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Features

  • The Harwood Museum of Art in Taos is hosting a number of art, educational, and cultural activities for all ages to kicked off the spring season this weekend, with a panel discussion of contemporary art in Northern New Mexico, and continuing through April 18 with a jazz concert.
    “We’re thrilled that we could offer the community our popular children’s education programs, lectures, films, and musical presentations,” said director of public programs, Rebecca Aubin. “Many of these events give us an opportunity to showcase our state-of-the-art Arthur Bell Auditorium. These programs have been gaining popularity throughout the years and we plan on continuing with this growing tradition. We want the community to know that the Harwood Museum of Art is the place to come in Taos for all your art, learning, history and cultural experiences.”
    The events were kicked off by artists Jonathan Blaustein, Nina Elder and Debbie Long, who focused on contemporary art in Northern New Mexico during a panel discussion. Their work is currently on display, which demonstrates a new trend in how artists are using their art as a medium to talk about planet earth and regional landscapes.

  • Welcome to April, the Asset category of Constructive use of time and a way past due time for spring break.
    This category incorporates numbers 17 through 20 and includes creative activities, youth programs, the religious community and time at home.
    Now for those that know me well, spring break is a time for staying in your pajamas as late as possible, scheduling a whole lot of nothing, eating dinner in front of the television and one of those dinners possibly being comprised of all appetizers.
    I also recommend a healthy amount of baking, making ice cream sundaes, or going through a drive-thru, again in your pajamas for some sort of sweet treat, late at night.
    The theme here is a whole lot of nothing that can still equal a whole lot of fun. Parents and their children need to be able to embrace times where every little detail isn’t scheduled out to the very last minute.
    Throughout the month, we will look at the following assets and how constructive use of time is important, but you can also be constructive doodling on construction paper and mailing cards to our troops, or local home bound seniors who could use a kind word.
    Here is a look at the entire category.
    17. Creative activities — A young person spends three or more hours per week in lessons or practice in music, theater, or other arts.

  • Pony Club graduate and instructor Lindsay Lechner performs in a dressage show. The Los Alamos Pony Club show and rally helps participants improve their horsemanship and teamwork skills.

  • The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta board of directors and staff are conducting the first “Oh Say Can You Sing” National Anthem Contest. Singers, entertainers and performers are invited to submit their best National Anthem audition video online.
    Balloon Fiesta staff will choose the top 15, then the top nine will be selected by votes cast by Balloon Fiesta Facebook fans.
    The winners of the “Oh Say Can You Sing” contest will sing the National Anthem at Balloon Fiesta Park’s Main Stage during the 2014 event morning sessions October 4-12, 2014.
    Video auditions are being accepted until April 11. To enter visit: balloonfiesta.com/event-info/oh-say-can-you-sing.
    To submit audition:
    • Upload your video to YouTube or Vimeo.
    • Complete the online application and include the link to your video audition.
    • Visit BalloonFiesta.com on April 18 to see if you are a finalist. 

  • Five students from Los Alamos Middle School participated in the recent National History Day regional competitions and each one placed in his or her category! All five students are moving on to compete again at the statewide competition to be April 25 in Albuquerque.
    The National History Day competitions allow several different types of entries including websites, documentaries, papers, performances, or exhibits. Each entry is thoroughly researched and reflects the theme this year, which is “Rights and Responsibilities in History.”
    Thomas Chadwick, Zoe Hemez, and Miriam Wallstrom traveled to Farmington to compete in the Northern New Mexico region in February. Chadwick took first place with his website on D-Day, Hemez took third place with her website on the making of the atomic bomb, and Wallstrom took first place with her documentary on the Women Air Force Service Pilots (WASPs) of World War II.
    Antonio Dowdy and Ruby Selvage competed in the Central New Mexico region in Albuquerque in March. Dowdy placed second with his paper on the American concentration camps, and Selvage took first with her exhibit on animal rights.

  • The Los Alamos High School NJROTC precision air rifle team took first place for Navy in the National JROTC Championships last week at Camp Perry, Ohio.
    Shooters Tessa Snyder, Noah Marriott, David Murphy and JoAnna O’Neill, along with their coach Lieutenant Commander Wes Shumaker placed ninth overall in the three-day event.
    On the first day, the team checked in and practiced. The following two days were record fire with a 3 x 20 (20 shots record fire in the prone, standing and kneeling positions).
    After the first practice session, it was determined that the rifle belonging to Snyder needed a rebuild as the air seals were wearing out. The rifle was brought to the firing line the next morning just as the preparation for the first day record firing period began.
    Snyder shot a 580 the first day and followed up with a 581 the second day for the team high scorer with overall score of 1161.
    After the first day, the team trailed the high Navy team by a few points. Los Alamos picked up the pace on day two and finished as the high Navy team and ninth overall. Marriott hit the groove with a personal best 579 on day two and an 1,149 total, followed closely by O’Neill with an 1,148. With Murphy improving on day two for an 1,128 total, the team pulled ahead of New Albany, Ind., to take over the high Navy team position.

  • Antonio Maggiore, a 1995 Los Alamos High School graduate, will speak April 7 for the monthly meeting of the Summit Garden Club.
    His topic will be “Getting away from zeroscaping: the evils of gravel and gardening for good.”
    Maggiore, who established Ecolutions seven years ago, believes that “with a minimal amount of work, it is possible to bring beauty into people’s workplace and life in general.”
    Examples of his work can be seen at Sombrillo, Aspen Ridge and Oppenheimer Place. There his aim was to transform the transition areas — the land between the landscape plantings and the canyons.
    First, he cleaned out debris, then cut down the Siberian Elms, and laid the branches down in order to trap moisture for the pine. His intent was to mimic nature, by encouraging the mycelium layer below the ground. He shaped trees so that water below their driplines would be taken up by shrubs, such as currants, sumac and privets.
    He improved drainage by changing land contours and thus slowing the water down and having it infiltrate the soil.
    Maggiore has designed and executed permaculture projects throughout the state, and can be reached at 577-4123, or at ecolutionsllc@gmail.com.
    For more information, including time of meeting, call Laurie at 672-3483. 

  • Los Alamos High School Senior Tessa Snyder rallied 170 members of the community Thursday for the documentary showing of “Race To Nowhere.” The film showing will be followed up with a challenge for change in late April. Snyder along with mentor Margo Batha plan to offer additional opportunities to view the film prior to the April call to action.
     

  • Another Empty Bowls Success

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS

  • Friends of the Shelter will participate in this month’s Posse Lodge Pancake Breakfast from 7-11 a.m. April 6. All proceeds for the breakfast will benefit Los Alamos’ Friends of the Shelter.
    The public will also have an opportunity to sign up for the Dog Jog at the early bird price of $20. Cost to sign up will be $25 the day of the race.
    Additionally, starting at 9 a.m. the shelter will have mobile adoptions and a Doggy Kissing Booth.
    This year, for the first time, the shelter are adding an “Ask the Trainer” table to get some personal training advice from Sue Barns, who trains dogs for Assistance Dogs of the West, and has co-authored the book “Training Your Diabetic Alert Dog.”
    Regular breakfast menu items consist of various flavors of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, juice and coffee.
    FOS will feature a silent auction of gift baskets donated by Zena Thomas and Best Buddy Baskets.
    Attendees can also visit with some of the shelter dogs who will be more than ready to meet and greet.
    Cost is $7 for adults and $4 for kids 10 years and younger.  

  • Chloe Keilers, a junior at Los Alamos High School, was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month.
    Keilers is the daughter of Chuck and Marjorie Madsen Keilers.
    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one student each month of the school year to honor as a Student of the Month. This year’s recipients reflect a combination of both LAHS seniors and juniors. Next year, only juniors will be recognized in hopes of inspiring their interest in Rotary programs that fall during the summer following junior year. Students are nominated by their teachers and chosen on the basis of academic achievement, extracurricular activities, and, in particular, service to the community.
    With a grade-point average of 4.0, Keilers is a member of National Honor Society and has managed to maintain high academic standards while running on the cross country team since seventh grade and while playing stringed instruments since fourth grade, namely, violin, viola, and now, upon receiving new hearing aids, she plays cello.
    In addition to music, Keilers has an interest in science. Most recently, she won first place in the Los Alamos County Science Fair and took second place in the Regional Fair in the Physics and Astronomy category.

  • The Los Alamos History Museum will have an exhibit opening in conjunction with two book signings.
    The exhibit, “Edith and Tilano: Bridges Between Two Worlds,” will be in the museum’s rotating exhibit space through the end of May.
    Patricia Klaus will be signing her book “An Atomic Love Story,” and Roseanne Roberts Archuletta will be signing her book “Women Marked for History.” The public is invited for an evening celebrating women’s contributions to history.
    The event is from 4-6 p.m. April 1 at the Los Alamos History Museum.
    At the place where the river makes a noise, Edith Warner and Tilano Montoya made a simple home beside Otowi Bridge, a home between centuries-old San Ildefonso Pueblo and the Pajarito Plateau with its homesteaders and the Los Alamos Ranch School and later the Manhattan Project.
    Warner and Montoya could never have expected to find world-famous people coming to their door, but when Warner was asked by J. Robert Oppenheimer to serve dinners to his scientists as a respite from their tense undertaking, that is exactly what happened. Otowi became a bridge between two worlds.
    Readers can experience their story through historic photos, artifacts, and Warner’s original letters and writings in “Edith and Tilano: Bridges Between Two Worlds.”

  • The Los Alamos Arts Council continues to offer programs to the public through its free Brown Bag Performance Series. Pianist Keith Porter-Snell will in concert along with cellist James Holland. The event will be at noon April 2 in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge.
    Porter-Snell is a pianist, piano teacher and writer of educational music for piano students. As a performer, he specializes in piano music written to be played with the left hand alone.
    Porter-Snell appears as recitalist, chamber musician, and concerto soloist throughout the United States and in the United Kingdom. He teaches beginning through advanced students, and has given more than 400 workshops to piano teachers throughout the United States and abroad.
    He has more than 150 titles published by the Kjos Music Company, a leading publisher of educational music. Porter-Snell won the Joanna Hodges International Piano Competition, which provided his London debut in 1984. He subsequently signed with Columbia Artist Management and recorded for Virgin Records.

  • With richly textured and lyrical language, written by José Cruz González, “September Shoes” pulls out of everyday complacency and asks what it means to really live and to die in this imperfect world.
    Set in the small Arizona border town of Dolores, “September Shoes” tells the story of a community ripped apart by tragedy, where Gail and Alberto, a plastic surgeon and his wife have just returned after three decades away for the funeral of Gail’s aunt Lilly. The entire town is mourning the loss of Lilly, a local treasure and owner of the only Chinese restaurant in town.
    Each character is searching to find meaning in death and tragedy, while also grappling with their own personal ghosts. Huilo, the caretaker at the cemetery is constructing a monument to the dead in the form of a giant red chair, while Cuki, the maid at the local motel is building a wall of shoes.
    González asks, what is left of us when we die? He concludes that whatever else we might leave behind, we always leave our shoes. With beautiful poetic language and a wonderful blending of Chicano, Hispanic, Anglo and Chinese culture.

  • One of the most far-reaching exhibits of New Mexico animal wood carvings, “Wooden Menagerie: Made in New Mexico,” debuts at the Museum of International Folk Art on April 6 with 107 artworks made by such masters as Felipe Archuleta, Patrociñio Barela, and José Dolores López. The exhibition runs through Feb. 15, 2015.
    The artworks range from narrative-to-abstracted in style, and include birds, reptiles, fish, cattle, an alligator that is almost smiling and a whimsical blue deer. These mixed-media carvings were created from elm and cottonwood along with glass marbles, leftover yellow paint from painting highway lines (utilized by Archuleta for a cheetah), broom bristles, dog hair (it is said that Archuleta would befriend stray dogs if he needed hair for, perhaps, a bear carving), rope, metal, leather, nails, sawdust and wood shavings.
    Animal woodcarving is a Hispano tradition going back to the 1700s in New Mexico.

  • Residents from Albuquerque and surrounding communities will join together for Walk MS, April 5 at Tiguex Park in Old Town in Albuquerque and May 3 at the Santa Fe Railyard Park, to make a statement and keep moving toward a cure for multiple sclerosis.
    Walk MS is a fundraising event for the National MS Society that raises funds to support MS research and provide services to individuals impacted by multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system.
 
    Visit walkMSnewmexico.org to register to walk, volunteer, or make a donation. Online registration is currently open. Registration is free, however all participants are encouraged to actively fundraise. 
    The average participant raises $225 and fundraising prizes are awarded beginning at the $100 level. Onsite registration and check-in begins at 8 a.m., followed by a 9 a.m. official start time.
For more information call 505-243-2792.
     

  •  

    Art exhibits

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces an exhibition: “Bits and Pieces: Works by Karina Hean, Catherine Gangloff and Michel Déjean.” From 5-7 p.m. March 28 through April 19.  

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces an exhibition: “A Day in the Life: Works by Holly Roberts.” The opening exhibition will be 5-7 p.m. May 30. Show runs until June 21.

    Art tours

    Santa Fe Studio Tour 2014 is a free, self-guided tour open to the public that meanders throughout Santa Fe featuring more than 30 open studios and the work of 60 Santa Fe artists. Many artists give demonstrations of their craft and share techniques and philosophies with visitors. The tour begins with a preview party and group show from all participating artists, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. June 27. Then all participating artists open their creative sanctuaries to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 28 and June 29. The public can explore the studios of jewelers, painters, sculptors and ceramists.

    Auditions

    Audition Notice for Adobe Theater’s production of Painting Churches by Tina Howe. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 5. Callbacks 6-8 p.m. April 5. Performance dates are Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 20-July 13.

    Announcements

  • Los Alamos
    Time Out Pizzeria, 118 State Road 4
    Date inspected: Feb. 18
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Aramark Coffee Kiosk, TA-3, SM 261
    Date inspected: Feb. 24
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.
    Santa Fe
    Home Run Pizza, 2801 Rodeo Road, Suite A3.
    Date inspected: Feb. 10
    Violations: Seven high-risk violations. No soap at hand washing station. No paper towels at hand washing station. Wet wash cloth out of sanitizer bucket. No air gap under three-compartment sink. Can opener has food and metal shaving build up. Employee drink has potential to cross contaminate food in prep area. Refrigerator is not maintaining proper temperatures. Heavy old food and grime on pizza equipment. Two moderate-risk violations. Food equipment and vents and fans have grime and dust build up. No test kit for sanitizer. One low-risk violation. Employees have no hair restraints, nets or hats.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up required on Feb. 28.

    Interfaith Shelter, 2801 Cerrillos Road
    Date inspected: Feb. 19
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

  • Sangre de Cristo Chorale seeks college-bound 2014 high school graduates dedicated to vocal music. The mailing deadline is April 1 and seniors are encouraged to apply for a $500 scholarship awarded to students dedicated to singing.
    The Hastings Smith Memorial Vocal Scholarship is among the musical education opportunities offered by the Santa Fe-based Sangre de Cristo Chorale to enrich the lives of young people in the region.
    The chorale, now in its 36th year, awards the scholarship to two applicants per year who want to excel in singing. Strong candidates will demonstrate a strong past achievement and future interest in singing, although intent to major in vocal music is not necessary. The award is based on strength of application and is intended to encourage continuing pursuit of vocal music.
    To be considered, graduating seniors must submit a letter of application describing the following:
    • musical experience and accomplishments
    • goals in pursuing further study of vocal music
    • plans in using the award to assist in vocal music progress