certainly don’t mean a trip where we indulge in every purchase the dears would enjoy.

  • From a sponge toss to sack races, the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints White Rock ward offered fun for all ages July 3 at the church.

     

  • Everyone has felt as though they were stuck in a rut. The routine feels too familiar and perhaps a little flat. Sometimes a change is in order – to shake things up and re-energize people.

    Grace Vineyard Christian Fellowship is following this attitude with two upcoming conferences.

    The first one, which begins today and runs through Sunday, features John Sullivan, Jr., the son of the church’s pastor, Rev. Jack Sullivan. Sullivan, Jr. will be accompanied by his wife, Sofia and Kolynn Hansen.

  • Running, shooting, swimming and horse riding – these are well-established sports but combined altogether, something unique arises.

    A tetrathlon may sound unusual but it is a sport that is widely held.

    Additionally, three girls from Los Alamos recently proved they excel at this sport.

    Madeline Beck, Rachel Brenner and Mariah Bayless of the Los Alamos Pony Club achieved first place as a team in the Rocky Mountain Regional Mega Rally Tetrathlon.

  • For 42 years, the Los Alamos Historical Society has operated the Los Alamos History Museum but as the society turns its attention to the house formerly owned by Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, it finds itself in unfamiliar territory.

    Fortunately, the historic society earned a $3,750 grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council as well as a $2,400 grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. These grants will offer guidance to the society as it begins initial steps to operate a historic home museum.

  • After the excitement, sturm und drang of Friday night’s season opening, Saturday’s second opening felt more relaxed, less crowded, more casual, less pressured  and the weather was calmer, too.  

    Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” (1791) is the ultimate kid friendly opera, and we did indeed see several beautiful little girls in beautiful little dresses; but I’m sorry to say this production will leave the kids bored instead of dazzled.