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Features

  • The display case at Mesa Public Library will feature embroidered artwork stitched by members of the Pajarito Chapter of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, through Oct. 26. The EGA is a national educational organization dedicated to promoting and preserving needle arts. There are a number of different types of needlework in the display.
    The local chapter meets on the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in Gibson Fellowship Hall of Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Los Alamos. Each meeting features a program on a stitching technique or project. During the past year the group has explored stump work (three-dimensional embroidery), chicken scratch or gingham embroidery, crazy quilting, New Mexican colcha embroidery and Kumihimo (Japanese braiding.)
    Between 10 a.m. and noon Oct. 20, members of Pajarito Chapter will be in the lobby of Mesa Public Library to demonstrate various embroidery techniques. Watch the stitchers at work. They’ll explain the various techniques and answer questions. For more information call Marilyn at 672-9404.

     

  • Join Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 9:10 a.m. Oct. 27 for a hike across Beanfield Mesa. Living Treasure, author and local historian Dorothy Hoard will lead participants around the mesa top, past historic locations and to viewpoints.
    Prior to 1943, two old roads were built to access a farm high atop Beanfield Mesa.  Located across Rendija Canyon, north of Barranca Mesa, the mesa featured a substantial line cabin (lost in the 2000 Cerro Grande fire).  
    Those farmers tended crops on Beanfield Mesa, but the history of the mesa also includes sheep, cattle and logging. During the hike, Hoard will talk about this historic location and the importance of Veronica Springs, a welcome sight in dry times that probably fed a sawmill at one point.
    This hike will loop around the mesa to include both roads and also check out two game pits — one probably real, the other suspicious. This is a moderate hike.
    Some stretches are very rocky, though not particularly steep. Some parts of the route have no established trail.
    Come experience the views and a historic area of Los Alamos. Meet at PEEC at 9:10 a.m. to carpool or at the trailhead at 9:30 a.m. Bring water and sunscreen. Free, no registration required.

  • Margaret Wood will share stories and memories of her time with Georgia O’Keeffe as part of the Authors Speak Series at 7 p.m. Oct. 25 in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
    In 1977, Wood  began a five-year stay as companion and caretaker to then 89-year-old Georgia O’Keeffe.
    There were no sign posts in the village in those years and few markers for a young woman managing the complex role as companion to a woman of O’Keeffe’s stature, who nonetheless was now dependent on others to maintain the independent life she had cultivated.                        
    Growing and preparing food was one of O’Keeffe’s greatest pleasures, with the artist mentoring her young caregiver on the art of gardening and cooking. Wood and O’Keeffe often walked the red hills of Ghost Ranch in early evenings.
    The artist had a reputation of living a secluded life, but in fact enjoyed welcoming a host of visitors to her home. Wood shares anecdotes about these social exchanges, along with a treasure trove of stories              intimately shared in her new book, “Remembering Miss O’Keeffe: Stories from Abiquiu.”

  • The 35th Annual Fall Arts and Crafts Fair presented by the Fuller Lodge Art Center Saturday, offers a “Gateway to the Holidays” shopping experience with a showcase of artists and craftspeople. The show features more than 60 artists representing 22 communities and three states.
    The artists present a wide selection of contemporary arts and crafts, ranging from functional to decorative. Both two- and three-dimensional works will be featured including ceramics, fabric and fiber, glass, jewelry, metal, wood, painting and photography. 
    This year, the Art Center is holding the fair at the Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road. This venue will hold enough artists for variety, while still maintaining an intimate shopping experience. To help celebrate the new location, there will be a number of door prizes. Anyone who visits may enter the drawing. Pick up a ticket at the front door, go to the stage and punch a hole in the ticket, then drop it in the “draw” box on the way out. This will help the Art Center get a count of attendees and encourage visitors to wander through the whole fair, hopefully looking at many of the works displayed.

  • A small “barn-raising” will be held 4-6 p.m. Oct. 23 at the Los Alamos Cooperative Market, 95 Entrada Dr., in conjunction with a national State Farm Youth Advisory Board grant award presentation.
    Youth and adult volunteers are welcome to assist with the construction and decoration of a small hoop house at the Co-op, which is a partnering satellite location for the funded community garden project.
    The State Farm Youth Advisory Board awarded a $96,250 grant to the Los Alamos Juvenile Justice Advisory Board in support of an educational and outreach community garden.
    The JJAB has contracted The Family YMCA to deliver the grant’s education and food-assistance objectives throughout the next year.
    This is the second award by the State Farm Youth Advisory Board to the JJAB for their Los Alamos Youth Food Project. The funding has provided seed money in order to mobilize middle and high school youth in support of sustainable healthy eating.
    Youth and adult volunteers can paint and decorate the hoop-house from 4-6 p.m. Oct. 23. The hoop house will be used for winter planting and spring seedling starters. State Farm representatives will also present a commemorative check to JJAB officials at 4:30 p.m.

  • Janali Gustafson, a senior at Los Alamos High School was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for September. Gustafson is the daughter of Sarah and John Gustafson and the sister of Elena and Nathaniel.
    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one student each month of the school year to honor as a Student of the Month. In addition to high school seniors, high school juniors are now eligible for the recognition. Students are nominated by their teachers and chosen on the basis of their academic achievement, extracurricular activities and in particular, their service to the community.
    Community service has been an important part of Gustafson’s four years at LAHS.  Since her freshman year, she has been a member of Los Alamos Youth Leadership.
    With her interest in establishing positive relationships between elementary school students and high school students, she organized Wild Day, a Saturday of recreational activities for elementary school students and also LAYL’s largest community service project.
    Through the high school’s Environmental Club, Gustafson has also helped coordinate projects designed to motivate the community to adopt a greener lifestyle.  

  • Today we focus on improving school climate and I will spend the day with the Aspen Tiger sixth graders, presenting the Change of Heart program.
    I believe that one of the most important things we need to do is to make every school a safe place to learn.
    We present this program at every elementary school and at Los Alamos Middle School for all new students to the district.
    Often, the stories shared by students who come from other schools, is astonishing.
    Just yesterday at Cookies and Conversation, one young man spoke of life at school before coming to the Los Alamos Public Schools District.
    The fact that the classrooms are calm, the teachers are engaged and students don’t rule should be a standard, but I’m confused why the whole country doesn’t have the same standard.
    As families, we should teach our kids to be nice, tolerate others, do unto others — or just ignore someone they don’t get along with at school.
    I assume the hard part is that not everyone comes from the same home, doesn’t have parents that support differences, doesn’t think you should love your neighbor as you love yourself, or maybe even to love yourself in the first place.
    We expect the schools to be able to accomplish the goals we don’t set forth in our own homes.

  • The annual Los Alamos County Science Fair will take place Jan. 26, 2013 in the Los Alamos High School Commons Areas. The public is invited to view the projects between 1-3 p.m.
    LAPS and home school students in grades four through 12 will display projects in fourth and fifth grade individual elementary, K-sixth grade elementary class, six through eighth grade junior division and nine through 12th grade senior division.
    The elementary projects are divided into three categories.
    The students in junior and senior divisions will compete for first, second and third place and honorable mention in 17 categories. This will give them an opportunity to participate in the Northeastern New Mexico Regional Science and Engineering Fair in Las Vegas, N.M. March 3, 2013.
    Every student will receive feedback from the judges, which will assess the student’s scientific approach, skills, creativity, clarity and thoroughness. Therefore, the participation in the County Science Fair is experience for student learning.
    Participation at the science fair helps the students to achieve State Standard I for every student in every grade level. This standard requires students to understand the processes of scientific investigations and use inquiry and scientific ways of observing, experimenting, predicting and validating to think critically.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    DOGS
    Axle — Don’t let those sad-looking eyes fool you. Axle is a playful and affectionate neutered male. The shelter temperament testers describe this Pit-mix as a total sweetheart. He would love a family that appreciates big, sloppy dog kisses.
    Bear — Large year-old male Heeler-mix. Housebroken, people oriented. Reported to be good with dogs.
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.

  • Nestled in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Taos is one of Northern New Mexico’s tourist destinations. With its share of galleries, museums and culture, it’s not hard to figure out what attracts out-of-towners to the area.
    Los Alamos might be the secret city, but Taos has some secrets of its own. Beneath Taos’ arts community and picturesque landscape, lies a dark, sometimes sinister history. It might be hard for some tourists to imagine that the Taos Plaza was once the site of various hangings and killings and that beneath the ground they are walking on, exist secret, underground tunnels.
    Many of the tourist attractions around the Plaza are allegedly haunted. From the Alley Cantina and Hotel La Fonda, to Moby Dickens Bookstore and the Mabel Dodge Luhan House, it’s not hard to find a specter hangout. Ask the shopkeepers and locals and they’ll likely tell you the stories behind the hauntings — and if you’re lucky ­— they might share some of their ghostly encounters.

  • The Major General Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of the Military Order of World Wars in Los Alamos announces that Janet McMillan (Charles) will present a talk at the Oct. 16 MOWW Chapter 229 Dinner meeting.  
    The meeting will be at the Hilltop House, third floor and will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    McMillan’s presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The dinner entrée is vegetarian crepe with asparagus tips, salad and roll for $23 per person.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to the general public for the dinner and program, or the program only at no cost. Please note that a dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s).
    RSVP for the dinner is needed by Sunday. Call Lt. Col. Gregg Giesler, AUS retired, chapter commander, at 662-5574 or send email to g.giesler@computer.org; or Lt. Col. Norman G. Wilson, USAF retired, chapter adjutant at 662-9544 or email Nrmwil5@cs.com.
    Act of Congress chartered the Military Order of the World Wars in 1919 as a national patriotic organization.

  • Jed Williamson knows how people get in trouble in the mountains. He has been the chair of the Safety Advisory Council and the editor of the American Alpine Club’s annual report, Accidents in North American Mountaineering, since 1974.  
    At 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at Fuller Lodge, Williamson will present an overview of his knowledge of moving through the mountains with other people, what works and what goes wrong.
    His presentation will include detailed analysis of the many factors that add up to an accident, not just weather and terrain, but human fallibility in behaviors and judgment.
    Through his knowledge, he will teach the facts and give some perspective on how to take risks and maximize the possibility of safe passage at the same time. His talk will cover trends and patterns in mountaineering and wilderness accidents and analysis of some classic accidents.
    Williamson has been a practitioner and consultant in education and outdoor pursuits, including more than 60 safety and quality reviews and accident investigations and 16 accreditation reviews.
    He was a member of the Board of the American Alpine Club from 1974 to 1998 and elected as an honorary member in 2007.

  • The display case at Mesa Public Library will feature embroidered artwork stitched by members of the Pajarito Chapter of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, through Oct. 26. The EGA is a national educational organization dedicated to promoting and preserving needle arts. There are a number of different types of needlework in the display.
    The local chapter meets on the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in Gibson Fellowship Hall of Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Los Alamos. Each meeting features a program on a stitching technique or project. During the past year the group has explored stump work (three-dimensional embroidery), chicken scratch or gingham embroidery, crazy quilting, New Mexican colcha embroidery and Kumihimo (Japanese braiding.)
    Between 10 a.m. and noon Oct. 20, members of Pajarito Chapter will be in the lobby of Mesa Public Library to demonstrate various embroidery techniques. Watch the stitchers at work. They’ll explain the various techniques and answer questions. For more information call Marilyn at 672-9404.

     

  • Natali Steinberg, docent of the Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve, is offering her guided tour leaving from Pajarito Environmental Education Center at noon.  
    This small preserve, located near Rancho de las Golondrinas just south of Santa Fe, has several ecological niches, ranging from scrub desert to the lush vegetation of the cienega (Spanish for “marsh”).  
    This range supports a wide diversity of plant and animal life.  Three trails, one of which is handicap-accessible, lead walkers through these areas, including open meadows, shady cottonwoods and a pond bordered by cattails.
    On this visit, expect to see bullfrogs and maybe some tadpoles, as well as a Bewick’s wren nesting in the donation box, Red Wing Blackbirds nesting in the cattails and possibly some Mallards or Coots.
    PEEC welcomes all who wish to join this field trip. Meet at PEEC, 3540 Orange St., to carpool or caravan to the Preserve.
    Bring good walking shoes, lunch and water. The trip is free, but contact PEEC by calling 662-0460 or register on their website so they will know whom to expect.
    White Rock people could meet at the Y if they wish. The trip will last approximately four hours (one hour driving each way, two hours at the Preserve).
    For more information on the preserve, go to  santafebotanicalgarden.org.

  • Come to PEEC from 7 – 8 p.m. to Hear how the Las Conchas fire affected the Valles Caldera National Preserve from Rebecca Oertel, a forest and range plant ecologist at the VCNP, from 7-8 p.m. Oct. 16.
    Oertel grew up in Los Alamos, obtained a degree in biochemistry and has worked in the Jemez Mountains Area for the past 18 years as a biologist.  
    Although Oertel has been at the VCNP for one year, her extensive experience in the Jemez Mountains includes 11 years as a biologist at Bandelier National Monument, nine of which were with the U.S. Geological Society under Dr. Craig Allen at the Jemez Mountain Field Station.  
    There, she performed scientific research in long-term ecological monitoring including botany, ecohydrology, tree demography and dendrochronology.  
    In addition, her checkered background includes biochemical cancer research, EPA Superfund cleanup, LANL environmental monitoring, radioactive materials handling and disposal and a Helitack wildland firefighter in Santa Fe National Forest.
    This presentation will include photographs and a discussion of Las Conchas Fire effects on the VCNP and possible short-term ecological outcomes in the Jemez Mountains.  

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Don Quixote Vanilla, 236 Rio Bravo
    Date inspected: Oct. 3
    Violations: One low-risk violation for poor personal hygiene — must wear hair restraints.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    El Rigoberto’s Taco Shop, 166 Central Park Square
    Date inspected: Oct. 3, opening
    Violations: One moderate-risk violation for contaminated equipment — seal around walk-in refrigerator may need replacing. Two low-risk violations for floors/walls/ceilings — ceiling panel missing, will put in today; self-closing devices for men’s restroom needed.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Elk’s Lodge, 1601 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 4, follow-up
    Violations: Two high-risk violations for contaminated equipment — scoop for ice was laying on top of ice machine. Corrected. Placed in container after washing it; sanitizer > 200 ppm. Corrected.  
    Notes: Thermometer read 142 degrees on green chile. Inspector’s thermometer read 147 degrees. All food handlers must wear caps and gloves.

  • Art as therapy is not uncommon. It’s a way to release pent-up feelings, but can also breathe new life into the artist and give that person a way to express his feelings.
    For Santa Fe artist Marck Romero, art has provided a way for him to release his inner feelings and has given him a new lease on life.
    As a recovering addict, Romero found his inner artist while in jail. Clean for three years, art came from sobriety. “It’s always something I wanted to do, but never did it,” he said. He said he got clean, reconnected with his spirit and was able to do art.
    Romero is no stranger to the creative process, however. He used to be a tattoo artist and is a guitarist and vocalist in XMortis, a heavy metal/thrash band. He’s also pursuing a degree in drug and alcohol abuse counseling and is scheduled to graduate from Santa Fe Community College next year.
    “Getting clean did so much for me,” he said.
    Romero said drawing is a favorite thing for him to do, but the art he’s been creating recently isn’t just about drawing. It’s about bringing his creations to life by putting paint on wood. But if you’re thinking retablo-style work, think again. Romero’s creations are dark and 3D.

  • Finding a decent Northern New Mexican meal isn’t hard if you’re willing to take a short drive.
    There are plenty of places in Santa Fe that offer traditional New Mexican fare. There are also a few places in Española where you can get a meal reminiscent of those grandma used to make; La Cocina is one of those places. Just to be clear, we’re talking about the location at 415 Santa Clara Bridge Road, not Steve’s La Cocina, behind the fueling station on Los Alamos Highway.
    A recent trip to La Cocina proved to be satisfying and did not cause sticker shock when the bill came. The worst part of the experience was trying to decide on what to order. There is quite a variety to choose from. They offer everything from American comfort food like chicken fried steak and mashed potatoes, to burgers and sandwiches. But one doesn’t go to a Northern New Mexican restaurant for a hamburger (though they are probably pretty good). No,  one goes there for either a red or green chile fix.
    Enchiladas, burritos, tostadas and more grace the pages of the menu, each one tempting the diner to try something they don’t usually order.

  • Join the Los Alamos County Recreation Division Oct. 27 for the pirate-themed Pumpkin splash and Halloween carnival at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center. This family event will be from 10 a.m-1 p.m. and includes pirate-themed carnival games, jumping into the pool and finding a pumpkin, decorating the pumpkin and watching pirate movies.
     The cost for the event is $ 7 per person. Sign-up at the aquatic center. The event is limited to 150 participants. For more information, contact the recreation division at 662-8173, visit the website at losalamosnm.us/rec, or email lacrec@lacnm.us.

  • Locals and visitors alike use the free access to online computers in the Reference and Youth areas at Mesa Public Library. Coming in mid-October, this service will be upgraded to provide a better experience.
    According to Gwen Kalavaza, Electronic Services manager for the Los Alamos County Library System, “The new computers will be faster, monitors will have larger screens, there will be enhanced security features, the computers are flash drive compatible and a brand new sign-up and printing program will make access easier.
    “The new system will offer quick, streamlined log-in for both computer use and printing: patrons will log in using their library card barcode or visitors may get a one-time use guest pass from either the Reference desk or Youth Services desk staff.”
    While the library completes the upgrade in both the Reference and Youth areas at Mesa, access will be unavailable Oct.16 for the switchover.
    Check with Reference and Youth staff for details.
     For information about this and all library programs and services, call 662-8240 or 662-8253 or visit losalamosnm.us/library.