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Features

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Aspen Lounge, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — sanitizer didn’t have solution made. One cap of bleach per one gallon of warm water. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Hilltop House Convenience Store, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Los Alamos Holiday Inn Express, 60 Entrada Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: Three high-risk violations, two for improper holding — milk, refrigerator needs to be turned down. Corrected; eggs without shell at 45 degrees, corrected, thrown out; sausage at 170 degrees, corrected and thrown out. Food handler said she turned off warmer over half an hour ago, since no customers. One for poor personal hygiene — hand wash sink needs paper towels. Corrected.
    Notes: Milk display refrigerator needs temperature turned down. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Santa Fe

    Classic Fare and Catering

  • Finding a decent Northern New Mexican meal on the Hill is not an easy task. In fact, it’s nearly impossible.
    Yes, there are restaurants that churn out Northern New Mexican food, but there’s always something missing.
    Sometimes the dishes lack flavor and sometimes the chile is no more than bland chile water. There’s no heat and there’s no flavor. Until now.
    DeColores Restaurant has been at the same location for years. It’s on the edge of town, so it’s sometimes forgotten. But it’s well worth your while to have a meal or two there.
    On a recent Thursday evening, the restaurant was practically empty.
    A singer/guitarist entertained the handful of patrons scattered about the dining area.
    One look at the menu and it was evident that things had changed.
    The prices had gone up slightly, but there was also a lot more to choose from.
    In addition to the traditional Northern New Mexican fare, the restaurant also offers a variety of hamburgers, salads and other items.
    It was hard to make a decision about what to order, but the waitress was patient, coming back a couple of times before a decision was made.
    In the meantime, free chips and salsa were offered to munch away on as the menu was browsed. The chips were good.

  • The Dia de los Muertos show at Northern New Mexico College has become an annual tradition.
    Now in its fourth year, the show will once again feature 16 artists from Northern New Mexico and beyond, displaying their best interpretations of the Day of the Dead. The man behind the show is Española’s Toby Morfin. For the past few years, Morfin has curated the show, all in an effort to share his — and other artists’ — talent with valley residents and those from surrounding areas. This year, Española artist Cruz Lopez also helped curate the show.
    The type of work displayed is as varied as the artists that create it. A good portion of the artists have done the show before, but there are also some new faces this year. Rachel Montoya is one of the newbies. Montoya, a jewelry artist, collaborated with Arturo Montaño for this exhibit. But she’s no stranger to exhibiting her work. In fact, she won first place for jewelry at this year’s Spanish Market.
    “It’s nice to add her to the show,” Morfin said. He said the show continues to improve each year and has attracted a big audience.

  • As Director of the Betty Ehart Senior Center and as a music therapist, Pauline Schneider sees both the difficulties dementia sufferers and their caregivers face daily and also how music and the arts can help people connect and enjoy the  arts’ effects.
    “I have worked with people in all phases of dementia and even those who seem to have stopped relating to the world around them, remarkably respond to music. One person, who hadn’t spoken for quite some time, began to sing along with a familiar tune from decades ago and knew all the words, stayed on key and stayed focused until it was over,” Schneider said.
    She invited Mary Yamada of the Los Alamos Retirement Community, who has worked with people with dementia for 15 years and Carol Meine of Mesa Public Library arts programming, to get together and create a pilot program for people with dementia and their caregivers to meet in a non-clinical setting to enjoy the arts together.

  • Carole Rinard, a local needlework master, received the Gold Thread Award on Oct. 28 at the 2012 national seminar of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, at Buffalo Thunder Resort in Pojoaque.
    This annual award is given to individuals who have given freely of their time and talents to best exemplify the EGA mission of fostering the highest standards of excellence in the practice of the art of embroidery. Carole is being honored at both the regional and national level for her life-long dedication to fiber arts.
    Upon moving to Los Alamos in 1981, Rinard immediately became active in the Embroiderers Guild at the local, regional and national levels.
    She received the Rocky Mountain Region’s first Clare Award in 1989 for outstanding service to the region. In 2004, she was the chairperson of the EGA 18th National Exhibit, which opened in Los Alamos in April of that year. As an EGA Master Needlework Judge, she has judged fiber arts at venues throughout the country.
    Rinard has exhibited widely and won awards for her needlework in Kansas and New Mexico. In 1995, she was one of 100 EGA needle artists to be selected to stitch an ornament for the White House’s Blue Room Christmas Tree.
    The ornament “New Fallen Snow at the Santa Fe Opera” is in the permanent collection of the Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C.

  • The League of Women Voters will have their monthly Lunch with a Leader at 11:45 a.m. Nov. 8 at Mesa Library.
    Their leader in November will be the new County Attorney Becky Ehler.
    After working in Alamogordo for 19 years as the city attorney and as the legal advisor to the City’s Department of Public Safety, she came to Los Alamos in June 2012 with her husband of 34 years.
    They purchased a house in White Rock where they live with the animals their kids left behind when they moved out.
    Ehler has worked in Gallup and Roswell and had brief experience with the federal government as a summer intern in a congressional office.
    Ehler thinks working in local government is the best  choice because of the increased opportunity to directly interact with residents.
    She also believes she has a better opportunity to make an impact on the community at this level. “ It’s very gratifying to be able to see the outcome of a project upon which I have worked and see the genuine benefit to the citizens at the end of the project.”
    The event is open to the public. To attend, call Karyl Ann Armbruster at 661-6605 or email her at kaskacayman@gmail.com. Food is ordered from the co-op.
    The meal includes a sandwich or soup or salad and half-sandwich and a cookie for $10.  

  • We are so close to the end of October, that we will look ahead to November and a focus on the asset category of empowerment.
    This asset category contains assets seven through 10 and include; community values youth, youth as resources, service to others and safety.
    The assets program was disappointed when our Night in Italy event was forced to cancel, due to low-ticket sales.
    Perhaps it was timing, perhaps it was cost or perhaps there were too many events on the calendar.
    What I do know is that 100 percent of time was donated to make the effort a go. The assets program didn’t spend a penny in cost to attempt this fundraiser.
    Our thanks to local caterer Jarda Belmonte, who had the gumption to try something new to benefit youth development programs in our community.
    On a positive note, our Smith’s Change For Change collection earned our program $175.75 in donations and for that, I thank you.
    Our reason for fundraising is to at least make an attempt at sustainability. This is a part- time program and with additional funds, we could do so much more.
    The second reason is that we started the year with a $5,000 reduction in budget and must always anticipate that to happen in consecutive years.

  • Alleged hauntings and ghost sightings of places where accidents and tragedies occurred is not uncommon. In fact, there are many places throughout the state that are said to be haunted, so it should come as no surprise that the New Mexico State Penitentiary’s Old Main facility is on that list — especially since it was the site of a vicious riot in 1980.

    Inmates at the Penitentiary of New Mexico, overtook prison guards in the early morning hours of Feb. 2, 1980. Fed up with airing grievances about overcrowding, substandard food and the treatment of some prisoners — that seemed to fall on deaf ears — they decided to take action.

    During a routine inspection in one of the dormitories, the inmates overtook four prison guards and took them hostage. They then went to another dormitory, where another four guards were taken hostage. They continued to take hostages until they had acquired a total of 12. 

    During their initial assault, they were able to gain access of the control center, where they were able to get keys for the five grill gates in the prison. What happened after that will forever be etched in New Mexico history. For 36 hours, prisoners and guards alike, were tortured, beat, stabbed and raped. There were also several overdoses after the rioters gained access to the prison pharmacy.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    DOGS
    Autumn — This spayed female is one of those rare breeds that doesn’t come around very often — a New Mexico Brown Dog. She is housebroken and leash-trained, just don’t try to force her to be friends with any dog smaller than her.
    Axle — Axle is a playful and affectionate neutered male. The shelter temperament testers describe this Pit-mix as a total sweetheart. He would love a family that appreciates big, sloppy dog kisses.
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.

  • Five precision shooters from Los Alamos High school NJROTC went to Colorado Springs to the Olympic Training Center to compete in the Men’s and Women’s Air Rifle portion of the monthly tournament Oct. 19. The course of fire at a distance of 10 meters for men is 60 shots and for women 40 shots in the standing position. The top shooter for the team was Brandon Frank with a 557. Samuel Wolfe was second with a 547, both exceeding the necessary score of 534 to qualify for the Distinguished Expert Badge for international. Tessa Snyder fired a 345/400 just one point below the Distinguished Badge qualifying score. Former cadet Cory Miller also traveled from The University of New Mexico to Colorado Springs to participate in this event. In December, the five cadets will fire qualifying matches in both air rifle and small bore for the Junior Olympics in March 2013.

  • The Rising Moon Gallery will host a potluck and ceremony to honor the victims of genocide around the world from 5-7 p.m. Nov. 2.
    Bones made of clay, by adults and children of the Abiquiu community, will be laid out in a ceremony to honor the victims of genocide.
    The making of the bones is a community project that supports the national One Million Bones project.
    The One Million Bone project allows participants to showcase their creativity and join a global community working to end genocide by making a bone and/or sponsoring a bone for $5.  
    Proceeds are donated to direct service and advocacy organizations through the One Million Bones project headquartered in Albuquerque.
    Bones made at the Rising Moon Gallery and at the Abiquiu Elementary School and La Puerta School will be transported to Albuquerque to become part of a national installation in Washington, D.C. at the National Mall on June 8, 2013.
    One Million Bones is a fundraising art installation and education project designed to recognize the millions of victims killed or displaced by ongoing genocides.
    Its mission is to increase global awareness of the ongoing devastation of genocide, raise $5 million to protect and aid displaced victims and educate students about tolerance through art and social activism.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Española

    Chili’s Bar and Grill, Riverside Drive
    Date inspected: Oct. 18
    Violations: Two high-risk violations, one for improper holding — rice, shrimp holding at 79 degrees, 56 degrees. Staff in process of cooling with ice. Corrected. One violation for contaminated equipment — can opener dirty, still in use. Advised manager, removed. Corrected. Two moderate-risk violations, one for contaminated equipment — cutting boards scarred up, need table replaced or resurfaced. One violation for other — some staff not wearing hair net, hair restraints, caps. Repeat violation. Two low-risk violations, one for floors/walls/ceilings — food debris on floor, wall corner. One violation for storage — box food on floor in walk-ins. Note, facility very busy during inspection.
    Notes: Facility doing overall OK. High-risk violations corrected on site. Water heater having problems, but hot water was present during inspection.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Home Run Pizza, 1031 N. Riverside Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 16, opening
    Violations: None

  • The 19th annual High-Tech Halloween Friday at the Bradbury Science Museum combines science and engineering in a “spooktacular” setting.
    Between 4 and 6:30 p.m., visitors to the museum can learn many things pertaining to Mars, with three feature presentations on robotics, cryogenics and physics. Learn what the LANL-built ChemCam is discovering on its exploration of the Mars surface.Watch old movie clips that show how Mars has been portrayed.
    Visitors also can see Earth critters like scorpions and spiders and learn about DNA, the basic building block of life on Earth.
    “The whole family can have a ‘spooktacular’ time you’ll remember the whole year,” said Bradbury Science Museum Director Linda Deck.
    High-Tech Halloween is part of Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation’s “Trick or Treat on MainStreet.”
    There is never an admission fee to events at the Bradbury Science Museum. The museum is located at 15th Street and Central Avenue in downtown Los Alamos and is open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, and from 1-5 p.m. Sunday and Monday.
    To get more information on activities at the museum call 667-4444.

  • On Friday the Los Alamos MainStreet’s Annual Trick or Treat on MainStreet will be from 4 p.m.-6:30 p.m. with an estimated 3,000 people gathering in downtown Los Alamos.  
    Local businesses and organizations will open their doors and set up booths along Central Avenue and down Main Street to give out treats to the community’s trick-or-treaters.
    The Hillstompers will perform and the New Mexico Dance Theater will have a street dance at 5:30 p.m., followed by Hallowiener Parade around 6 p.m.
    In addition to the festivities along MainStreet:
    • The YMCA will hold their Costume Climb and InterGLOWatic spacewalk from 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m.
    • The Bradbury Science Museum High Tech Halloween will be from 4 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
    • Los Alamos Medical Center will have their trick-or-treating from 3-5 p.m.
    On Saturday, the festivities will continue. The day will start off with Ruby K’s Yum Run at 8 a.m., then a community pumpkin carving will be from 10 a.m.-noon at Fuller Lodge. Pumpkins will then be displayed at the Pumpkin Glow at Fuller Lodge on the lawn. The Nomads will play from 6-9 p.m. inside Fuller Lodge.
    Los Alamos National Bank, Compa Industries, The Education Plan, Del Norte Credit Union, Los Alamos Medical Center and Los Alamos County sponsor the MainStreet event.

  • The community will be treated to an evening of glowing Jack o’ lanterns. Beginning at 6 p.m. Saturday, the Los Alamos Arts Council will present its 11th annual Pumpkin Glow on the Fuller Lodge lawn.  
    This event features hundreds of pumpkins carved by community members. Everyone is encouraged to participate by dropping off carved pumpkins Saturday on the Fuller Lodge lawn.
    The event, sponsored by Smith’s Food and Drug, Village Arts, Los Alamos National Bank and MainStreet will feature hundreds of pumpkins designed and carved by everyone, from young children to professional artists. Creations of all sorts will glimmer in the night.
    Some highlights from past Pumpkin Glows include carvings of historical world landmarks, tributes to the armed forces, Alfred Hitchcock-themed pumpkins, totem poles of carved Tiki patterns and a wide variety of creepy creatures created by local Boy Scouts.
    A new addition has been the animated ghosts and pumpkins appearing in and out of the windows at Fuller Lodge, accompanied by Halloween music. Once again, this will be part of the event. Sponsor logos will dance across Fuller Lodge as a part of the animation. Groups can also create spooky scenes such as the cemetery, done by the scouts each year.

  • Community members are invited to visit the Scholastic Book Fair online at the Los Almaos Middle School web site. The online store will offer books for all age levels and will be available on the web site from Oct. 28-Nov. 17. All books will be delivered free to the library and held until parents or students pick them up.
    The Middle School Scholastic Book Fair will be in the library portable and will not be as large as normal, due to size constraints. The book fair will be from 7:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 5-9.

  • The Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos will hold its annual fall pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center—and this year, the breakfast will feature a Halloween twist.
    The serving line, staffed by Kiwanis members and volunteers from Kiwanis-affiliated youth organizations, will provide pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, coffee, juice and milk. Seconds will be available until the food runs out.
    During the breakfast, from 9 a.m.-9:30 a.m., costumed witches will “fly” through the dining room, distributing wrapped candies to children.
    Kiwanis are selling tickets and tickets will also be available at the door. The cost is $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens and $4 for children.
    Kiwanis uses the proceeds from the fall breakfast to support a long list of service projects. Among them are: college scholarships; the Senior Appreciation Night Breakfast; the Fourth of July Fireworks at Overlook Park; Breakfast with Santa; Los Alamos Science Fair prizes distributed by Kiwanis; and Kiwanis children’s organizations including Key Club, Builders Club, K-Kids at Barranca and K-Kids at Aspen.

  • Recently, the Chamisa Elementary PTO celebrated three students’ reading efforts over the summer, with the help of the local Masons.The students were awarded bicycles. Pictured from left to right are: Norissa Valdez, third grade; Susan Herrera; Jake Turin, Mason representative; Nate Turner, fifth grade; and and Malachi Laskie, kindergarten. C Students that read during the summer assist the retention of knowledge from the previous school year. The work with the Masons has aided the summer reading program of kindergarten through sixth graders. Students have been known to increase their reading time, recorded in minutes, into the hundreds and in some cases, the thousands.

  • Parent involvement in schooling is our focus this week. This is defined as parents being actively engaged in helping their children succeed in school.
    There are so many ways to be involved. From checking, — but not hovering over Powerschool — to attending school events and supporting school efforts, the possibilities are endless.
    This year, elementary parents will be able to check Poweschool for some grades and I caution parents not to go over the deep end with this opportunity.
    Use this year as a training ground for preparing for middle school.
    If there’s one thing I could tell you, it is to provide opportunities for your student to accomplish an assignment over several days or weeks before it is due.
    The science fair, for example, is one way that you can remind students not to save everything for the weekend before the project is due.
    The goal is not to help your student so much that they don’t accomplish the goal on their own. If everything is saved until the day before it is due, then let them sweat it out. Let them have to sacrifice something fun, a game, an event, some television or video game playing to finish the project. If you save the day every time, it will come back to bite you in the butt, I promise.

  • The rumors persist that the old Line Camp building in Pojoaque is haunted. The building has been standing for nearly 100 years and has been host to a variety of businesses. It has served mainly as a tavern, with many locals having fond memories of their visits there.

    Recently, an older gentleman who has been associated with the Line Camp for years shared some of the stories and experiences related to the historical building. Some stories are chilling and some are related to local folklore. However, one thing is certain — the tumultuous history of the place has left a mark on this old wooden building.

    The Tavern Cat
    There once was an old drunkard who practically lived at the tavern. He was a permanent fixture at the bar. After many years of patronage, the old man acquired an illness that kept him away from his beloved tavern. He was bedridden and eventually passed away.