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Features

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center will air a free live webcast of the bat flight from Bracken Cave near San Antonio, Texas from 5-6:30 p.m. Sept. 18.  Chris Judson from Bandelier will be on hand to talk about the bat flight and answer questions.

    Did you know that the 20 million Mexican free-tailed bats living in Bracken Cave eat approximately 200 tons of insects every night? They emerge from the cave each evening to feed, to the wonder of scores of eager spectators.

    Now, with the age of technology, those spectators don’t even need to be in Texas. Those wanting to witness this exciting spectacle can watch “BatsLIVE: A Distance Learning Adventure” via webcast.

    Bats are the only mammals that can fly, thanks to their modified fingers and thin membrane. In order to catch insects, most bats are highly maneuverable, fly very fast and sometimes fly as far as 30-50 miles in one night. 

  • “How I Learned to Lead ‘Priedhorsky Moderate:’ Forty Adventures in Canyon Country, Starting Age 10”

    Part coming-of-age story, part exploration of local natural beauty and part compendium of debacles, Reid Priedhorsky’s talk is about the canyons of the Colorado Plateau. 

    In photographs and illustrations, he will tell the story of his 40 adventures in the ethereal landscape, which inspired the alien worlds of Calvin and Hobbes’ “Spaceman Spiff,” at 7:45 p.m. Sept. 19 at Fuller Lodge.

    Priedhorsky will speak about impacts of growing up Priedhorsky and give a presentation to show exactly what happened as a result.

  •  High atop the mesa and deep within the Jemez forest, lies a special place full of historical logging villages and pueblo ruins. This area sees little motorized traffic aside from the occasional 4-wheeler or dirt bike passing through.

    Even those who pass through fail to notice the hundreds of cultural sites along the way. These sites are often completely camouflaged by natural foliage or rocks, only noticeable to those with a trained eye.  

    Within just a few miles of mesa, adventurers can see a historical logging village, a large pueblo ruin, hundreds of lesser pueblo ruins, and rock art from multiple periods of time. Those who desire to find these places will find their way with a little research.

  • Today

    LeadHer: Los Alamos is a new, interdenominational Christian women’s group. To learn more about the international organization go to leadher.org/. For more information about LeadHer Los Alamos, contact Shona Neff at 672-1567.

     

    Mesa Public Library presents Game Night at Mesa from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Bring your games or play theirs. For all ages.

     

  • On Friday, the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series will have an encore summer concert as part of LA MainStreet’s Next Big Idea: A Festival of Discovery, Invention and Innovation.

    At 7 p.m. Friday, the series will be back at Ashley Pond for a concert with Stephanie Hatfield and Hot Mess, plus Bill Palmer’s TV Killers, two rock bands from Santa Fe.

    Hot Mess is an Indie rock band playing mostly original music with a great drummer and loud guitars. Hatfield’s vocals might remind folks of Brandi Carlile, Janis Joplin, Florence and the Machine, Adele and Sheryl Crow. Hatfield is a singer/songwriter, guitarist and is married to guitarist Bill Palmer.

    Palmer is a singer, songwriter and guitarist. He fronts the rock band that is similar in style to Tom Petty, Neil Young, Ryan Adams and Hatfield’s Hot Mess.

  • Wednesday

    Master storyteller Susan Frontczak will provide a day of instruction on how to use your voice and movements to develop a character and bring magic into the stories you tell. 9:30 a.m.–2:45 p.m. $35/$25 for PEEC, Historical Society and Chamber of Commerce members. For more information or to register, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org. 

     

    LeadHer: Los Alamos is a new, interdenominational Christian women’s group. The purpose of this group is to help women grow spiritually through revelation, inspiration, and application. LeadHer Los Alamos meets twice a month. During the first meeting, the women get together and watch a video teaching with a theme. For more information about LeadHer Los Alamos, contact Shona Neff at 672-1567.


  • As kids get back into the groove, it’s sometimes hard to gauge how happy they are to be back in school.

    This week, we look at assets in the commitment to learning category, which are #22 and #23.

    The school engagement assets find youth actively involved in their own learning. This is the season when you occasionally see some middle school students outside for part of their learning, collecting bugs for science.

    The project takes the students out of the classroom and demonstrates a hands-on, real world application to education.

  • Atomic City Children’s Theater, the Los Alamos Public Schools’ after-school theater program, announces auditions for their elementary school production of Disney’s “The Little Mermaid, Jr.,” a two-act musical play based on the hit Broadway musical and full-length movie of the same name. 

    Auditions will be from 2-5 p.m. Wednesday in the Barranca Mesa gym. They are open to any 5th or 6th grade students in the Los Alamos area. Registration begins at 1:30 p.m.

    ACCT also offers students the chance to explore other areas of technical theater, such as working lights and sound, helping with costumes and working back stage during the shows. 

  • The League of Women Voters will have their monthly Lunch with a Leader Sept. 13 at a new location —  the top floor of the Mesa Public Library. The speakers will be Tom Nagawiecki, Los Alamos Environmental Services specialist and Sandra West, outreach coordinator at the Los Alamos Co-op.  

    Food will be catered by the Los Alamos Co-op. When RSVPing, attendees can order either a whole sandwich, or a box lunch, a half sandwich with soup or salad. All orders include chips and a cookie. 

    The League will provide water. The total cost will be $10, which includes tax and gratuity.
    Learn about some of the new recycling programs that will help keep more material out of the landfill, such as the glass drop-off recycling program and provide insight on how to ensure the program is successful. 

  • September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. The Family YMCA wants to help families understand the risks of childhood obesity and how to incorporate regular physical activity and healthy eating into their lives. 

    Childhood obesity rates have soared over the last few decades. Nationally, one in three children is obese or overweight, and in New Mexico, 32.7 percent of children are affected by this epidemic, according to “F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America 2009,” a report released by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

    Obesity puts children at risk for chronic diseases often seen in adults, such as high cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. 

  • September is Arts and Culture Month in Los Alamos and Mesa Public Library will show a film performance of “Beowulf,” the heroic, epic poem dated between 800-1100, in the original Anglo Saxon, with modern English subtitles, featuring Benjamin Bagby. 

    This event will be at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 13 and is part of the regular library program, Poetry Gatherings, hosted by local poet and UNM-LA teacher, Jane Lin, which meets the second Thursday of each month.

    David Schiferl, local poet and Little Theater volunteer, suggested this program and said, “This is a rare opportunity to hear this classic epic in the original Old English performed by Benjamin Bagby, who also adds richness to the performance with his accompaniment on the Anglo Saxon harp. 

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. 

    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. 

    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

     

    DOGS

  • Sept. 9-15

    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

     

    Betty Ehart

    SUNDAY

    2 p.m. Living Treasures ceremony

  • Art exhibits

     

    The fourth biennial Taos Art Glass Invitational and Walking on Glass Tour will be Sept. 14-Oct. 7. They are both featured events in Taos’ “Grand Fall Arts,” a series of art-related events in September and October. For more information, visit tiganm.org or call Delinda VanneBrightyn at 575-613-6484.

     

    Benefits

     

  • 1. “All Thing Shining ...” Hubert Dreyfus

    2. “Encyclopedia of Santa Fe ...” Mark Cross*

    3. “109 East Palace,” Jennet Conant

    4. “Wonder,” R.J. Palacio

    5. “Survival Under Atomic Attack,” U.S. Government

    6. “Seraphina,” Rachel Hartman

  • 1. We Are Never Getting Back ..., Taylor Swift

    2. Whistle, Flo Rida

    3. Lights, Ellie Goulding

    4. One More Night, Maroon 5

    5. Some Nights, fun.

    6. Call Me Maybe, Carly Rae Jepsen

  • Chick Keller will lead a “Frijoles Canyon Devastation and Recovery Interpretive Hike” Sept. 16.  The hike is free and open to the public, with no registration required. Participants should meet at 8 a.m. at Ponderosa Campground, near the intersection of N.M. 501 and N.M. 4.  

    The hike will first go about one-and-a-half miles to the rim of Frijoles Canyon, through moderate burn damage and one badly flood-damaged site. Participants who wish to continue will hike down into the canyon to Upper Crossing and then bushwhack up-canyon about a mile farther. 

    Keller chose this hiking route to show both the devastation of the fire and subsequent flooding in upper Frijoles Canyon, habitat loss that has occurred and the amount of recovery that has taken place. Total hiking time will be about five hours, with around 500-feet of elevation gain on the way out.