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Features

  • Mackenzie Wehner was the guest speaker at a recent Rotary Club meeting, received a $27,000 Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarship for a year of academic study at Cambridge University, England. Wehner’s scholarship is sponsored by the Rotary Club of Los Alamos under the auspices of Rotary District 5520, which encompasses all of New Mexico and West Texas.
    Wehner, who was born and raised in Los Alamos, graduated from LAHS in 2004. She is the daughter of Tom Wehner and Barbara Lange, now of Santa Fe.  
    Wehner earned a bachelor’s degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale and has completed three of four years of medical school at Stanford University.

  • I have a pouty lip as I write this week’s column, and there’s a good reason for it. The end of the month marks the end of assets month, which started at the beginning of August, with the help of the Los Alamos County Council.
    I will soon contact council to see what they have done to help spread the assets message, because the winner will receive baked goods from the “assets kitchen.”
    You see, we work pretty hard trying to get the asset message across, trying to tie it into pre-existing programs and projects and trying to teach people how to work it into the course of their day.
    It is the big impact events that help to get the word out, but the little things you do daily keeps it going.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Pardon our construction. We are installing solar hot water, so the shelter has been closed to prevent accidents. If you need some help, call a volunteers at 412-3451.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.

  • Champion golfer Phil Mickelson, his wife Amy and ExxonMobil are sponsoring a free math and science camp for teachers called, “Send My Teacher.”
    The program is a week long professional development program focused on math and science education. Since 2005, more than 3,200 teachers have attended the all-expenses paid workshop. Teachers from all 50 states have attended.
     The deadline for teachers to be nominated to go to the 2012 Mickelson ExxonMobil Teachers Academy next summer is Oct. 31.
    Students or parents can nominate a teacher, and the teacher just has to fill out the application. If selected, they will be a part of the 2011 Mickelson ExxonMobil Teachers Academy.

  • Young people ages 8-17 will have a chance to take to the skies Sept. 5 as the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 691 hosts a Young Eagles Flight Rally at Los Alamos County Airport.
    The rally is part of the EAA Young Eagles Program, created to interest young people in aviation.  Since the program was launched in 1992, volunteer EAA pilots have flown more than 1.4 million young people in more than 90 countries.
    Young people are given the opportunity to discover how airplanes work and observe how pilots inspect their planes to help ensure that safety is the primary concern before every flight. Following the 15-20 minute flight, each person will receive a certificate making them an official Young Eagle.

  • The Los Alamos Historical Museum announces a new cooperative Exhibition Opening initiative with the Fuller Lodge Art Center and a kickoff collaborative evening celebration.
    The public is invited to visit the Historical Museum from 4-6 p.m. Sept. 2, for “Pre-Statehood Maps of New Mexico,” an exhibit featuring artistic and historically curious maps from the 1600s to 1909, with New Mexico seen in a variety of uncommon configurations.
    From 5-7 p.m. the Fuller Lodge Art Center will present the opening of “Umi Raby,” a one-person show of contemporary art.

  • The Los Alamos American Association of University Women will start its program year with a fall brunch from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sept. 10 at the Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 2390 North Road.
    The AAUW is an organization of college-educated women. The programs of the organization include gender equity, help for women in the workplace and  legislative initiatives concerning women’s issues. \Members attending will bring a dish to share.
    The featured speaker will be Helena Whyte, who will talk about her experiences at the AAUW National Convention in Washington D.C. this summer.

    From a press release

  • The League of Women Voter’s Lunch with a Leader will be at 11:45 a.m. Sept. 8 at Central Avenue Grill. The guest speaker will be Los Alamos County Environmental Services Specialist Tom Nagawiecki.
    Nagawiecki coordinates public education and outreach for Environmental Services’ comprehensive waste and recycling programs that are provided to residents and the business community.
    His other duties include leading the county’s sustainability initiative, which is focused on reducing the environmental impact of  county operations in addition to educating the community about their role in the effort.

  • Combine six cups of clay, six cups of compost and a cup of wild land seeds and the result is the community at its finest.
    It is nice when a plan comes together, and last weekend a lot of planning paid off for the community and one youth in particular.
    Los Alamos High School senior Jin Park rallied the community, along with funds and supplies to pull off a day of playing in the mud that will rival any other, for what the community hopes is a once-in-a-lifetime event.
    On Aug. 20, almost 600 citizens came together to assist Park and Los Alamos County employee Craig Martin, in a seed ball project that will aid re-forestation efforts for the surrounding community affected by the Las Conchas Fire.

  • ALBUQUERQUE — For more than five decades, the spirit behind the Santa Fe Opera has stemmed from a commitment to commissioning new works and presenting rare productions that had never been seen or heard in the United States.
    Now, with its international reputation and location in the shadow of northern New Mexico’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the opera continues to make good on its commitment with two new commissions and an American premiere despite the ongoing economic stranglehold that has brought some of the arts community to its knees.
    General director Charles MacKay says that means visitors to the outdoor venue will be treated to new performances for at least the next four years.

  • During the two years (2006-2008) that the exhibit, “Spider Woman’s (Na ashje’ii ‘Asdzáá) Gift: Navajo Weaving Traditions” was at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, there were numerous requests for a catalogue.
    “Spider Woman’s Gift: Nineteenth Century Diné Textiles” is a response to that interest. Images from the exhibit’s classical Navajo (Diné) weavings illustrate illuminating essays by Joyce Begay-Foss and Marian E. Rodee.

  • A free family fishing clinic at Fenton Lake is being offered by Pajarito Environmental Education Center,  from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday.  
    The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish fishing skills instructor Ti Piper will teach the clinic. Fishing gear will be provided for those who have never fished or want to try a new type of fishing.
    Participants 12 and older will need to have a fishing license, and the vehicle entry fee to Fenton Lake is $5.
    The fishing clinic is geared toward all skill levels — from beginner to experienced — and will teach different kinds of fishing — bait, lure and fly. At noon there will be special fly-casting lessons.

  • As a celebration of creativity that crosses boundaries, and in conjunction with the Next Big Idea festival, Mesa Public Library will show Jack Ox’s intermedia painting in the Upstairs Art Gallery. A public reception will be from 4-5:45 p.m. Sept. 17.
    In today’s fluid world, definitions, perceptions and forms of expression are blurring: what is art, what is science, what is music? Or, can they intermingle, creating new forms? Ox has done just that with her vast, segmented painting, a visualization of a musical work by Kurt Schwitters, a groundbreaking artist who worked in multimedia in the 1930s. He is generally acknowledged as the 20th century’s greatest master of collage and installation art.

  • Casual observers and avid bird watchers might find Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Birdscape Tour interesting. The event will be from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 10
    The tour will give bird enthusiasts an opportunity to see how four Los Alamos residents design their yards to attract wild birds and learn their secrets, which is sure to give them take home ideas for attracting birds to their yards.
    Beside the simple enjoyment that watching birds provides, attracting avian friends has other benefits.  Many birds eat a variety of insects that are considered pests, including mosquitoes, aphids and bark beetles. Hummingbirds and other species are important pollinators as they go from flower to flower, sipping nectar.

  • Los Alamos High School football players attended the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series last week, during which they were introduced to the community by their coach Garett Williams.

  • Virginia Scharff will sign her history, “The Women Jefferson Loved,” from noon-2 p.m. Thursday at Otowi Station Bookstore.
    In the tradition of Annette Gordon-Reed’s “The Hemingses of Monticello” and David McCullough’s “John Adams,” Scharff offers a multi-generational biography revealing how the women Thomas Jefferson loved shaped the third president’s ideas and his vision for the nation.
    Throughout his life, Jefferson constructed a seemingly impenetrable wall between his public legacy and his private life, a tradition upheld by his family and his white male biographers.

  • Following the sell-out success of the first annual High Tea and Fashion Show last year, the House of Hope ladies’ mission team invites the community to join them again this year for a tea, followed by a fashion show.
    The afternoon’s activities are intended to raise funds for house building mission trips to Juárez, Mexico.
    This year’s event will kick off at 2:30 p.m. Aug. 27 in Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Dr.  
    For the past five years, House of Hope has raised money to fund their annual trips Juárez, where Los Alamos women have built houses for the needy.

  • Get on the bus! Last week, I rode the Atomic City Bus.
    I’m embarrassed to say, it was my first time. There was no particular reason for not riding the bus, it is just that I’m usually hauling lots of kids or stuff whenever I go uptown.
    I have no trouble talking to people or asking directions and I’ve certainly been on a bus, we just called it “the city bus,” in Orlando, Fla.
    How does riding the bus relate to assets?
    I was waiting to ride the bus, not having that be part of my plan to do so that day.
    I stood at the little marker awaiting my chariot, not nervous, but pondering what question I needed to ask to arrive in White Rock before the school bell rang.

  • Aspen Elementary students shared joy and sorrow as they finished off the first week of school.
    Principal Kathryn Vandenkieboom welcomed new students and a new librarian, Lisa LaPrairie-Whitacre, to the Tiger home.
    “Lisa brings a wide view of what a library is and can provide for Aspen students. We are so lucky to have her.” Vandenkieboom said. “She is making the library the heart of our school.”
    LaPrarie-Whitacre spent many hours this summer weeding, rearranging and cataloging new books to prepare to meet her new flock of readers last week. Then came the rain.
    According to Vandenkieboom, water flowed in through the windows, onto the tops of the bookshelves, and down four bookshelves, soaking the carpet.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Pardon our construction. We are installing solar hot water, so the shelter has been closed to prevent accidents. If you need some help, call a volunteers at 412-3451.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.