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Features

  • Assets In Action and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board teamed up with the Youth Activity Center recently for Minute to Win it. Assets In Action will host another Minute To Win It from 7-8 p.m. July 20 in the LAHS Auxiliary Gym. Admission is $2. All ages are invited and players will be selected from the crowd to compete for prizes. For more information or to sponsor a prize, call 661-4846.

     

  • Help with Cub Scout camp
    is appreciated

    I would like to extend my whole-hearted thanks to all who spend so much of their time helping the boys at our Day Camp.
    We moved the camp from our usual place at the Sportsmen’s Club to the Los Alamos Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints due to the extreme dryness in the canyon.
    I would also like to thank the church for allowing us to use their facilities on such short notice.
    Hopefully we will be back in Rendija Canyon next year.
    We had somewhere in the neighborhood of 150 total boys attend. And to do that, we needed at least 87 adults at one day each. The parents, friends and grandparents came through like the troopers they are.

  • Asset number 25 is “reading for pleasure,” and there’s no better time than the summer to make it happen.
    This asset would ideally have youth reading for three or more hours per week and sometimes summer time is the only time parents or caregivers can make that happen.
    Chamisa Librarian Lisa LaPrairie-Whitacre wanted students to retain their reading skills over the summer, so they come back to school ready to learn. To help out with that effort, she combined a variety of resources into a helpful little handout to assist parents and caregivers in accomplishing that goal.

  • Local Scouts gathered recently for their annual Day Camp. This year fire concerns moved the event from Rendija Canyon to the LDS Church in Los Alamos.

  • The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation announced the winners of its spring Great Ideas Grants.  There are two grant cycles for the Great Ideas Grants, one in spring and one in fall. The application is downloadable from the Foundation’s web site at www.lapsfoundation.com.
    Stacey Martens and Sheri Davis of Aspen Elementary were awarded $1,098 for a project called, “For the Love of Math I and II.” This project will allow 14 teachers to attend the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics regional conference in Albuquerque.  

  • Ever wondered what you would do if suddenly found yourself lost in the woods? Would you like to know that your kids would be okay if they strayed from you on the trail? From 10 a.m.-noon June 25, adults and kids ages eight and older can learn Lost Proofing at Pajarito Environmental Education Center, from 10 a.m. to noon. Led by Rob Dixon, the class will teach skills one will need to know if they are ever lost in the woods.
    The class will discuss what to do if you realize you are lost. It will also give tips and advice about how not to get lost in the first place and it will help answer questions such as, “how would you spend the night in woods with no tent?”
    Dixon has led classes, workshops and demonstrations for many schools and groups.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    All of our fully reconditioned adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are microchipped — a bargain in anyone’s book, all at one low price.
    We get lots of roaming cats and dogs. Don’t assume your cat was a meal for a coyote or that your dog fell victim to something even scarier. This applies especially to animals missing in White Rock. Check with the shelter and see if your best friend is bunking with us. And remember, when you come to claim your friend, you must have proof of rabies vaccination.
    Cats

  • Are you curious about the medicinal and herbal plants that grow wild on the Pajarito Plateau? Kristi Beguin will lead a walk around several sites in Los Alamos to find wild edible and medicinal herbs at 9:30 a.m. June 26. Participants will learn to recognize the herbs and how to use them. The class will last until 1:30 p.m. and will cost $30 or $24 for Pajarito Environmental Education Center members.  

  • The next meeting of the Los Alamos Geological Society will be 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Christian Church, 92 East Road.
    Dan Aiken, retired from Freeport-McMoran Copper and Gold, Inc., will present a talk entitled, “The Way to Antarctica: Land and Sea.”
    It is not easy getting to Antarctica. It takes luck, commitment, timing, money, seasick medication and some good garments, plus an exceptional guidebook to remote places.
    Equipped with all of the above, plus a healthy fear of Drake’s Passage and the experience of being left behind on pack ice, Aiken  journeyed south from Brazil, where he was living. This talk is about that journey and how the geology of Antarctica relates to the breakup of Gondwana.

  • The perfect pair is at it again and will be  at it all summer long. Liz Martineau and Gordon McDonough of the Bradbury Science Museum will once again elevate science in the minds and hearts of community youth.
    This year the team includes a host of fellow collaborators to assist on the lifelong learning path. Their friends at Pajarito Environmental Education Center, Los Alamos Historical Museum, Bandelier National Monument, Fuller Lodge Art Center, the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and Assets In Action have come together to sponsor free events, open to the community, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays.

  • The MG Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of the Military Order of World Wars in Los Alamos announces that Chris Ortega, senior weaver of the Chimayó Ortega weaving family will be the guest speaker at the June dinner meeting at 6 p.m. June 21 at the Best Western Hilltop House Hotel.
    Ortega will talk about the Ortega weaving family. He is retired from the Los Alamos County Utilities department, where he was the utilities department manager. Ortega is currently chairman of the Los Alamos County Utilities Board.

  • Nine dancers from the New Mexico Dance Theater and five dancers from the School of the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet will take part in a two-week tour of France this summer.
    “This is extremely exciting,” said NMDT director Susan Baker-Dillingham, “and we are so lucky to have Jefferson Baum directing the tour.”
    Baum, a member of the ASFB faculty, who joined the NMDT faculty last year after teaching at the NMDT Summer Dance Intensive, has been impressed enough to put a collaborative tour together featuring students from both schools.
    “Jefferson has taken groups of pre-professional dancers to France in the past and I am elated he feels the NMDT dancers are ready for such a challenge,” Baker-Dillingham said.

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, June 17, 2011
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – LIVE!
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting (Replay 6-07-11)
    03:00 PM Start up Ceremony of the MW Turbine
        at the Abiquiu Hydroelctric Facility
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society-“World War II: One Soldier’s Story”
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Pure Mind
    09:00 PM UCTV

    Saturday, June 18, 2011
    5:00 UCTV

    Sunday, June 19, 2011
    06:00 AM UCTV

  • The Los Alamos Community Winds has joined a consortium of 15 community bands from across the country to commission a new wind ensemble piece, “Fantasia on Silent Night,” by award-winning composer James Syler.
    “I have wanted to do something like this for awhile — playing with the ‘Silent Night’ tune. I’ve already started to work on it,” Syler said. “It’s odd to work on a Christmas carol in the middle of summer.”
    The name of each commissioning ensemble and their directors will be printed on the score. The score and parts will be turned in on Oct. 1.

  • In July and August, global opera star Mark Steven Doss will once again portray Mephistopheles when he takes the stage for the Santa Fe Opera’s first-ever production of “Faust.”
    Reprising Charles
    Gounod’s demonic villain for his seventh production, which will bring his career performances to 40, it is a role that he continues to savor.
    “Mephistopheles is a physically demanding role, which requires me to be on stage throughout most of the production, and I enjoy it immensely,” said Doss, who is a Grammy Award winning bass-baritone and former Santa Fe Opera apprentice. “I continue to build on each of my previous performances to further reveal the power and pain of the fallen angel.”

  • ALBUQUERQUE — “The Case of the Indian Trader” (University of New Mexico Press) is the story of Billy Gene Malone and the end of an era.
    Malone lived almost his entire life on the Navajo Reservation working as an Indian trader; the last real Indian trader to operate historic Hubbell Trading Post.
    While Malone is at the center of this story, a more complex picture unfolds in federal agent Paul Berkowitz’s detailed account of how the National Park Service launched — and recklessly pursued — an investigation targeting Malone, falsely accusing him of a host of crimes. In 2005, Berkowitz was assigned to take over the year-and-a-half-old case.

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society is hosting a book signing and author talk with Robert J. Torrez and Robert Trapp, co-authors of Rio Arriba: A New Mexico County, on Tuesday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. The book signing is in conjunction with Homestead Day, part of the Summer Adventures in History and Science sponsored every Tuesday in June and July by the Los Alamos Historical Society and Bradbury Science Museum.
    Rio Arriba: A New Mexico County reviews the history of the area. The authors provide  an overview of its primordial beginnings, the Tewa peoples that established the county’s first permanent settlements, the role the Navajo, Ute, and Jicarilla Apache played in the region’s history.

  • Each year families anticipate The Santa Fe Opera’s popular Youth Nights at the Opera, a special program that allows them to attend final dress rehearsals at greatly reduced prices.  
    Since its inception in 1959, Youth Nights at the Opera have provided an opportunity for over 225,000 children and young adults to see professionally staged opera performances.  General Director Charles MacKay attributes his love of opera to his attendance at the very first Youth Night performance of “Die Fledermaus,” in 1959.

  • It’s a rare occasion when two theatres can come together to coordinate a show to bring to Los Alamos. It is even more rare when an actor from Albuquerque brings a show to Los Alamos,  which he plans to tour the country with, hoping to eventually end up on Broadway. Jim Cady of the Adobe Theater in Albuquerque has that goal for “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill.” Performances at the Los Alamos Little Theatre are a step toward helping him further realize that goal.
    “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill” just finished a run at Warehouse 21 in Santa Fe. There were two performances, both of which resulted in thunderous applause and standing ovations.

  •     Greg Abate, considered one of the top saxophonists in the world, will play bebop jazz at 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond as part of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.
    After graduating from the Berklee College of Music in the mid 70s, he started his own ensemble called “Channel One,” but soon quit to play lead alto sax for the Ray Charles Orchestra.
    He stayed on with the orchestra for a couple of years then went back to his own band and sound, and then joined the Artie Shaw Orchestra, where he played tenor sax.
    However, he ran into problems with both bands because he was unable to improvise. The bands were too structured and Abate considered himself a very cool jazz musician.