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Features

  • The American Legion Post 90 in Los Alamos hosted a dinner Sept. 30 for the participants of the American Legion Boys State/Girls State program earlier this year at Eastern New Mexico University in Portales.  The invitees included the families of the participants and the local sponsors of the event. County Council Chair Sharon Stover and Los Alamos Public Schools Superintendent Gene Schmidt also attended.
    The Boys State participants included Conlan McCoy, Benjamin Mitsunaga, Kyle Partin, Cory Geyer and Aaron Roybal. The Girls State participant was Amanda Milligan. Beta Sigma Phi City Council, BPOE 2083 Elks Lodge of Los Alamos, Zia Credit Union and The Los Alamos Kiwanis Club were sponsors.
    Back row, left to right, Vernon Kerr, chairman Boys State Los Alamos; William J. cooper, commander Post 90; Shaughnessy Nadeau, Unit 90 president; Marie Todd, chairwoman Girls State Los Alamos.
    Front row, left to right, Aaron Roybal, Kyle Partin, Cory Geyer, Conlon McCoy, Benjamin Mitsunaga. Not pictured: Girls State participant Amanda Milligan.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Elk’s Lodge, 1600 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Sept. 9, complaint
    Violations: None
    Notes: Meat was brought from Matthew’s Meat Processor on Friday, left at 4 p.m. The pig was butchered and when they picked it up, they had a large metal tub. They placed a tarp inside, placed bags of ice and them placed the pig on the ice, then placed bags of ice on top of the pig. Covered with tarp. When they picked up the pig, it didn’t appear to be cool to the touch. They transported it to Los Alamos, which took approximately 13/4 to two hours. They immediately brought in the pig and began cutting up, unwrapped it and placed it in the refrigerator. Portion by portion got cooked. During cooling, they cooked for an hour at 160 degrees. The servings of food were picked up by some firefighters and taken back to the station. Approximately 30 out of 37 got ill (diarrhea). All ate about 5-6 p.m. Most got ill by 4-5 a.m. USDA will be contacted to investigate Matthew’s Meat Processing in Belen. Elk’s Lodge has been doing this for some time. This has been done 23 other times (approximately 20 years).

    Hot Rocks Java catering, 4200 W. Jemez Road
    Date inspected: Sept. 28

  • The 12th annual PEECnic, Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s  yearly meeting for members and friends will be from 2-4 p.m. Oct. 14.
    There will be activities, talks, and cider filling the air at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    PEEC traditionally holds its annual meeting in the fall, when Bandelier’s Park Flight ornithologist interns are still in town, so that attendees can learn about birds found across the Americas.  
    The PEECnic features illustrated talks by the interns, kids’ activities and light refreshments.
    This year, kids will be making a scarecrow to enter in the MainStreet scarecrow contest and there will be a cider press with plenty of apples to turn into juice.   
    Finally, PEEC members will vote on the board of directors for the coming year.
    As a special thank you to the community for encouraging county council to vote for a new nature center for Los Alamos, there will be a slideshow of PEEC’s history.  
    Council received hundreds of letters and emails from community members in support of the nature center.   
    The PEECnic is free and open to all, whether or not they are PEEC members.  
    For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • Come to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 7 p.m. Oct. 10 to hear about the Biological Resource Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Chuck Hathcock will talk about the lab’s compliance with environmental laws and the plan to protect sensitive species found on lab property.
    The biological resource management teams at LANL assess the status of a variety of organisms on LANL property, including some with threatened or endangered statuses.  
    The team then reports back about how to best manage the biological resources involved.  They have surveyed many different species, including the Jemez Mountain salamander, Rio Grande chub and numerous bird and bat species. LANL scientists often call upon the biology division at the lab to give advice on proposed plans that may pose a threat to the local flora and fauna.
    Hathcock is a wildlife biologist at LANL with more than 15 years of experience in the field. Hathcock and his colleagues have documented many important reports on the biology found in and around LANL.
    His research focuses primarily on songbird population demographics. Outside of work, Hathcock is an avid naturalist and hiker and can be found most weekends birding, bird banding or traveling.  

  • Paul Bauer presents a geo-photo-journey down the northern Rio Grande, emphasizing the river hydrogeology and the evolution of the sublime landscape, during his presentation, “Down the Rio Grande: A Paddler’s Perspective of Rocks and Rapids,” at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 9 at Fuller Lodge.
    The talk is part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2012-2013 lecture series, “History and Science.”
    Bauer shares his thoughts on the birth and adolescence of the river, where it gets its water and its system of springs.
    He explores the geologic setting of rapids along the river, the Tertiary battles between water and lava, and tidbits of riverside human history as diverse as gold mining and astronaut training.
    Bauer is a principal geologist and associate director at the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources at New Mexico Tech.
    He received a doctorate in geology from New Mexico Tech in 1988.
    He served as manager of the state’s Geologic Mapping Program for 12 years, and was program coordinator for the New Mexico Decision-Makers Field Conferences for 10 years, a program designed to bridge the gap between earth scientists and policy makers.  
    He has spent much of the last 30 years investigating the geology and hydrogeology of north-central New Mexico.

  • When the phrase “Needles and Pins” is muttered, it sometimes brings to mind the old saying about waiting on needles and pins. It also can bring to mind the Ramones punk rock song of the same name. But on Friday, it will also be associated with art.
    “Needles and Pins” opens with a reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday. The exhibit is part of the Arts Crawl, which will include events at Mesa Public Library, the Los Alamos Historical Museum and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    Artists’ interpretations of a subject are as varied as the pieces they create. This show challenged artists to think outside the box and present their views of needles and pins. The results might be surprising.
    In a state well known for fibers arts and artists, it shouldn’t be surprising that there were myriad entries. However, the show is about more than creating clothing and quilts  — though there are some pieces included. Everything from a pin dome by Los Alamos artist Darla Graff, to  K.C. Coe’s “Ashley Pond Basket” will be on display.

  • Franz Schubert, according to Biography.com, only had one public concert in his life. But thanks to Juanita Madland, Claudia Hilko, Susan Mendel and Alicia Solomon, he will be given a second.
    The group of musicians will host a benefit concert to the Los Alamos Arts Council at 4 p.m. Sunday at Fuller Lodge. The concert is a tribute to the composer and is titled, “Schubertiad.”
    Despite the fact that Schubert died in 1828, his music and the era he lived in will come to life during the concert. To accomplish this, the performers will wear period dresses to portray an actual Schubert Party, will perform as though Schubert was present and will transport the audience back in time to 1797-1828.
    Schubert’s life was short, but he wrote 1,200 pieces in his life of 31 years. Weekly, his friends gathered with him to play the music he wrote during that week. Schubert hardly ever performed as he was so busy churning out music.
    He said, “I wake up, I work on a composition until I am through with it, then I start another. That is what I do all day.”
    “His ‘spirit’ will be with us as we converse with him about his singing Lieder and piano compositions,” Madland said. This is the first of three Schubertiads. The audience is invited to talk with the performers over refreshments.

  • The Los Alamos High School NJROTC Unarmed Drill team opened up the season this year by taking third place at the Early Bird Invitational last week at Valley High School in Albuquerque. Eighteen schools competed at this event from across the state and included JROTC units from every military branch.
    The Los Alamos High School team consisted of nine girls including cadets: Rachel Barthell, Kayla Benson, Karina Bequet-Stidham, Casandra Brewer-Houlton, Tristan Graham, Victoria Hypes, Gianna Maggiore, Mikyla Smith and Jodi Thomas. Analicia Ronquillo, whose command voice earned the title “Best Unarmed Commander” in the Commanders Cup division, commanded the nine girls. The armed team and three color guards finished with an average of fourth place, with the unit as whole finishing third. The next test for all of the teams takes place  Oct. 26 and 27, when they travel to the New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell.

  • Recurring meetings

     

    The Atomic City Corvette Club meets at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Time Out Pizza in White Rock. For more information, contact Chris Ortega at 672-9789.

     

    The Lions Club meets at 84 Barcelona in White Rock on the first and third Thursdays. For more information, call 672-3300 or 672-9563.

     

  • Wednesday

    The Los Alamos Arts Council presents Brave New Brass, a new ensemble, based on brass quintets organized by Dave and Deneice Korzekwa. The Brown Bag event will be at noon at Fuller Lodge.

     

    Girls in grade K-12, who are interested in Girl Scouts are invited to an information session and registration event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum. For more information, email su22@losalamos@gmail.com. 

     

  • Public Access Channel 8 will present “Democracy Now!” host Amy Goodman with co-author of “The Silenced Majority,” Denis Moynihan, Oct. 11 at Fuller Lodge. 

    Award-winning journalist Amy Goodman, anchor of the daily, grassroots, global, radio/TV news hour “Democracy Now!” is on a two-month, 100 city tour holding public events to help raise funds for the public broadcasters that carry “Democracy Now!”  

    She will give a public talk from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Otowi Station Bookstore will host a book signing of  “The Silenced Majority,” following the event at Fuller Lodge. 

    The price of the book is not included in luncheon cost. 

  • Welcome to October and the asset category of support.

    This category encompasses assets one through six and includes: family support, positive family communication, other adult relationships, caring neighborhood, caring school climate and parent involvement in schooling.

    Our first two areas of focus are numbers one and two, family support and positive family communication.

    I would like to draw attention to adult responsibility when it comes to being supportive and having positive communication with youth.

    Do you reap what you sow? I know several adults who don’t hesitate to bash their children on social media and to friends, even when kids are within earshot.

  • Italian music will fill the Hilltop House Hotel, when Assets In Action hosts “A Night in Italy.”
    Local Chef Jarda Belmonte of Tasty Creations by Jarda, will stir, sauce and sauté her way through the kitchen to benefit the local program of youth and community development.
    “After raising three daughters, I believe you can never do enough to help them along their way,” Belmonte said when asked why she decided to help the local program.
    The Hilltop House Hotel, also home of AIA’s Community Asset Awards, was ready and willing to work with the fundraising team to make it happen.
    After a scheduling bump, the event has been slated for Oct. 20, with cocktail hour from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and dinner starting at 6:30 p.m.
    The multi-faceted menu will be a buffet, just like mama use to make, as Belmonte delivers various dishes of comfort food meant to stir the soul, while invoking memories or perhaps future trips to Italy.
     “Cooking is like therapy for me,” Belmonte said. “I am relaxed and comfortable when I am cooking.”
    Guests will find themselves in an Italian intervention as Belmonte prepares ensalada caprese, braciole, mussels in marinara, chicken marsala, Italian-style pork roast and various pastas. The meal will include wine and dessert for $40 a person.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    DOGS
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.
    Four Border Collie puppies (Desmond, Bones, Reggie and Romper) — Four-months-old, all males. They are pretty shy and the volunteers are working on socialization. Keep watching as they develop into fun, approachable pups.
    Houdini — Not a magician, but rather an adorable black-and-white Spaniel/Border Collie-mix. He recently got a bath and is ready to show off his lovely, clean coat. He is affectionate and sweet with both dogs and people and would love to accompany his new person everywhere.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Española

    Española Headstart, 340 N. Railroad Ave.
    Date inspected: Sept. 20
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Española Hospital, 1010 Spruce St.
    Date inspected: Sept. 19
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Española Senior Citizens Center and catering, 410 Hunter St.
    Date inspected: Sept. 20
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — scoop inside, contaminating the salt. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    ETS Fairview Elementary, 1000 Zuni Lane
    Date inspected: Sept. 21
    Violations: One high-risk violation for plumbing/waste disposal — two-compartment sink drain needs immediate repair. Drain broken, issued major notice of violation.
    Note: All staff were observed wearing gloves, hair nets/restraints and clean uniforms.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    James Rodriguez Elementary, 333 Coronado St.
    Date inspected: Sept. 20

  • On a lazy afternoon, the last thing many people want to do is head to Santa Fe to look at galleries. The mention of the word can be enough to make some people look around for undone chores.
    However, Hillside Market, at 86 Old Las Vegas Hwy., has a range of services that might change some minds. With work from more than 30 New Mexican artists, antiques, a koi rescue area, a coffee shop and a large greenhouse, Hillside Market is appealing to people of all ages.
    Owners Tisha Sjostrand, Kate Sjostrand and Pam Fennell created a space for people to browse, have a cup of coffee, meet local artists, buy local produce and take a class or two. This is no high-pressure sales situation. Staff members and artists are available to give information, but customers can enjoy the items on display at their own pace, without being pushed or prodded, which is helpful, as there is so much to see.
    The variety of merchandise includes items one expects to see in art galleries, such as paintings and sculptures, but also includes jewelry, rugs, furniture and many old treasures. Another important facet of this business is that the artists are not from elsewhere, merely selling their work in New Mexico, so all purchases support New Mexico’s economy.

  • On Oct. 5, four different organizations will keep their doors open into the evening to provide an inside view of the arts community.
    Mesa Public Library Art Gallery at 2400 Central Ave. celebrates the opening of “Unmute,” a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, from 4-5:30 p.m.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books, but also other works in a wide range of media.
    “Unmute”  is an exhibition of works on paper from the permanent collection of the University Art Gallery at New Mexico State University that question the assumptions about the relationship of language and image in visual art.
    It explores in depth what happens when artists indulge the fundamental impulse to breach the supposed boundaries between the verbal and the visual.
    Also from 4-5:30 p.m., the Los Alamos Historical Society,1050 Bathtub Row, will feature photographs of Manhattan Project veteran Jack Aeby, who took the only known color photo of the world’s first atomic blast at Trinity Site. Their permanent exhibits feature all eras of Los Alamos history, including a section on post-war “Cold War” era Pacific testing, a domestic bomb shelter and more.

  • Mesa Public Library Art Gallery, with support from the Friends of Los Alamos County Libraries, will host a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, including the closest form of that relationship, the artist’s book.
    The event is from 4-5:30 p.m. Oct. 5 and is part of the Arts Crawl Evening, which includes the Los Alamos Historical Museum, Fuller Lodge Art Center and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books but also other works in a wide range of media as well. Works by 52 artists, many of world renown, provide a strong showing of how text and image combine to make visually and intellectually compelling art. Sol Lewitt, Joyce Kozloff, Hans Haacke, Melissa Grimes, Jaune Quick to See Smith, Pat Steir, Carrie Mae Weems, to name a few, are among those artists whose work is included in the exhibit, one so fitting to be shown in a library. New Mexico institutions have treasures in their collections, a resource to share across the state and across institutional venues for all New Mexicans and visitors to enjoy.

  • Aiyeswaria Jeganathan was the 2012 Chalk Walk grand prize winner. The Chalk Walk is held annually in front of Fuller Lodge, as part of the Next Big Idea Festival

  • The students of the Los Alamos High School Naval Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps would like the community to assist their program by not just opening their wallets, but your mouths.
    The monthly Barbecue Brisket Night kicks off Thursday, remaining a steadfast fundraiser for more than three years.
    The menu will include barbecue brisket, a vegetable, potato, roll and dessert for $10 and will be served at the Sheriff’s Posse Lodge, from 5:30-7 p.m.
    LAHS Booster Club President Brenda Kelley explains how the fundraising opportunities throughout the community will help teams with their participation at competition.
    “This allows the instructors to concentrate on core instruction and training they provide to the cadets,” Kelley said. “The value gained by the additional activities can be measured by the many trophies, awards, ribbons and other formal recognition but the biggest and best prize is the positive experiences provide to the cadets.”
    The training and experience offered through the programs provides students with hands-on opportunities from serving others to achieving personal goals that fill lifetime learning experiences.
    For more information about the program, call 663-3227.