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Features

  • Representatives of Self Help, Inc., Walter Barkley, Joyce Nickols (coordinator of the Children’s Tools for School Project), and Ellen Morris Bond, receive a check from the Los Alamos Masons to purchase Xerox/copy paper for Los Alamos and Northern New Mexico schools. Rick Garland, of the Masons, presented the check.

  • The MG Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of the Military Order of World Wars in Los Alamos announces Katy Korkos of the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce will present a talk on the recent visit to Sarov, Russia by a Los Alamos Development Corporation, Community Development Team.
    The meeting will be  at 6:25 p.m. Tuesday at the Best Western Hilltop House, third floor. It will begin with a short social period and business meeting, followed by dinner and speaker. Korkos’ talk begins at 7:15 p.m.
    The dinner entrée is lasagna, vegetables and salad. The cost of the dinner is $20 per person.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to the general public for the dinner and program, or the program only, at no cost.

  • The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos has been awarded a $337,725 three-year grant from the National Science Foundation for a proposal to “Reinvigorate Information Technology Education with Cyber Security.” Dean of Instruction Dr. Kate Massengale wrote the grant. Dr. Lynne Williams, who has a doctorate in cyber security, is the principal investigator.
    The New Mexico Consortium helped Massengale initiate this effort by providing training in grant writing. Michelle Hall, a professor and grant writer, who now works at NSF, gave the training. Hall is also the creator of the regional Café Scientifique, which exposes teens to science and technology in innovative ways to attract them to these fields.  

  • Enriqueta Gonzales was recently awarded New Mexico Health Care Association’s Best of the Best Resident Support Award for 2011.  She is an employee at Aspen Ridge Lodge.
    The Resident Support award is a board category that covers all of those staff members outside of direct care who work hard for the residents. They make contributions to the comfort and safety of the residents, yet they may be rarely seen. The housekeeping, dietary, laundry and maintenance staff are often ‘invisible,’ yet they can make or break the living experience of residents, according to a NMHCA press release.

  • Los Alamos Light Orchestra presents, “Into the Woods” a musical written by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine. It showcases half a dozen Grimms’ fairytales, to include the classic, “Jack and the Beanstalk,” which is intertwined with an original story about a childless baker and his wife.
    Once upon a time, in a far off kingdom, there lived a sad young lad whose name was Jack. Jack lived with his mother in a house that was rapidly falling apart and to Jack’s mother’s dismay, her son would rather daydream than help her with everyday tasks.

  • The letters “MD” after a name can denote “medical doctor” or “musical director.”  In the case of Ivan Shulman, these letters denote both, what he describes as a natural combination.
    Shulman, the conductor of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s Oct. 21  Fall Concert, grew up studying oboe under the tutelage of his father, oboist Harry Shulman, who played in the NBC Orchestra under Arturo Toscanini.
    In college he studied pre-med and went on to medical school at the University of Pittsburgh, with a general surgery residency in New York, Seattle and San Francisco.
    While keeping a busy medical career, Shulman always sought out opportunities to play in both community and professional groups.

  • Get a jumpstart on Halloween at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center. The center will host a Halloween carnival and pumpkin splash on Oct. 23. Participants will have the opportunity to hunt for their favorite pumpkin in the pool and then get to decorate it, all while enjoying festive treats and playing carnival games throughout the building.
    The cost is $7 per pumpkin splasher, and admission includes participation in all carnival games, as well as one pumpkin and one decorating kit. All ages are welcome. Maximum participation is 150 people. Advanced tickets are being sold at the Aquatic Center.

  • Dates announced

    The Betty Ehart Senior center has announced the dates for the Festival of Chocolate and the Festival of Trees.
    The fundraisers will benefit programs for youth and seniors in 2011 and 2012.
    The Festival of Chocolate will be  from 7-9 p.m. Nov. 12, with tickets available for $20, starting at the end of October.
    The Festival of Chocolate formally launches the Festival of Trees which hosts their event from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 19.
    Admission is free, but collections of non-perishable items are taken to benefit programs.
    To donate a chocolate dessert or a holiday tree for auction call 672-4089 for more information.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Española

    McDonald’s, 618 N. Riverside Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 11, complaint
    Reason for complaint: Someone complained about menudo being sold during the weekend.
    Action: Called Vangie Martinez to inquire about complaint. Upon speaking with her, she asked her workers and they were having a potluck — personal use of menudo lunch. No menudo was sold, given to public and menudo was kept out of the contact of other foods as per manager. Complaint closed out.

    Santa Fe

    Adobe Abode, 202 Chapelle St.
    Date inspected: Oct. 6

  • “This concerto is one of the greatest pieces in clarinet repertoire — one of the prime jewels in literature.  I am delighted to be playing it.”  Dr. Robert Marcus used these words to describe “Mozart’s Concerto For Clarinet, K 622 (1791),” which he will perform with the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra at 7 p.m. Oct. 21 at the Crossroads Bible Church.
    Marcus is a retired physician from the department of Medicine at Stanford University, now living in Santa Fe. He has had an active musical life, performing in symphony and chamber groups, while also maintaining a busy medical career. In 1995 he performed the “Mozart Clarinet Concerto” with the Redwood Symphony in California.

  • For the seventh year, Los Alamos will get a sampling of Indian culture, as Dances of India entertains residents with its free performance at the Duane Smith Auditorium.
    This year, the group headed by dance instructors Kavita Nandakishore and Alina Deshpande, will showcase their skills as they offer up their own version of the classic tale, “Snow White.” The event will be from 4-6 p.m. Saturday.

  • Autumn is swiftly settling upon our enchanted land. The amount of daylight diminishes with each passing day as the Aspen leaves reveal the first signs of their golden transformation.  
    The first leg of the journey traveled the passes of N.M. 4 through Jemez Springs, proceeding west on N.M. 485 to Gilman Tunnels. The next leg of the journey, from Gilman Tunnels to Porter Landing, offers many opportunities to enjoy unique scenery and history, while soaking in the changing fall colors.

    Beyond Gilman Tunnels

     Shortly past the tunnels, the road switches from paved to gravel where it becomes Forest Road 376. The continuing road loosely follows an old railroad spur leading to Porter Landing.   

  • When thinking of New Mexico, few Americans think about spy vs. spy intrigue, but in fact, to many international intelligence operatives, the state’s name is nearly synonymous with espionage, and Santa Fe is a sacred site.
    The KGB’s single greatest intelligence and counterintelligence coups and the planning of the organization’s most infamous assassination, all took place within one mile of Bishop Lamy’s statue in front of the St. Francis Cathedral in downtown Santa Fe.
    In his book, “A Spy’s Guide to Santa Fe and Albuquerque,” former CIA agent E. B. Held uses declassified documents from both the CIA and KGB, as well as secondary sources, to trace some of the most notorious spying events in U.S. history.

  • I write this column with a very heavy heart this week. On Sunday, I learned that Search Institute leader Dr. Peter Benson passed away after a battle with colon cancer.
    Benson was essentially the leader of the band, but feel free to insert the description of your choice: the front man, choir director, chairman of the board, or the coach.
    The “coach” is probably the best description because he is known for saying, “If you’re breathing, you’re on the team.”
    I had seen Benson numerous times at asset conferences in Minnesota, New York and Ohio. After one particular conference where we spent a lot of time talking about sparks, I decided to write him a letter.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Be sure to click on the Friends of the Shelter website, www.lafos.org. You can volunteer and/or donate, as well as check out links to all our adoptable pals.
    We have a new color-coding system to help you select your perfect new family member. Check it out.
    The shelter has just received a new group of cats and has appointments for their veterinary updates. They are available for viewing and will be adoptable very soon. Come visit Michael and C-2.

    Cats

  • Because of cuts, there is not enough money in the budget to fill the Los Alamos Middle School Library with the books their students and teachers need for reading and research, therefore, they are asking for monetary donations, which will be used to purchase the library materials needed.
    For every $15 donated, staff can purchase a new book for the library, ready to be checked out. One hundred percent of all donations go to the library and can be made by visiting www.funds4books.com and enter school code 80ca. Donations must be made by Oct. 17.

  • Of all the plays about insanity that have been produced over the years, Dale Wasserman’s 1963 Broadway play, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” is probably the most well-known. Adapted from Ken Kesey’s novel of the same title, published in 1962, Wasserman’s movie won five Academy Awards. But Kesey and Wasserman weren’t the only ones to tackle the topic.

  • Drivers needed

    Los Alamos Lions Club provides services to the community. One activity is the HELP program, which started 30 years ago. The program provides free transportation for medical treatment and appointments outside the county. Patients are transported to Española, Santa Fe and Albuquerque. There are 30 drivers, but more are always needed. today.  If you would like to be a volunteer driver call Barbara Croley at 672-3618 or Lee Sullivan at 661-8037.

    Be a volunteer

  • Guest Conductor, Dr. William Carson, director of bands at Coe College, will present a new performing edition of Percy Grainger’s “Spoon River” during the Los Alamos Community Winds performance at 7 p.m. Oct. 15 at Crossroads Bible Church.
    “Spoon River” for concert band wasn’t published during Grainger’s lifetime, but in 1993 Carson found a manuscript in Percy Grainger’s handwriting, in the Music Building of Coe College.
    “That inspired me to find out what they were. If they were the band parts that Grainger intended for ‘Spoon River,’ then that is really exciting and people are going to want to play it,” Carson said.

  • Michelle Pauline Boerigter was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for September. Michelle is the daughter of Kathleen and Stephen Boerigter and sister of Rebecca and Kim Boerigter.
    The  of Los Alamos selects one student from the current Los Alamos High School graduating class to honor each month of the school year.  Students are selected on the basis of their academics, extracurricular activities and their service to the community.