.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home! Dogs and cats are great at chasing away the blues as the nights get longer, so come adopt a new friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptables:

    petfinder.com/shelters/
    friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Monday – Friday noon to 6 p.m. and weekends 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

  • For more than 50 years, Los Alamos Chapter No. 63, Order of Eastern Star, has sold Collin Street Bakery holiday fruitcakes in Los Alamos.
    This year the chapter will continue that tradition by selling fruitcakes, as well as apricot pecan and pineapple pecan cakes, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (or until sold out) Dec. 13, in the Los Alamos National Bank lobby in Los Alamos.
    The last sale date is 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 20. Contact Judy Goldie, 662-3797/judygoldie1@gmail.com, or Nina Laird, 662-7580 for more information. 

  • Nature Center Coordinator Beth Cortright and Kaya Loy, 8, color in the $10K mark on the “Bearometer” Wednesday at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. The annual Fund Drive will continue until Dec. 31 with the hopes to raise $15K.

  • “The Strange Disappearance of Uncle Dudley: A Child’s Story of Los Alamos” by Inez Ross has been reissued just in time for the holidays.
    The year was 1943 and the major nations of the world were embroiled in global warfare. Many of the top scientists of the world were being spirited off to a secret place to work on a project that would help end the war and change the world forever.
    “The Strange Disappearance of Uncle Dudley,” is the story of wartime absence of loved ones, told from a family perspective in a Read-It-To-Me book for children. It features archival and modern photos of Los Alamos.
    In the early 1990s, the Los Alamos Writer’s Group had summoned Lore Watt, head of Los Alamos Historical Society Publishers, to talk about the publishing process and what kinds of books the society would publish. At that time, Lore said, there were no stories for children about Los Alamos and its part in bringing World War II to an end.
    Inez Ross, LAWG member, had an idea and presented a mock-up and outline to Watt who approved it and said she would submit it to the publishing committee for approval. But Watt was stricken with cancer and the project was delayed. Colleen Olinger, owner of the Otowi Station Book Store and Otowi Crossing Press, offered to publish the book.

  •  S.F. Film Fest rated ‘coolest’

    Santa Fe Independent Film Festival Named One of MovieMaker Magazine’s coolest film festivals on the planet. Santa Fe Independent Film Festival  has been named one of “MovieMaker Magazine’s Coolest Film Festivals on the Planet.”
    SFIFF has made the list of the top 25 coolest general film festivals on the planet, and will be covered in this month’s issue of Moviemaker magazine alongside Tribeca film Festival and San Francisco international film Festival. The issue hit stands this month.
    Having just closed the curtain on the fifth annual Santa Fe Independent Film Festival, hosted more than eight thousand attendees that were treated to films such as “Tapia” and “Go For Sisters” along with a writing lab with Joan Torres (writer of “Blackula”).  

    ‘Koats for Kids’ in full swing

  • Española

    Advantage Sweets/Baskin Robbins, 1111 Riverside Drive
    Date inspected: Nov. 4
    Violations: Four moderate-risk violations. Tips on the Shur-shot dispenser need cleaning. Cutting boards need replacing. Hanging thermometer needed in walk-in and an upright in the cake freezer. Wrong test kits for sanitizer were replaced at the time of inspection. Grill and vent covers on the display freezer need repair because of safety issue.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Española Valley Nursing and Rehab Center, 720 E. Hacienda
    Date inspected: Nov. 4
    Violations: One moderate-risk violation. Pans hanging on rack are past their service life and crusted with grease. One low-risk violation. Walls need cleaning.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Jo Ji’s Sushi and Teppan Grill, 1508 N. Riverside Drive
    Date inspected: Nov. 13
    Violations: One high-risk violation. Shrimp in refrigerator holding at improper temperature, which was corrected during inspection. Chicken, shrimp and beef need to be labeled if repacked and frozen.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

  • Los Alamos will bring the holiday season to light with a number of festive events this weekend.

    • The Affordable Art Sale at the Fuller Lodge Art Center is in full swing and will last until Jan. 4. This is a great opportunity to start holiday shopping, with art created by local and regional artists and affordably priced at $250 and under. Call 662-1735 or go to fullerlodgeartcenter.com for more information.



    • “The Nutcracker” at Duane Smith Auditorium, Thursday through Saturday — The holidays in Los Alamos wouldn’t be complete without a performance of this classic holiday favorite. Now in its 16th year, the Nutcracker will feature professionally trained local dancers between ages 5 and 18. Performances are scheduled 6 and 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 2 p.m., Saturday and Sunday at the Duane Smith Auditorium. Guest artists from Houston Ballet II, Washington Ballet, Youth America Ballet, and Ellison Ballet Professional Training Program will also grace the stage. “The Nutcracker” is presented by Dance Arts Los Alamos. Visit danceartslosalamos.org for details.

  • Michaelle Sutton checks out the many things the middle school library has to offer. Books are available for adults, teens and young children, as well as posters, pencils and more.
    Los Alamos Middle School is hosting a Book Fair this week, with special hours on Thursday evening. Tours will be given on Thursday from 4-7 p.m. for community members that would like to see the new building. The holidays are the perfect time to give the gift of reading and the LAMS book fair has gifts for all ages. Regular book fair hours are: 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. today, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday.
    Volunteer slots are also available anytime between 7:30 to 10 a.m. To learn more, call Lisa Whitacre at 663-2391. 

  • Shop on the Corner’s annual Christmas Sale is a Los Alamos holiday tradition. The well-attended thrift shop sale attracts bargain hunters, collectors and hobbyists from throughout Northern New Mexico.
    The Christmas Sale features hundreds of new and gently used items, which the volunteer staff set aside all year. Holiday decorations, festive and new clothing, toys and games, books and music, linens, china and glassware, jewelry, leather goods and gifts are some of the featured items.
    The sale will be from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday. Shop on the Corner is located on the lower level of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, off Canyon Road near the corner of Diamond Drive.
    Scores of shoppers attend the Christmas Sale each year, where they can purchase items to trim a tree, decorate a home, dress for the holidays and find gifts and stocking stuffers for everyone on their list at thrift store prices.
    Shop on the Corner has been a Los Alamos fixture for more than four decades.
    The thrift store’s mission is to help Los Alamos County residents recycle their usable clothing and household items; to provide an inexpensive market for the Northern New Mexico community to purchase these items on a budget; and to use the proceeds to donate to local and regional charities and other worthy causes.

  • Positive Identity kicks off the Asset building month of December. It will carry over into January too, so we will dive a little deeper, as we wade through this category.
    The positive identity category encapsulates assets 37 through 40 and are labeled as follows:
    37. Personal power — This is when a young person feels he or she has control over “things that happen to me.”
    38.Self-esteem — Young person reports having a high self-esteem.
    39. Sense of purpose — This is when a young person reports that “my life has a purpose.”
    40. Positive view of personal future — This is when a young person is optimistic about her or his personal future.
    This month, it is easy to demonstrate all levels of caring, for family for friends and for those in need. A good portion of your identity can be wrapped up in how you treat others and in turn, how they treat you.
    It is important for our youth to see adults model the ability to have a positive identity too and it can be equally hard not to show a sense of identity wrapped up in buying the latest purse the newest pair of headphones, or having the latest this or that.

  • On Nov. 1, the Los Alamos High School Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) unit hosted the Micah Jay Andersen Shoulder to Shoulder and Brain Brawl Competition. This event was the first of its kind in Area 9, which includes seven states and 60 schools.
    The Los Alamos unit named the competition after a former cadet and LAHS graduate who was injured in Afghanistan by an IED and is now recovering in San Antonio, Texas.
    The competition was in the ROTC building at the high school and had six competing schools, including West Mesa High, Santa Fe High, Belen High, Montrose High, Cleveland Academy and Rio Rancho High.
    Cadets were asked questions of military history, chain of command, and other military related topics.
    During the competition, a new buzzer system, which used wireless buttons that ring in everyone who responded in order and keeps track of the score.
    The Los Alamos cadets helped with the parking, campus tours, guiding schools around, and planning the event. In the end, the overall winner was Rio Rancho High School.  

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home! Dogs and cats are great at chasing away the blues as the nights get longer, so come adopt a new friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of adorable adoptables:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

  • For more than 50 years, Los Alamos Chapter No. 63, Order of Eastern Star, has sold Collin Street Bakery holiday fruitcakes in Los Alamos.
    This year, the chapter will continue that tradition by selling fruitcakes, as well as apricot pecan and pineapple pecan cakes, from 2-5 p.m. Dec. 5, in the Los Alamos National Bank lobby in Los Alamos.
    Future sale dates are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Fridays, Dec. 13 and 20. Contact Judy Goldie, 662-3797/judygoldie1@gmail.com or Nina Laird, 662-7580 for more information.  

  • One of the 20 “Best Small Towns to Visit” (Smithsonian Magazine, May 2013), Los Alamos is also one of the best places in New Mexico to bring the holiday season to light with a number of festive events.
    • The Affordable Art Sale at the Fuller Lodge Art Center is in full swing and will last until Jan. 4. This is a great opportunity to start holiday shopping, with art created by local and regional artists and affordably priced at $250 and under. Call 662-1735 or go to fullerlodgeartcenter.com for more information.


    • On Saturday, shop at participating small businesses in Los Alamos during Small Business Saturday in Downtown Los Alamos. Participating businesses will donate five percent of all sales to support the local United Way of New Mexico. The goal of Small Business Saturday is to encourage the community and visitors to shop local. Participating businesses will also offer special promotions.
    Winterfest officially begins Dec. 6-8 and events include:

  • Esta Lee Albright is an integral part of the team at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.

    She started volunteering for PEEC in 2006, after moving to Los Alamos from Monterey, Calif. Initially, Albright worked mainly with the animal exhibits, and later she took over the task of editing Nature Notes, PEEC’s quarterly newsletter.

    Albright had been on the board of the Monterey Bay Chapter of the American Cetacean Society and worked part time for 25 years as a whale watch naturalist, but she said she wanted to learn about mountains and canyons. “I wandered in when Chick Keller was covering the nature center, and he gave my daughter Heather and me a first-class tour,” Albright said in an interview with PEEC. “I wanted to know how I could volunteer, and I became a member of the Board for two years. I tried to learn fast.”

    She first began volunteering to care for the live animal exhibits. In Monterey, she was a “surrogate mom” for orphan sea otter pups in the Monterey Bay Aquarium, she said she enjoys relating wildlife with their habitats.

  • New or like new items are needed for the Children’s Christmas Bazaar from 9 a.m. to noon Dec. 7 at Trinity on the Hill Espiscopal Church. The success of the event relies on the community.

    Donations running below average this year. Some suggested items to donate are:
    • CDs and DVDs
    • Unopened lotions, perfume, soap, bubble bath
    • Dolls, stuffed animals, action figures, baby toys
    • Books, Journals, stationery
    • Games, cards, puzzles, craft kits
    • Mugs, teacups, coffee cups, knick knacks
    • Jewelry
    • Belts, neckties, wallets, handkerchiefs, gadgets, key chains (especially gifts for men)
    • Ornaments and Christmas decorations
    • Scarves, handkerchiefs, slippers, gloves, mittens, hats
    • Kitchen items:  Trivits, dish towels, cookbooks
    • Stationary, figurines, photo frames
    • Small items that fit into a lunch bag

    Items may be dropped off at the south entrance to Trinity on the Hill (across from the hospital), using the entrance off 39th street. A collection box is available  inside the door. 

  • The 18th annual Fall Food Drive was on Nov. 23 in Los Alamos and White Rock.

    The community food drive was jointly conducted by the Los Alamos Letter Carriers Union (NALC-4112), the Northern New Mexico District of the Boy Scouts of America, and L.A. Cares with the support of the National Letter Carriers Union, the United States Postal Service, the Knights of Columbus, Smith’s Food and Drug Stores, RE/MAX and many individual volunteers. The drive supports those in need in Los Alamos and Rio Arriba Counties through regular distributions by L.A. Cares and the San Martin de Porres Soup Kitchen in Española.

    Residents placed non-perishable donations of food and supplies near their mailboxes by 10 a.m. Nov. 23 for pick-up by letter carriers, scouts, and volunteers. Cub Scouts collected donations at both Smith’s Supermarket locations in Los Alamos and White Rock all day that day. 

  • Art exhibits
    Ron Barsano: The Naked Truth. A Retrospective Exhibition. On display until Jan. 5 at the Taos Art Museum. For more information about museum hours and events, contact to Ellen Rink at 575-758-2690.

  • The 11th Annual Children’s Christmas Bazaar will be open to the community from 9 a.m. to noon Dec. 7 at Trinity on the Hill. It is for children from kindergarten though sixth grade.

    Parishioners from the church, and as well as members of the community may donate new, or very gently used gift type items. Members of the church will sort, price and set up the day before the Bazaar.

    Prices range from 50 cents to $5. The higher priced items would typically be things we don’t really want to “give away,” and if they don’t sell they would go to the Trinity on the Hill thrift shop, the proceeds of which all go to outreach ministries.

    The morning of the sale, kids will gather at the greeting area with a list of up to 10 people for whom they wish to purchase gifts and are given a shopping bag. The purchases are then selected and paid for and everything is gift wrapped for free.

    Meanwhile all parents go to another part of the church for fellowship, drinks and holiday treats.  There will be activities in the greeting area for pre-kindergarten children. 

    Shoppers who are hesitant to go around by themselves may have a helper — or “Elf” to assist them. 

  • Santa Fe
    New York Deli, 420 Catron St.
    Date inspected: Nov. 13
    Violations: Seven high-risk violations. Walk-in refrigerator and cooling unit will not drain. Wet rag out of sanitizer bucket. Wet rags and ice in hand washing station. No soap at hand washing station. Employees had bare hand contact with ready to eat food. Chemicals stored next to dry storage area. Ice scoop stored incorrectly and have grime build up. Cutting board and dishwashing trays have grime build up on them. Two moderate-risk violations. Dust build up on food equipment. Fan in walk-in cooler and shades have dust and grime build up. One low-risk violation. Restroom doors need to be made self-closing.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up required in one week.