• The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.


    Española Headstart, 340 N. Railroad Ave.
    Date inspected: Sept. 20
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Española Hospital, 1010 Spruce St.
    Date inspected: Sept. 19
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Española Senior Citizens Center and catering, 410 Hunter St.
    Date inspected: Sept. 20
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — scoop inside, contaminating the salt. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    ETS Fairview Elementary, 1000 Zuni Lane
    Date inspected: Sept. 21
    Violations: One high-risk violation for plumbing/waste disposal — two-compartment sink drain needs immediate repair. Drain broken, issued major notice of violation.
    Note: All staff were observed wearing gloves, hair nets/restraints and clean uniforms.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    James Rodriguez Elementary, 333 Coronado St.
    Date inspected: Sept. 20

  • On a lazy afternoon, the last thing many people want to do is head to Santa Fe to look at galleries. The mention of the word can be enough to make some people look around for undone chores.
    However, Hillside Market, at 86 Old Las Vegas Hwy., has a range of services that might change some minds. With work from more than 30 New Mexican artists, antiques, a koi rescue area, a coffee shop and a large greenhouse, Hillside Market is appealing to people of all ages.
    Owners Tisha Sjostrand, Kate Sjostrand and Pam Fennell created a space for people to browse, have a cup of coffee, meet local artists, buy local produce and take a class or two. This is no high-pressure sales situation. Staff members and artists are available to give information, but customers can enjoy the items on display at their own pace, without being pushed or prodded, which is helpful, as there is so much to see.
    The variety of merchandise includes items one expects to see in art galleries, such as paintings and sculptures, but also includes jewelry, rugs, furniture and many old treasures. Another important facet of this business is that the artists are not from elsewhere, merely selling their work in New Mexico, so all purchases support New Mexico’s economy.

  • On Oct. 5, four different organizations will keep their doors open into the evening to provide an inside view of the arts community.
    Mesa Public Library Art Gallery at 2400 Central Ave. celebrates the opening of “Unmute,” a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, from 4-5:30 p.m.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books, but also other works in a wide range of media.
    “Unmute”  is an exhibition of works on paper from the permanent collection of the University Art Gallery at New Mexico State University that question the assumptions about the relationship of language and image in visual art.
    It explores in depth what happens when artists indulge the fundamental impulse to breach the supposed boundaries between the verbal and the visual.
    Also from 4-5:30 p.m., the Los Alamos Historical Society,1050 Bathtub Row, will feature photographs of Manhattan Project veteran Jack Aeby, who took the only known color photo of the world’s first atomic blast at Trinity Site. Their permanent exhibits feature all eras of Los Alamos history, including a section on post-war “Cold War” era Pacific testing, a domestic bomb shelter and more.

  • Mesa Public Library Art Gallery, with support from the Friends of Los Alamos County Libraries, will host a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, including the closest form of that relationship, the artist’s book.
    The event is from 4-5:30 p.m. Oct. 5 and is part of the Arts Crawl Evening, which includes the Los Alamos Historical Museum, Fuller Lodge Art Center and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books but also other works in a wide range of media as well. Works by 52 artists, many of world renown, provide a strong showing of how text and image combine to make visually and intellectually compelling art. Sol Lewitt, Joyce Kozloff, Hans Haacke, Melissa Grimes, Jaune Quick to See Smith, Pat Steir, Carrie Mae Weems, to name a few, are among those artists whose work is included in the exhibit, one so fitting to be shown in a library. New Mexico institutions have treasures in their collections, a resource to share across the state and across institutional venues for all New Mexicans and visitors to enjoy.

  • Aiyeswaria Jeganathan was the 2012 Chalk Walk grand prize winner. The Chalk Walk is held annually in front of Fuller Lodge, as part of the Next Big Idea Festival

  • The students of the Los Alamos High School Naval Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps would like the community to assist their program by not just opening their wallets, but your mouths.
    The monthly Barbecue Brisket Night kicks off Thursday, remaining a steadfast fundraiser for more than three years.
    The menu will include barbecue brisket, a vegetable, potato, roll and dessert for $10 and will be served at the Sheriff’s Posse Lodge, from 5:30-7 p.m.
    LAHS Booster Club President Brenda Kelley explains how the fundraising opportunities throughout the community will help teams with their participation at competition.
    “This allows the instructors to concentrate on core instruction and training they provide to the cadets,” Kelley said. “The value gained by the additional activities can be measured by the many trophies, awards, ribbons and other formal recognition but the biggest and best prize is the positive experiences provide to the cadets.”
    The training and experience offered through the programs provides students with hands-on opportunities from serving others to achieving personal goals that fill lifetime learning experiences.
    For more information about the program, call 663-3227.

  • The Los Alamos Arts Council hosted the third annual Sec Sandoval Chalk Walk last Saturday. It was a beautiful day and Fuller Lodge lawn was bustling with artists of all ages expressing their creativity on the sidewalks. Artists of all ages had an enjoyable time.
    Thank you to those who helped to make the event interesting and fun. We were a part of the Next Big Idea Festival and enjoyed all of the activity provided by the nearby booths. Fuller Lodge lawn was definitely the place to be.
    Special thanks goes to Sec Sandoval who attended the event and talked with many of the budding artists about their artistic efforts.
    Thank you to those local businesses that provided prizes for the different categories:
    Coffee House Café, Home Run Pizza, Village Arts, Reel Deal Theater, Metzger’s, Starbucks Coffee, Ruby K’s and  Daniel’s Café. LAAC appreciates your support of our community events.
    LAAC also thanks the Los Alamos County Parks Division for their help in washing away the artistic designs on Sunday. This is in keeping with the reality of the fleeting life of chalk drawings.
    The event could not happen without Arts Council board members who helped with the preparation and monitoring the event.

  • The Rotary Club of Los Alamos, which sponsors Youth Exchange programs overseas, will make a lunchtime (11:15 a.m.) presentation about educational opportunities abroad in the Speech Theater at Los Alamos High School on Wednesday.
    All students (and their parents) who are interested in learning about Rotary’s Youth Exchange program are encouraged to attend. Parents will need to check-in at the main office.
    Find out how to qualify and apply, what responsibilities students have while abroad and what the general expenses will be.
    See a video, get a brochure and information packet, and ask questions about a foreign study experience.
    For more information, contact Linda Hull, president, Rotary Club of Los Alamos, 662-7950.

  • Our community goal for this week is to increase the number of youth that read for pleasure.
    That means reading three or more hours per week for fun.
    The reading for pleasure category is one of the bottom data points for the community, provided by the last data capture.
    Asset number 25 only comes in at 32 percent when the data is tallied and with school work abounding, may be hard for some students to increase during certain times.
    What is my answer to the problem?
    I suggest you head over to Mesa Public Library and talk to Angie Manfredi.
    Tell her your student likes zombies or finds Captain Underpants hilarious and she will provide a solution.
    If you tell her you like adventure, she could probably reel off a list of four titles that would spark your interest.
    Manfredi is a card catalog on legs. For those too young to know what a card catalog is, feel free to ask any librarian for an explanation.
    If you are a super bold parent or caregiver, drag your pre-teen, ’tween or teenager down to the youth services section and find her. Make that child hold a two-minute conversation and they will leave that library with enough ideas to last them for months.

  • The Los Alamos High School Navy JROTC co-hosted the annual New Mexico Summer Biathlon with La Cueva High School in Albuquerque, Sept. 15. Fifty-six individuals representing eight schools participated.
    This year, the Los Alamos girl’s team of Tessa Snyder, Rachael Barthell, Marissa Ronquillo and Joanna O’Neill took first place in their division by besting the La Cueva girl’s team by three minutes. O’Neill took first place overall for the girls and Snyder took third.
    In the boys division, the Los Alamos team of Tristan Goodwin, Samuel Wolfe, David Murphy and Richard Whittemore took second by posting a team time just one minute behind the winning team from Eldorado High School. Individually, Goodwin took second and Wolfe was third.

  •  The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.
    Five Border Collie puppies (Desmond, Bones, Reggie, Romper and Fly) — Four-months-old, four males and one female. They are pretty shy and the volunteers are working on socialization. Keep watching as they develop into fun, approachable pups.
    Minestrone — Currently in foster care, getting ready for a new family.
    Remy — Spayed female Shepherd-mix now adapting to her new circumstances.

  • Former Los Alamos High School student William O’Donnell, has produced the film “Education is Hope,” tracing the impact of education in Kenya on students, their family and their community.
    There will be a free screening at 6 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Reel Deal Theater.
    “Education is Hope” is a grassroots film that will transport the audience to a country where poverty and back-breaking labor can usually only be overcome by education. 
    Education for young Kenyans is a sometimes elusive goal, hindered by the day-to-day responsibilities of maturing children to help support their families through hard labor. Dylan Westfall and O’Donnell embark on a journey through three months in Kenya.
    While living, sleeping and eating with the locals, they document the hardships and beliefs held among many Kenyan’s that only education can lift the poor, diseased and marginalized out of desperate circumstances.
    In the film, locals tell their stories, which illustrate that the hope of education is warranted. It shows that those who complete high school and some form of higher education find opportunities that would otherwise be non-existent.
    Meet the producers and Fredah, a Kenyan woman featured in the film, with a reception to follow. 

  • Ed Stein has been playing table tennis since 1934. The most senior member of the Los Alamos Table Tennis Club, he turned 90-years-old Sept. 12. He has been constantly involved with Los Alamos table tennis for many years and helped found the current club, with the help of Herman Owens, in 1970. Stein was ranked nationally with his highest ranking in 1976. He was a national umpire in the 1960s. The Los Alamos Table Tennis Club meets from 7-10:30 p.m. every Tuesday night and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. with a fee of $2 per player, and every Saturday morning for free on the bottom floor of the Betty Ehart Senior Center. All skill levels are welcome. For more information, contact club president Avadh Saxena at Avadh_s@hotmail.com.

  • The Los Alamos High School ’Topper Parent Organization is for parents who would like to be involved, to help ensure the best possible educational experience at LAHS. For more information about the TPO, visit laschools.net/LAHS/committeesandorganizations/tpo.
    One of the ongoing activities of the LAHS TPO is to present a list of items requested by LAHS staff to meet or enhance educational needs. Parents, community groups and individuals are encouraged to donate.
    Drop off items at the LAHS front office with a note indicating which department and to whom you would like the donation directed.  
    The following items have been requested:
    All departments
    and staff
    • Kleenex

    Attendance/bookkeeping, attention:
    Maire O’Neill
    • Kleenex (12)

    Biology, attention: Stephanie Mitchell
    • Kleenex
    • Stapler
    • Electronic pencil
    • Dry erase markers
    • Construction paper
    • Plastic rulers (10)
    • Dish drying rack
    and mat for cleaning lab

    Chemistry, attention: Rachel Cowan
    • Kleenex
    • Re-fillable scotch tape
    dispensers (2 or 3)
    • Wide clear packaging

  • As part of the Authors Speak Series, William Dunmire will present a free, 45-minute slide-illustrated program that will take listeners on a tour through New Mexico’s six ecoregions and along some of the magnificent state and National Scenic Byways at 7 p.m. Sept. 27 in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
    From grasslands to mountains, deserts to forests, this talk will focus on the wide range of New Mexico’s landscape features. Blue Gramma grass, apache plume, mesquite and yucca, elk, burrowing owls and cranes are just a few of the the plants and wildlife that occur in the ecoregions Dunmire explores.
    His narrative, along with color photography, will provide audiences with an understanding of the elements that define the natural environments and will direct road travelers to many of the state’s best-loved natural features.
    “New Mexico’s Living Landscapes: A Roadside View  by William Dumire,” features photographs by Christine Bauman.
    “New Mexico’s Living Landscapes” is a guide through the ecoregions and down the scenic byways of the state’s natural world, from grasslands to mountains to deserts, focusing on some of  the landscape features and the plants and wildlife found therein.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Cariños Charter School, 116 Calle Espinoza
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — sanitizer at <50 ppm. Corrected.
    Notes: Cariños serving staff must attend the in-house food safety class when offered.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Carlos Vigil Middle School, 1602 Johnny Roybal Industrial Park Road
    Date inspected: Sept. 7
    Violations: One high-risk violation for poor personal hygiene — No towels at hand wash sink, out at serving line. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Santa Fe
    Airport Shell, 7510 Airport Road
    Date inspected: Sept. 10
    Violations: Two moderate-risk violations, one for improper holding — no thermometer inside walk-in refrigerator; one for contaminated equipment — soda machine dispensers were not cleaned and sanitized.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Baked in Tesuque, 138 C.R. 73
    Date inspected: Sept. 10

  • • The Los Alamos Choral Society is preparing for its January 2013 Winter Concert that will feature Handel’s “Messiah.” Regular rehearsals, which begin Sept. 25, are at 7 p.m. Tuesdays at the United Church. All singers are welcome.

    • The Los Alamos Concert Association presents Rachel Barton Pine, playing works by Mozart, Villa-Lobos and Brahms, at 4 p.m. Sept. 23 at the Duane Smith Auditorium. Tickets, $30, are available at losalamosconcert.org or at Otowi Station Bookstore and CB Fox in Los Alamos; Smith’s Food and Drug in White Rock; and at Nicholas Potter and the Lensic Box Office in Santa Fe. Tickets are also available for $35 at the door. For more information, call 662-9000.

  • Quilts galore will be on display at the 2012 Quilt Market.
    Co-sponsored by the Los Alamos Piecemaker’s Quilt Guild and Jemez Mountains Bear Paw Quilting Guild, the event will be from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 29 at Crossroads Bible Church.
    Members have made quilted “treasures” that will be for sale. Bed quilts, table runners, placemats, wall hangings and wearable items are just a few of the items that will be featured.
    There is a selection of holiday quilted items, including mug rugs, cosmetic bags and ornaments. Co-chairs for the market, Libby Carlsten and Brenda Edeskuty, both agree that there is something for everyone.  
    The “Smokey River Quilt,” is the name of this year’s donation quilt. The item has been designed, pieced and quilted by members and will be raffled off at 3:30 p.m. Tickets for a chance to win the quilt will be on sale.
    There will be a section of second-hand and gently used quilt-related items for sale as well. Some offerings will include fabric, books, tools, patterns, equipment, unfinished projects and other quilting-related items.
    Once again, there will also be a Silent Auction at the Quilt Market with children’s quilts, wall hangings and table runners. One wall hanging features the 12 days of Christmas.

  • Los Alamos Middle School students and Principal Rex Kilburn pose with the 100 BEST trophy as it tours through Los Alamos Public Schools.