.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Lisa Bravo is the Director of Education and Training for the Children’s Success Foundation and Psychotherapist, that has been teaching and writing about the Nurtured Heart Approach for 10 years.
    The Nurtured Heart Approach, according to Bravo, was developed by her colleague, Howard Glasser, in the 1990s.
    “It began as a therapeutic approach for addressing the behavioral needs of children DX with ADD, ADHD and a host of other behaviorally based components,” Bravo said.
    On Monday, many LAPS staff, from the middle and high school, will spend a day of professional development learning the approach and the ease of implementation for the classroom.
    “I specialize in working with difficult teens in my practice and I can assure you that what they need the most from us is relationship and connection,” said Bravo. “This training will address the emotional needs of these young adults and how to foster emotional competency.”
    Bravo was excited to see the LAPS district focus on the upper-grade levels, when many communities tend to just focus on elementary-aged students.
    When the Los Alamos Juvenile Justice Advisory Board identified a gap that needed to be filled, they stepped in to help.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.
    Los Alamos
    Lee’s Chinese Buffet, 124 Longview
    Date inspected: April 1
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Inspection issued after complaint. No follow up required.

    China Palace, 759 Central Ave.
    Date inspected: April 1
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Inspection issued after complaint. No follow up required.

    North Road Inn, 2127 North Road
    Date inspected: April 2
    Violations: One low risk violation for chemical exposure.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.
    Santa Fe
    Cleopatra Cafe, 3462 Zafarano Road
    Date Inspected: March 27
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Evangelo’s, 200 W. San Francisco St.
    Date Inspected: March 27
    Violations: One moderate risk violation for contaminated equipment.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

  • Great Conversations is an afternoon of delicious appetizers and desserts and an in-depth conversation with a subject area expert. This is the 4th Annual Great Conversations hosted by the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation. It will take place on April 28 from 2-5 p.m. at Los Alamos High School in the new building. This is the third in a series about the conversations that will take place.

    Reading into the Change in Books: Kindle, Nook & iPad
    Steven Thomas
    How is the nature of the publishing industry being fundamentally altered? Steven Thomas, the Los Alamos County Library Chief Administrator, will guide a conversation on the effects of technology on libraries, publishers, and most importantly, readers.
    This conversation will delve into the future of the book as the center of education and learning. Change is inevitable, but how will technology share the future of libraries? What do experts studying current industry trends think will happen next?
    Thomas has served as a library manager/administrator in systems including the Brooklyn, New York Public Library, the Fayetteville Arkansas Public Library, the Kanawha County West Virginia Library System, and the Washington County Arkansas Library System.
    He and his wife, Lisa Caldwell, recently re-located to Los Alamos and they love it here!

  • At the April meeting of the Los Alamos Mountaineers, Tim Goering and Dave Colbert will give a slideshow about a mountain biking trip to China and Tibet in 1986, while they were students at the University of Arizona.
    They decided to take a semester off from school to bike across China and Tibet to Nepal, riding across Inner Mongolia, northern and central China, and from Lanzhou across Qinghai province and Tibet.
    Tim and Dave spent some time in Lhasa, stocking supplies and recovering from a nasty bout of giardia picked up earlier on the trip, and finished their trip riding from Shigatze over a 19,000 ft pass across the Himalayas down to Kathmandu.
    They rode about 3000 kilometers in all, crossing China at a time when it was just starting to open up to foreigners.
    The trip was not approved or sanctioned by the Chinese government (although they tried honestly to get official permission), and the United States Embassy strongly discouraged the trip, once they got word of our plans.
    But regardless, being young and foolish, they were determined, and early one morning they disappeared on a train headed north for (Inner) Mongolia to start the trip.
    Most of the places they rode in China, and all of Tibet except Lhasa and Shigatze, were completely closed off to foreigners, which made the trip even more interesting.

  • Looking for a fun-filled afternoon for the entire family? Seek no more. On the first Friday of every month, the Pajarito Environmental Educational Center hosts Friday Forts. It is an opportunity for kids and their parents to play, build and enjoy the outdoors.
    Executive Director Katie Watson started the program over a year ago and it has gotten a positive response from parents and children in the Los Alamos area. “It is a great bonding moment for them,” she said.
    Earlier this year, first, second and third grade students from different schools in the area had come for field trips. “I think the most kids we have had here at one time was 18,” Watson said.
    The public is welcome to attend anytime, but it is strongly recommended that parents stay present with their children while they play, due to the outdoor, open area of the dirt pile and the surrounding ravine.
    Steve Niezgoda and his son Emory, 4, took advantage of the spring day on last week. The two spent some time build a fort out of tree trunks and sticks strewed throughout the dirt pile.

  • Born out of humble beginnings, the Gathering of Nations, the world’s largest gathering of Native American and indigenous people, will celebrate its 30th anniversary in Albuquerque between April 25 and 27.
    Considered the most prominent powwow in North America, it will host tens of thousands of people and more than 700 tribes from throughout the United States, Canada and around the world honoring three decades of Native American culture and traditions through dance, music, food and indigenous dress.
    The three-day event includes more than 3,000 traditional Native American singers and dancers competing and entertaining a capacity crowd, and more than 800 Native American artisans, craftsmen and traders displaying and selling their work.
    In addition, dozens of different indigenous bands will perform various musical genres on Stage 49, and vendors will offer a wide variety of food in the Native America Food Court and Powwow Alley.
    As part of the Gathering of Nations, a young Native American woman is crowned Miss Indian World and represents all native and indigenous people as a cultural goodwill ambassador.

  • Posse Lodge hosts a fundraising concert Friday featuring Los Alamos roots-rock band, DK & the Affordables. The band and some friends are donating their time and all money will go toward the series.
    The band members are DK Warner on guitar and lead vocals, Rob Heineman on bass and vocals, Aaron Anderson on keyboards and Quinn Marksteiner on saxophone. Drummer Scott Beguin can’t make the show, but Santa Fe’s Jeff Sussman will replace him.
    Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. Appetizers are being donated by Susan Brockway, Andrea Pistone, Kimber Heineman, Kim Lazarus and DK & Jocelyn Warner.
    The Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series is set to begin May 17. Nineteen concerts are planned for this series. For specific information on this and future concerts, visit gordonsummerconcerts.com.  

  • The public is invited to the Breast Cancer: The Numbers That Really Matter and Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome Seminar sponsored by the Los Alamos Council on Cancer and celebrate, learn and inspire. The free community program will be on Thursday. Dr. Eric Bernstein, oncologist with the Northern New Mexico Cancer Care at Los Alamos Medical Center and Dr. Kathryn Zerbach, with Los Alamos Surgical Associates will be presenting. The program will be held, 5:15 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 2200 Diamond Drive, with a light supper followed at 6 p.m. with the seminar.
    Dr. Eric Bernstein will present the basic epidemiology for patients with breast cancer. He will discuss the changes in breast cancer mortality relative to other cancers over time and what factors may influence the incidence and mortality in breast cancer. Absolute risk reduction will be explained, as well as the importance of this number in making treatment decisions. The relationship between pathologic findings and risk recurrence will be reviewed along with historical data. Dr. Bernstein will explain the differences in chemotherapy and hormone therapy and their role in risk reduction of breast cancer. Finally, he will discuss online tools such as Oncotype Dx and Adjuvant Online in making treatment decisions.

  • The Los Alamos MainStreet program is encouraging residents to take an
    online survey to help local businesses know what the wants and needs of the public are. The survey is available throughout April.
    All local residents can help the effort by taking the survey at lamainstreet.com/survey. The survey takes approximately 15 minutes to complete and responses are anonymous.
    There is an opportunity for those who complete the survey to enter a drawing for $100 in Chamber Checks in appreciation for their time.
    “We already have data at a high level about the levels of leakage in the various shopping categories,” says Business Advisor Katie Stavert.  “The results of this survey will supplement that with demographic breakdowns and preference information.” 
    Stavert is available to work with businesses on using the available data to better understand the market. 
    “I am hoping that people taking the survey will tell us about their preferences,” says Dave Fox of CB FOX. 
    For more information, contact Katie Stavert at 661-4805, katie@losalamos.org. 

  • One hundred and forty chess players gathered in Albuquerque March 30 for the 2013 New Mexico Elementary School State Chess Championships. Four State Champions were crowned – K-6 Individual, K-6 Team, K-3 Individual, K-3 Team; Aspen Elementary won the competition in each of these categories.
    The K-6 Aspen team of Victor Popa Simil, Henry Poston and Dimitri Lopez took first place, followed by TISA Charter School of Taos in second and Manzano Day School of Albuquerque in third.
    The K-3 Aspen team of Phillip Ionkov, Ming Lo, and Andy Corliss took first place, followed by the Albuquerque teams from SY Jackson Elementary and Double Eagle Elementary.
    For individual honors, there was a 3-way tie for state champion in the K-6 division – Victor Popa-Simil (Aspen), Henry Poston (Aspen) and Aaron Lawrence (Montessori of the Rio Grande, Albuquerque).
    Aspen Elementary swept the K-3 individual honors with Phillip Ionkov in first, Ming Lo in second and Andy Corliss in third. The Aspen team is now off to Nashville Tennessee in an attempt to defend their National Championship victory in the Blitz competition a year ago. 

  • Ahh Spring break, the time when many get an opportunity to take a break, a brief vacation, or just an opportunity to unwind.
    On Saturday, 45 youth and adults from the United Church of Los Alamos and the Unitarian Church, woke up bright and early to head to Mexico.
    This inter-congregational gathering isn’t for a vacation, but for the chance to work their behinds off.
    The team will build three homes in one week and change the lives of three families forever.
    The start of the trip wasn’t easy as the van nicknamed El Sol, broke down multiple times on the way to Arizona.
    After some very patient travelers arrived at the guest church, a team worked into the night to repair the alternator, before the border crossing the next day.
    Sunday the team crossed the border and set up a camp they would call home for the week. Here culinary caretakers prepared each meal with love.
    Monday was concrete day, as the team poured three home foundations of concrete all mixed by hand in a wheel barrow with a shovel and a lot of determination.
    Today is framing day, when walls take shape and depending on the concrete, may even be put into place.
    Wednesday the pieces go up, the roof goes on and then they will get have their first lunch in the shade, the shade of the home.

  •  

    April 7-13, 2013

    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

     

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY

    8:30, 10 a.m. Tax preparation

    8:45 a.m. Cardio

    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Orange chicken

  • Don’t forget about the Posse Shack Pancake Breakfast. All proceeds from this morning’s pancake breakfast will go towards Friends of the Shelter. Some of our current adoptable dogs will be there as well. 

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 505-662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home. Others are currently off-campus in loving foster homes.

    Be sure to visit the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out the Petfinder page for pictures and to learn more about all of the adoptable pets,
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html. All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are microchipped.

  • A great opportunity is available April 27 at the 2013 Los Alamos Dog Jog, a $20 reduced fee microchip clinic.
    Veterinarians from Animal Clinic of Los Alamos have donated their time and expertise to implant the microchips and Friends of the Shelter is very appreciative of their participation. 
    The fee includes the registration of the microchip to a database that can be read by shelters and veterinary clinics throughout the United States.
    No sign up is required ahead of time, just stop by Chamisa School in White Rock from 9-10:30 a.m. The clinic is open to the public, even if you aren’t registered for the Dog Jog.
     The best reason to have your animal microchipped is the improved chance that you’ll get your animal back if it becomes lost or stolen. Disasters where animals become displaced, you leave your pet with a sitter and the animal escapes, dogs that run away during thunderstorms or 4th of July fireworks, auto accidents, these are all times when your animal can become lost.
     A microchip is a small, electronic chip enclosed in a glass cylinder that is about the same size as a grain of rice.

  • The busy season has arrived at Bandelier National Monument, with over 500 visitors per day arriving in Frijoles Canyon to explore the Ancestral Pueblo sites and enjoy the spring weather.
    A number of events have been planned through the rest of the year for visitors to enjoy.
    In April, National Park Week (April 20-28) is a good time to visit Bandelier and other national parks and monuments. To promote  events at parks and monuments, April 22-26 will be “Fee Free Days,” with no fees charged for entry to national parks and monuments around the nation.
    This year, Bandelier National Monument will again have a summer shuttle service. Beginning on May 24, visitors arriving between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. will park at the new White Rock Visitor Center in White Rock on N.M. 4 to pay their entrance fees and ride the shuttle (no additional charge) to the monument. Visitation is already filling the parking area in Frijoles Canyon, and the shuttles will help relieve congestion once the summer season arrives. 
    Some highlights of this year’s events will include a number of trail hikes, as well as star programs. The Nightwalk will take place on Friday nights in July and August, starting from Bandelier Visitor Center.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.
    Santa Fe

    The Bitter End, 7 Caliente Road
    Date Inspected: March 29
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Trattoria Nostrani, 304 Johnson St.
    Date Inspected: March 22
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Shihumi Reamenya
    Date Inspected: March 22
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Starbucks at Target, 3550 Zafarano Road.
    Date Inspected: March 15
    Violations: No paper towels hand wash area.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Allsup’s #307, Agua Fria and Morningside
    Date Inspected: March 22
    Violations: One high risk violation — improper storage. 4 moderate risk violations — contaminated equipment. 4 low risk violations — storage and ventilation and lighting.
    Status of Establishment: No follow up required.

  • The weather is warming up and that means it’s time to build more forts at PEEC.
    The fort-building area now includes a mud pie kitchen, complete with mud muffin tins, shovels, and spatulas. Whether you are an architect or mud chef, plan to be at PEEC on Friday, 3:30-5 p.m. for First Friday Forts!
    PEEC’s Nature Play area is fun for kids of all ages. Preschoolers come during field trips to explore and find insects while older kids watch their little seedlings turn into vegetable-producing plants. Spring of 2013 promises exciting improvements to the Nature Play area, including the much-anticipated mud kitchen.
    A recently downed tree has provided new building materials, so the forts are growing bigger and better than ever. Last month saw front porch and multiple room additions to a main fort complex. There was no shortage of help hauling branches to the site, as parents and many children worked together to construct their forts. Meanwhile, kids ranging in ages 1 to 11 worked the mud into cool creations at the dirt piles.

  • On Monday, the kindergarten through the sixth graders unofficially celebrated the end of SBA testing and the countdown to spring break with a parade.
    A variety of masks were created while working with local artist and teacher, Thelma Hahn and Renee Mitsunaga, for an upcoming celebration.
    On Thursday, from 5-7 pm, a White Rock Multi-cultural Fair will take place at Chamisa with performances and displays from all around the world, presented by students, parents, friends, neighbors, staff, and community members.
    The 5th and 6th graders at Chamisa and 4th and 5th grades at Pinon have studied Carnival celebrations around the world with, artist-in-residence and former LAPS Art Teacher, Thelma Hahn.
    Funding for the six week, artist-in-residence program for White Rock schools, came through a LAPS Fine Arts Grant.
    “This project perfectly integrated into another event sponsored by the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation called “Around the World in White Rock”- Multicultural Fair,” said Mitsunaga. “Thelma Hahn was wonderful to observe and work with in our classroom. She showed her love for teaching and art through her instruction and interactions.”
    Mitsunaga benefited from Hahn’s instructional strategies and insight into the pedagogy of art.

  • Join PEEC on a historical hike of Burnt Mesa Pueblo. Dorothy Hoard will lead this popular hike to spectacular viewpoints starting at 10 a.m. Saturday.
    In the 1290s, the Ancestral Pueblo people built several villages across the Pajarito Plateau of a special design that archaeologists came to call “plaza sites.” Roomblocks were built in a tight square around a plaza with only one narrow entrance.
    The roomblocks were multistoried, even up to five stories high in some places.
    The intervening years have eroded the pueblos into mounds resembling giant donuts or bunkers. Burnt Mesa Pueblo is the most accessible of these plaza sites. It has been excavated (but backfilled) so that quite a bit is known about it.
    Hoard will share interesting facts about the trails and locations on her historical hikes.
    The level hike is two miles round trip. Estimated time is 3 hours, or a bit more if you would like to see the Los Alamos County alligator juniper trees.
    Meet at 9:30 a.m. at PEEC or 10 a.m. at the Burnt Mesa trailhead on N.M. 4. Free, no registration required.
    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center is located at 3540 Orange Street, behind the high school.
    Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information.  

  •  The Los Alamos Cooperative Market is hosting its first wine and food pairing class on Saturday in the Co-op’s Café. 

    There will be two 75 minute classes; at 1:30 p.m. and at 3 p.m. 

    Vivác Winery’s Marketing and Publicity Director Michele A. Padberg, a certified executive sommelier, will teach the basics of wine and food pairing in a relaxed setting so attendees can feel free to explore different taste sensations. 

    Experience five different Vivác wines, all using New Mexico grapes, paired to local, regional and international cheese, beef and dark chocolate. 

    Learn what to look for when pairing wine and food and how to describe the flavor sensations.