.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Best Overall and People’s Choice: LA Heart Council, “The Tin Man Found His Heart”

    Best Business Traditional: Flowers By Gillian, “Flower Lady”

    Best Business Contemporary: Village Arts, “Batte’s Up!”

    Best Organization Traditional: LAHS Living Skills Class, “Hilltopper Spirit”

    Best Organization Contemporary: LA Public Schools Foundation, “Ignorance is Scary”
        
    Best Family Contemporary: Dare-Morgan Families, “Friends Together in One Spirit”
                    
    Best Dressed Award: Little Theater, “Woman in Black”

    The Rock and Roll Award: Canyoncito Montessori, “Rockin’ Kids”

    Skinniest Scarecrow Award: Sunrise Therapeutics, “It  Works”

    The Pain Free Award: B-Fit Chiropractic, “Spinal Health”
    The Ageless Award: LARC, “Fit at any Age”

    Earth Day Award: PEEC, “Halloween Hikers”

    Cutest Scarecrow in a Can Award: Rotary Club of Los Alamos, “Oscar the Grouch”

    Gold Medal Award: LA School of Gymnastics

  • Those that attend the Festival of Chocolate Saturday will get a sneak peek at the trees on display for the Festival of Trees at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

  • Settling an estate can be difficult and time consuming. Those that have been in the position of trying to find all the papers and information needed at the time of death and for estate settlement, know how much time and frustration can be involved. “After I’m Gone — Things to think about your Estate” is a program intended to provide individuals with information to make the process easier.  
    “After I’m Gone — Things to think about your Estate,” will be presented by Don Davidson, from 9 a.m.-noon Friday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, 1100 Bathtub Row.  
    Davidson will share what he has learned going through the process of getting his affairs in order. Learn what you can be done to help a family handle their affairs upon a loved one’s death.  
    The Los Alamos Cooperative Extension Service and the Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization are sponsoring this program.  
    Those that would would like to join the seniors for lunch at 11:30 a.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center can do so for a suggested donation of $4 (for seniors).
    For more information, Paula Roybal Sánchez at 662-2656.

  • The Rotary Club of Los Alamos would like to thank the community for its generous support of our recent flower bulbs fundraiser to support our annual end-of-year financial awards to Los Alamos High School seniors. 
    Through the hard work of a dedicated club committee and the interest of our many customers, we also collected numerous donations of bulbs purchased for the new LAHS Memorial Garden, which is being designed and built through collaborations among our Rotary Club, Los Alamos Public Schools, Oasis Landscape and Los Alamos Landscaping. 
    With several hundred bulbs purchased specifically for the Memorial Garden, it will be resplendent in springtime with red tulips, pink tulips and daffodils.
    The garden is now under construction on the LAHS campus between the library and gym complex, close to Diamond Drive.
    Our note of appreciation would not be complete without thanking Los Alamos National Bank, CB Fox and Dixie Girl Restaurant for providing space for us on several occasions to conduct our sales; a special thank-you also goes to Fuller Lodge Art Center and Crossroads Bible Church for giving us outdoor space during the recent arts and crafts fair held at the church to benefit the art center.

  • This week, I’d like to continue along the Community Values Youth path, with a spin on Community Values Itself.
    Thank goodness it is Election Day, because it will finally be over tonight.
    Perhaps the Mayans were wrong and they didn’t mean the world would end, but by the time this election came to pass, we might wish it had ended.
    The most important thing is that if you are eligible to vote, that you cast your ballot. I believe if you don’t vote, you forfeit the right to complain.
    As a nation, we have been horrible role models to our children during this entire process.
    So take a minute to see it through the eyes of the children.
    As a speech communications major, I love to listen to the debates and try not to argue with the television … I said, I try.
    No matter what the outcome, tomorrow we need to do a good job to model acting like grown-ups.
    Try and be old school tomorrow and reflect back on the days when you honored the position, no matter who sat behind the desk.
    Jenna Bush Hager did a wonderful piece on the “Today Show” this morning, about youth elections.
    We can learn a lot from the children.

  • Volunteers are being recruited for the 2013 event planning committee for the American Cancer Society’s signature fundraising event Relay For Life of Los Alamos.
    Dedicated volunteers are needed with skills and talents in the areas of communication, marketing, sales, technology, training, motivation, photography, creativity and organization.
    Relay For Life is a fundraiser that allows participants from all walks of life — including patients, medical support staff, corporations, civic organizations, churches and community volunteers — to celebrate the lives of those who have faced cancer, remember loved ones lost to cancer and fight back against the disease.
    “Relay For Life is a community owned, volunteer-driven event that is about awareness and the progress made against cancer,” said Gloria Martinez, Relay For Life manager.  “Individuals who are willing to give their time and energy to this exciting event, as a volunteer or participant, have made a commitment to fight back against this disease and let the community know that you can beat cancer.”
    Relay For Life is a family oriented, team event where participants walk around a track relay-style overnight.

  • Heart Smart Poster Contest Winners

    The Family YMCA and Los Alamos Heart Council co-sponsored a Heart Smart Poster Contest for children in grades K-6th.
    Posters were judged on originality and the healthy message it depicted, winning posters were displayed at the Los Alamos Health Fair. The following children won prizes for their posters:

    Kindergarten through third grade

    First place: Heidi and Wendy Sheppard
    Second place: Sarah Taylor
    Third place: Ryan Worley
    Fourth place: John Worley

    Fourth through sixth grade

    First place: Sarah Worley
    Second place: Eliana Rodriguez
    Third place: Paulina Burnside
    Fourth place: Maarla Duffield

  • This year’s Veterans Day community celebration will be at 11 a.m. Nov. 11 at the American Legion Post 90, 1325 Trinity Dr. All veterans, their families and friends, as well as the general public are invited to attend. The local theme is “Honoring the Vietnam Veteran.”
    More than three million men and women served in Vietnam and more than 58,000 made the ultimate sacrifice.
    Veterans Day is a national holiday to thank and honor the 23 million living veterans that have honorably served their country in both wartime and peacetime. There are currently 1.4 million Americans serving in the U.S. military with thousands currently deployed overseas, many in harm’s way.   
    This year’s guest of honor and speaker will be Major Dave Carver, USMC (ret).
    Carver served more than 20 years in the U.S. Marine Corps. He is a Los Alamos resident and Los Alamos National Laboratory employee. He served in a variety of positions in a long and distinguished career. Carver was wounded four times in action in Vietnam serving as a radioman in an infantry company.
    Deacon Michael Irving, from the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church of Los Alamos, will deliver the invocation and benediction.

  • Tickets to a land of chocolate are available for $20, from the Betty Ehart Senior Center — and the trip is scheduled for Nov. 10.
    The annual Festival of Chocolate will be from 7 p.m.-9 p.m. to benefit local senior and youth programs.
    The Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization and Champions of Youth Ambitions have teamed together for the fundraiser.
    “We could not do this event without volunteers,” said Pauline Powell Schneider, LARSO director. “The seniors who come that night to serve, welcome and support the event; people we work with regularly, like Los Alamos Retirement Community and the Medical Center, are very supportive of the event and they have kitchens with creative chefs who are happy to donate chocolate treats for our festival.”
    Through the efforts of Los Alamos MainStreet and a variety of local business, the long-term tradition of the Festival of Chocolate will kick off a weeklong event called, The Festival of Trees.
    Holiday trees, available by silent auction are unveiled annually during the Festival of Chocolate, when the bid sheets officially go up and Chef Michael Mason’s homemade hot cocoa begins to pour.

  • For several years, the Los Alamos Photography Club has offered a place for photography enthusiasts to not only learn more about photo techniques, but to also hone their skills.  
    Now, there’s another group that will help photographers take the next step and learn about Adobe products and digital photo processing. The Adobe Users Group, founded by Doug Coombs and Kenneth Hanson, will focus on the program Adobe Lightroom, as well as Adobe Photoshop and Photoshop elements.
    The group is currently accepting new members and will meet from 7-9 p.m. at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, the first Tuesday of every month, with the first meeting scheduled for Nov. 6. There is no charge to join the group.
    Coombs said putting the group together is a joint effort between the Los Alamos Photography Club and the Los Alamos Adobe Users Group.
    Although the two groups focus on photography and photo techniques, Coombs wants everyone to know that they are separate.
    “The (photo) club is more software agnostic. We focus on how to do photos and print photos,” Coombs said. Despite the fact that his time will now be divided amongst the two groups, he said that the photo club still intends to host the annual photo show.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    DOGS
    Autumn — This spayed female is one of those rare breeds that doesn’t come around very often — a New Mexico Brown Dog. She is housebroken and leash-trained, just don’t try to force her to be friends with any dog smaller than her.
    Axle — Axle is a playful and affectionate neutered male. The shelter temperament testers describe this Pit-mix as a total sweetheart. He would love a family that appreciates big, sloppy dog kisses.
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.

  • Santa Fe Enchantment, the 2012 national seminar of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, will bring more than 600 needlework enthusiasts from across the country to Buffalo Thunder Resort in Pojoaque through Friday.
    Participants will attend classes in all facets of needle arts.
    While registration for the seminar is now closed, the public is invited to visit Buffalo Thunder to view a display of needlework done by masters and award winners in various embroidery techniques.
    The national tapestry “America the Beautiful” will also be shown. EGA stitchers from around the country contributed designs representative of their area.
    During the seminar, the Needlework Boutique will offer a wide variety of threads, patterns, notions, accessories and gadgets for sale. Books about all phases of needlework will be available at the bookstore.
    The EGA seminar provides an opportunity to see the finest in needle arts and shop for hard-to-find stitching accessories.
    For more information, contact Marilyn Foster, 672-9404.

  • The ladies of the Xi Nu chapter of Beta Sigma Phi look good for 25, that is 25 years of craft fairs.
    Their silver anniversary takes place Saturday, with their 25th annual craft fair at Crossroads Bible Church, located near the Los Alamos Airport.
    The 9 a.m.-3 p.m. event will have shoppers glowing in the warmth of shopping locally and helping small-based businesses as the holiday season approaches.
    This year, the ladies, under the direction of Cathy Shisler, have more than 50 booths lined up.
    Breakfast and lunch items will be available for purchase with the help of Kenny’s North Carolina Barbecue, along with coffee, fresh baked goods and a few healthy items thrown in, compliments of the sorority members.
    Perhaps the best value of the day is the $1 raffle ticket or six tickets for $5 that gives shoppers (even those not present) the chance to win one of more than 50 items contributed by vendors.
    Of course the most prized item of the day is a handmade quilt, by Xi Nu member Alice Garcia that has been in the works for a year and a half. The hand made quilt is in celebration of their silver anniversary and reflects silver nods throughout the slightly-larger-than-king-sized artistic snowman endeavor.

  • The Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge, located on Hwy. 281, just east of Las Vegas, will be open each Sunday in November from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. for the Traditional Annual Fall Flight Festival featuring a 4-1/2 mile self-guided auto drive.
    This tour allows visitors to enjoy the short-grass prairie in areas of the refuge that are not open for general public use the rest of the year.
    Visitors can observe directly the impact of current drought conditions on ponds, lakes, marshes and fields. With the lack of water, migrating waterfowl will be limited, but numerous grassland birds such as mountain bluebirds, meadowlarks, horned larks and sparrows along with various wintering raptors will be visible.
    Volunteer roving naturalists will be on hand with spotting scopes to help visitors identify birds. No walking is required. Attendees are encouraged to bird from or close to their vehicle, so birds will not be disturbed. All events at the refuge are free.
    Special Wildlife Kids Crafts, featuring a different themed craft are held each Sunday between 1-3 p.m.
    Interpretive programs are repeated at noon and 1:30 p.m. each Sunday:
    Sunday:  “Live Raptor Presentation” By Santa Fe Raptor Center. This program is ideal for children.

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offer the first in a series of three classes on travel and nature journaling taught by Terry Foxx, Katy Korkos and Fairley Barnes Nov. 6.
    The class is on three consecutive Tuesdays from 6-8 p.m., and costs $40 for PEEC members and $50 for all others.
    This price includes all supplies and materials for the three sessions.
    Many are looking for ways to connect with the world through travel or through observing nature.  When traveling, people pack their suitcase with a notebook intended to be a journal.
    The first one or two nights, they are judicious in writing notes, then life overtakes them and they come home with a blank notebook. Or they go on a walk, something catches their eye and they want to remember. But they say to themselves, “I’m not an artist” and they tuck the experience away in memory that soon fades.
    But there is a more permanent way to record explorations. Korkos, Barnes and Foxx will share ways to record observations, feelings,and experiences in a variety of journal types that are simple, easily done and don’t require a mastery of art.
    For more information and to register, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Aspen Lounge, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — sanitizer didn’t have solution made. One cap of bleach per one gallon of warm water. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Hilltop House Convenience Store, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Los Alamos Holiday Inn Express, 60 Entrada Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: Three high-risk violations, two for improper holding — milk, refrigerator needs to be turned down. Corrected; eggs without shell at 45 degrees, corrected, thrown out; sausage at 170 degrees, corrected and thrown out. Food handler said she turned off warmer over half an hour ago, since no customers. One for poor personal hygiene — hand wash sink needs paper towels. Corrected.
    Notes: Milk display refrigerator needs temperature turned down. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Santa Fe

    Classic Fare and Catering

  • Finding a decent Northern New Mexican meal on the Hill is not an easy task. In fact, it’s nearly impossible.
    Yes, there are restaurants that churn out Northern New Mexican food, but there’s always something missing.
    Sometimes the dishes lack flavor and sometimes the chile is no more than bland chile water. There’s no heat and there’s no flavor. Until now.
    DeColores Restaurant has been at the same location for years. It’s on the edge of town, so it’s sometimes forgotten. But it’s well worth your while to have a meal or two there.
    On a recent Thursday evening, the restaurant was practically empty.
    A singer/guitarist entertained the handful of patrons scattered about the dining area.
    One look at the menu and it was evident that things had changed.
    The prices had gone up slightly, but there was also a lot more to choose from.
    In addition to the traditional Northern New Mexican fare, the restaurant also offers a variety of hamburgers, salads and other items.
    It was hard to make a decision about what to order, but the waitress was patient, coming back a couple of times before a decision was made.
    In the meantime, free chips and salsa were offered to munch away on as the menu was browsed. The chips were good.

  • The Dia de los Muertos show at Northern New Mexico College has become an annual tradition.
    Now in its fourth year, the show will once again feature 16 artists from Northern New Mexico and beyond, displaying their best interpretations of the Day of the Dead. The man behind the show is Española’s Toby Morfin. For the past few years, Morfin has curated the show, all in an effort to share his — and other artists’ — talent with valley residents and those from surrounding areas. This year, Española artist Cruz Lopez also helped curate the show.
    The type of work displayed is as varied as the artists that create it. A good portion of the artists have done the show before, but there are also some new faces this year. Rachel Montoya is one of the newbies. Montoya, a jewelry artist, collaborated with Arturo Montaño for this exhibit. But she’s no stranger to exhibiting her work. In fact, she won first place for jewelry at this year’s Spanish Market.
    “It’s nice to add her to the show,” Morfin said. He said the show continues to improve each year and has attracted a big audience.

  • As Director of the Betty Ehart Senior Center and as a music therapist, Pauline Schneider sees both the difficulties dementia sufferers and their caregivers face daily and also how music and the arts can help people connect and enjoy the  arts’ effects.
    “I have worked with people in all phases of dementia and even those who seem to have stopped relating to the world around them, remarkably respond to music. One person, who hadn’t spoken for quite some time, began to sing along with a familiar tune from decades ago and knew all the words, stayed on key and stayed focused until it was over,” Schneider said.
    She invited Mary Yamada of the Los Alamos Retirement Community, who has worked with people with dementia for 15 years and Carol Meine of Mesa Public Library arts programming, to get together and create a pilot program for people with dementia and their caregivers to meet in a non-clinical setting to enjoy the arts together.

  • Carole Rinard, a local needlework master, received the Gold Thread Award on Oct. 28 at the 2012 national seminar of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, at Buffalo Thunder Resort in Pojoaque.
    This annual award is given to individuals who have given freely of their time and talents to best exemplify the EGA mission of fostering the highest standards of excellence in the practice of the art of embroidery. Carole is being honored at both the regional and national level for her life-long dedication to fiber arts.
    Upon moving to Los Alamos in 1981, Rinard immediately became active in the Embroiderers Guild at the local, regional and national levels.
    She received the Rocky Mountain Region’s first Clare Award in 1989 for outstanding service to the region. In 2004, she was the chairperson of the EGA 18th National Exhibit, which opened in Los Alamos in April of that year. As an EGA Master Needlework Judge, she has judged fiber arts at venues throughout the country.
    Rinard has exhibited widely and won awards for her needlework in Kansas and New Mexico. In 1995, she was one of 100 EGA needle artists to be selected to stitch an ornament for the White House’s Blue Room Christmas Tree.
    The ornament “New Fallen Snow at the Santa Fe Opera” is in the permanent collection of the Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C.