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Features

  • Music

    Lads of Enchantment, a chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, invites the public to join them in song.  Besides the enjoyment of singing in harmony, barbershop chorus and quartets experience the thrill of performing in the community. They meet at 7:15 p.m. on Thursdays at the United Church of Los Alamos, Graves Hall. Attendees will find their chapter meetings are well planned, musically satisfying and fun. Visitors are welcome.
     
    The Los Alamos Community Winds invites all interested musicians to join its upcoming concerts. No audition is necessary, but proficiency on a wind or percussion instrument is required. The LACW rehearses from 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays. www.lacw.org.

  • Art openings

    An exhibition of the Santa Fe Railway’s Couse calendar prints opens from 1-4 p.m. July 17 with a public reception at the Couse-Sharp Historic Site, 146 Kit Carson Road, Taos. This exhibition of the 23 color lithographic prints of paintings by E.I. Couse that appeared on the Santa Fe Railway calendars between 1914 and 1938 will be on view (by appointment) through mid-October. This exhibition will include railway ephemera as well as artifacts from the Couse collection related to the paintings. For an appointment to view the exhibit and/or tour the Couse home and studio call 575-751-0369.  

    Exhibits

  • Get ready to let the music move you. A piece of Brazil is coming to Fuller Lodge Friday night in the form of The Samba Project.
    Los Alamos High School graduate Johnny Finn, along with Laura Ann Singh, Paul Lucas and Manny Brito, bring their diverse genre to Los Alamos residents.
    Based in Arizona, The Samba Project is a group that Finn co-created approximately two years ago with a Brazilian singer and guitarist, after he returned from spending a year in Brazil. During his time there, Finn conducted research in cultural geography for his doctorate. He focused his research on national identity, music and race.

  • Among New Mexico’s treasures are the rich cultural traditions of the Navajos. In a new traveling multimedia exhibit, “Celebrating Navajo Culture — Past and Present,” created by students from the New Mexico Highlands University Media Arts Department  rodeo, weaving and the contributions of veterans are explored.
    The exhibit will be on display in the Mesa Public Library Art Gallery through Aug. 4.
    A public reception will be from 5:30-7 p.m. July 11, with Gallery Talk by Navajo Historian Leonard Perry.
     The students worked under the guidance of Perry, president of the Crownpoint Historical and Cultural Heritage Council and NMHU faculty members Megan Jacobs, Andrew Wollner and Kerry Loewen.

  • The Los Alamos Branch of the American Association of University Women, in conjunction with Library Family Night, will present “Spaghetti and Meatballs for All” at 7 p.m. July 18 at Mesa Public Library.
    Dr. Claire Passantino at the Makefield, Penn. AAUW branch in 2004, initiated the “Let’s Read Math” program. Passantino has many years of teaching experience in grades K-8. The object of the program is to help alleviate the anxiety that many children, especially girls, have about mathematics, and to make math fun.

  • Janice Parker Muir’s oil, pastel and acrylic paintings will be displayed in a solo exhibit titled, “Fields and Scapes,” July 7-Aug. 12 at Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery.  The opening reception will be from 5-7 p.m. Thursday.
    After shoulder surgery Muir realized there was an opportunity to launch a new artistic direction. Since she could no longer sustain her normal easel position, she began using an easel that can lay flat, which allows her to paint comfortably.
    “In my mind this is a pre- and post-surgery show,” Muir said. “Most of the pastels will be the ‘pre’ with the acrylics being the ‘post.’ ”

  • Janice Parker Muir’s oil, pastel and acrylic paintings will be displayed in a solo exhibit titled, “Fields and Scapes,” July 7-Aug. 12 at Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery.  The opening reception will be from 5-7 p.m. Thursday.
    After shoulder surgery Muir realized there was an opportunity to launch a new artistic direction. Since she could no longer sustain her normal easel position, she began using an easel that can lay flat, which allows her to paint comfortably.
    “In my mind this is a pre- and post-surgery show,” Muir said. “Most of the pastels will be the ‘pre’ with the acrylics being the ‘post.’ ”

  •  The White Rock Senior Center is offering an AARP driver safety program next month. Classes will be for anyone 55 years or older, as verified by their driver’s license, from 1-5 p.m. July 28 and Aug. 25 at the WRSC. Those who attend may qualify for a discount on automobile insurance.
    As an appreciation to retired teachers, the class is free to National Retired Teachers Association members, for these two sessions only. Members should bring their NRTA membership card or number.
    The fee for each class is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members, with the check made out to AARP. This is a four-hour course and payment is by check, if not an NRTA member.
    Janet Basinger will teach the July class and Dick Foster will teach the August class.

  • Accelerate New Mexico will help students prepare for high-tech employment
    The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos has joined forces with six Northern New Mexico colleges to offer Accelerate New Mexico. The program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, provides curriculum and coaching designed to quickly prepare people of various ages and all educational backgrounds for employment in technical fields.

  • The United Church was filled with the sound of love on May 22. The Los Alamos Choral Society presented its audience with choral arrangements of love songs ranging from old folk songs spirituals, to the heartbeat of Broadway.
    Directed by Dr. Mary Badarak and accompanied by Cindy Little, the concert was a mix of literature sung with a rich tone quality and diction. There were several new, young faces in the choir and some of those young people were featured as soloists. The Choral Society is a non-auditioned choir that welcomes all who love to sing and thus includes singers of all ages and musical backgrounds.

  • At an event at the University of New Mexico recently, Technology Ventures Corporation honored TechSource for its outstanding service and growth in 2011.
    Each year, the Flying 40 Awards seeks to honor the 40 fastest-growing and highest revenue generating technology-based companies in New Mexico. TechSource, headquartered in Los Alamos, was recognized as a leading high-technology company in New Mexico.

  • Suzanne Lynne, left, and Ronda Harmon, right, won a grant last school year to provide the program, “Teach Like a Champion.” They are seen here facilitating a conversation about teaching techniques among many Los Alamos Public Schools teachers in the library at Mountain Elementary School.

  • Young people ages 8-17 will have a chance to take to the skies July 9 as the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 691 hosts a Young Eagles Flight Rally at Los Alamos County Airport.
    The rally is part of the EAA Young Eagles Program created to interest young people in aviation.
    Since the program was launched in 1992, volunteer EAA pilots have flown more than 1.4 million young people in more than 90 countries.
    “Free airplane rides are just part of the Flight Rally,” said James Shinas, spokesman for the event. “We hope to build relationships between pilots and young people, giving a new generation a chance to learn more about the possibilities that exist in the world of aviation.”

  • The best little town ever

    When sons and daughters are serving overseas in combat zones, the days can be difficult and time seems to go on forever, from one letter or phone call to the next. Folks often ask, “how do you get through it?” We get through it with the help of all the kind and wonderful people of Los Alamos.
    The outpouring of kind thoughts, caring words and the amazing generosity of all of you, with donations every week so that we can send packages to the troops at FOB Finley Shields in Afghanistan, has been overwhelmingly joyful.
    Here are a few replies from the troops serving there:

  • June 26-July 2 2011
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    9 a.m.    Toenail clipping
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Chicken and dumplings
    1:30 p.m.    Pilates
    7 p.m.    Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    10 a.m.    Low vision/hearing group

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    We get lots of roaming cats and dogs. Don’t assume your cat was a meal for a coyote or that your dog fell victim to something even scarier. This applies especially to animals missing in White Rock.

  • Soul-R&B master John Nemeth will entertain the crowd at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Pajarito Ski Hill, as part of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.  The show this week is “Pajarito Ski Hill and Los Alamos Monitor Night.”
    According to concert promoter Russ Gordon, folks used to call Nemeth a “rising blues star,” but he is now considered one of the top bluesmen in the world.
        Nemeth formed his first band at 17 in his hometown of Boise, Idaho. His friends had told him about Muddy Waters, Junior Wells and Sonny Boy Williamson and for Nemeth, it was heaven on first listen.

  • Born in a hotel and died in a hotel. That pretty much sums up the life of 20th century playwright Eugene O’Neill. The story of the playwright’s sometimes depressing, turbulent life was brought to the stage for its Los Alamos debut June 18.
    Los Alamos Little Theater and Champion Productions presented, “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill.” James Cady, who somewhat resembles O’Neill, wrote and performed the play as the Nobel Prize winner, who appears as a dead man and shares his life story with the audience. Riddled with obstacles and addiction, O’Neill was able to get past his tragedies long enough to produce his greatest works.

  • Those interested in conquering small kingdoms and showing off their word building skills somewhere other than in online games with friends might be interested in getting their geek on with the Los Alamos County Library system’s new series of programs geared toward 18-35 year olds.
    Participants interested in meeting new people, crushing their opponents in a game of “Settlers of Catan,” and those looking to show of their trivia skills will find like-minded people at the “Geekout” program.

  • One Los Alamos High School student earned his wings recently. Local Boy Scout Miguel Roman achieved the rank of Eagle in a special ceremony that took place last weekend.
    The Troop 122 Scout completed his Eagle Project earlier in the year and after many hours of work, he received the final reward.
    When the dog park in White Rock needed improvements and  general cleanup, Roman and his fellow scouts stepped in to assist.
    “We needed to dig up about a foot of dirt, pour in and spread out Santa Fe brown gravel in the dug up area,” said Roman. “Also, a small olive tree and bush, which are attaching to a fence, were to be dug up and we pulled weeds, as well.”