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Features

  • To accommodate the speaker, History On Tap has been rescheduled and will be from 5:30-7 p.m. March 21.  
    The speaker will be Ray Monk, author of “Robert Oppenheimer: A Life Inside the Center.” He has also written award-winning biographies of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell. He is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southampton, with research interests in the history of analytic philosophy, the philosophy of mathematics, and philosophical issues arising from the practice of biography.
    History On Tap is part of the On Tap series presented by the Los Alamos Creative District and hosted by the Los Alamos Historical Society. It takes place at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

  • Emily Martens of Los Alamos, a freshman at the College of Liberal Arts has been named to the 2016 fall semester dean’s list at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, the university announced last week.
    To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student must complete 12 or more letter-graded credits while attaining a 3.66 grade point average.

  • Today is the last day to nominate local businesses for the annual Chamber Awards.
    At the Chamber Gala on April 22, awards will be presented to Chamber Member Businesses who have been selected by their peers for their business performance in the past year.
    The Chamber is accepting nominations from Chamber members for Chamber member businesses and non-profits in the following categories:
    • Financial Institution of the Year
    • Most Innovative Business of the Year
    • Restaurant of the Year
    • Service Business of the Year (salon, computer repair, cleaners, etc.)
    • Retailer of the Year
    • Non-profit of the Year
    • Media Outlet of the Year
    • Overall Business of the Year
    Send nominations to Nancy@losalamos.org no later than 5 p.m. today.
    Tickets for the Gala are $100 and can be purchased on the Chamber events page losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com/events/details/chamber-gala-224.

  • Family Night at the Los Alamos Nature Center is March 14. Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey from 6-7 p.m.
    The nature center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.
    Mark your calendars: the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center.
    Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all.
    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • TODAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    March Night Sky Show from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    Coro de Camara to perform at 7 p.m. at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road in Los Alamos. Northern New Mexico’s premiere chamber chorus sings a Broadway concert with highlights from “Les Miserables” and a tribute to Stephen Sondheim. Tickets at the door are a suggested donation of $20 for adults and $10 for students. Visit corodecamara-nm.org.
    SATURDAY
    Saturday and Sunday: Drawing and Painting Natural Forms (2 day class) from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy botanical drawing and watercolor with Santa Fe artist Lisa Coddington. Cost is $48 for members, $60 for non-members.

    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SUNDAY
    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • Summit Garden Club will hold its monthly meeting at 1:30 p.m. Monday at the White Rock Library, and will feature a talk and slide show on the flora and fauna of Mongolia.  
    Summit member Bev Cooper and her husband Martin traveled to Mongolia in the Summer of 2015 with the goal of seeing white neck cranes, demoiselle cranes, argali sheep an ibex.  
    The Coopers saw all of these, and experienced a new culture. The public is welcome to attend the talk.
    Also, White Rock Library Director Veronica Encinas will speak about the development and implementation of the plan to landscape the White Rock Library and Teen Center area in a way that would use native plants for greenery and use water wisely.
    For more information, call Shelby at 662-2625.

  • BY KELLY DOLEJSI
    Special to the Monitor

  • Belisama Irish Dance School will host a fundraiser from 2-4 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St., Los Alamos.
    The lively afternoon will include ceili dancing (Irish social dance), live music, a short Irish dance demonstration and refreshments to help fund the Belisama Irish Dance Company’s future performances and new costumes. A Girl Scout Fun Patch will be offered for those Girl Scouts joining the fun.
    Special guests Billy Turney and Lucinda Sydow of Chili Line Accordions will provide traditional tunes in a fun environment for the whole family.
    Tickets are $10 for children, $15 for adults, and $50 for families with four or more members (plus a young guest). Ages 4 and under are free. Call 795-8011 for tickets or stop by CB Fox in Los Alamos.

  •  Artist and instructor Lisa Coddington will teach a two-day workshop on drawing and watercolor using botanical and natural subjects at the Los Alamos Nature Center March 4 and 5.
    This class, made possible by Pajarito Environmental Education Center, is appropriate for all skill levels to refine skills and enjoy the creative process.
    The workshop will run from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. March 4, and 1-4 p.m. March 5.
    Register to learn techniques for creating realistic, still life, nature-inspired art.
    Participants will explore pencil and watercolor techniques that portray plants and animals in this hands-on workshop. With easy-to-understand demonstrations and master artist examples, Codedington will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional Autumn-themed subjects.
    A minimum of eight students are required for the class, so those interested in the workshop are encouraged to register on the PEEC website by March 1. Otherwise, the class will be canceled if there is not enough interest.
    Artist-instructor Coddington earned her master of art degree at Syracuse in illustration. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction. Her whimsical characters have been licensed for ornaments and are also featured on greeting cards.

  • Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May.

  • The community is invited to enjoy a lunchtime performance by Brave New Brass during the Brown Bag Lunch March 1 at Fuller Lodge.
    Brave New Brass is a brass ensemble formed in Los Alamos, based on previous brass quintets organized by Dave and Deniece Korzekwa.
    The members of Brave New Brass have a broad interest in the music available for small brass ensembles of various combinations, and have been performing as a group in Los Alamos since 2012.
    Members of the group are all local Los Alamos musicians, with Elizabeth Hunke (French horn), Deniece Korzekwa (tuba), Dave Korzekwa (trumpet), Mandy Marksteiner (trumpet) and Bruce Warren (trombone). \As an applied mathematician at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Hunke develops and maintains the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model, CICE, which is used in numerous climate-modeling centers around the world. In her spare time she plays horn with several Los Alamos ensembles, and she is active in the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots that provides scholarship opportunities for women and aviation education in the community.

  • By Debbie Stone

    Special to the Monitor

  • BOSTON (AP) — In a Mexican cave system so beautiful and hot that it is called both Fairyland and hell, scientists have discovered life trapped in crystals that could be 50,000 years old.
    The bizarre and ancient microbes were found dormant in caves in Naica, Mexico, and were able to exist by living on minerals such as iron and manganese, said Penelope Boston, head of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute. .
    “It’s super life,” said Boston, who presented the discovery Friday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Boston.
    If confirmed, the find is yet another example of how microbes can survive in extremely punishing conditions on Earth.
    Though it was presented at a science conference and was the result of nine years of work, the findings haven’t yet been published in a scientific journal and haven’t been peer reviewed. Boston planned more genetic tests for the microbes she revived both in the lab and on site.
    The life forms – 40 different strains of microbes and even some viruses – are so weird that their nearest relatives are still 10 percent different genetically. That makes their closest relative still pretty far away, about as far away as humans are from mushrooms, Boston said.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre tackles a play about life, loss, and nothing is as it seems with its newest play, “The Other Place.”
    The drama opens Friday and centers on Juliana Smithton, a successful neurologist who is on the brink of a breakthrough in her field, but the rest of her life is unraveling. Her husband has filed for divorce, her daughter has eloped with a much older man and her own health is in jeopardy.
    Piece by piece, a mystery unfolds as fact blurs with fiction, past collides with present, and the elusive truth about Smithton boils to the surface.
    Gwen Lewis, director, was drawn to this play because “Sharr White did a beautiful, tasteful job writing about a very difficult situation. The characters of Juliana and Ian go from professionals to a place that is new and challenging for both of them. Both explore feelings of helplessness, which the audience will be able to relate to,” she said.
    Just as Smithton’s research leads to a potential breakthrough, events take a disorienting turn.
    During a lecture to colleagues at an exclusive beach resort, she glimpses an enigmatic young woman in a yellow bikini amidst the crowd of business suits. But in this brilliantly crafted work, nothing is as it seems.

  • The Los Alamos Community Winds will present its mid-Winter concert at 7 p.m. Saturday at White Rock Baptist Church.
    The concert will feature marches, original music for concert band, as well as music from film and television.
    The featured work on the program is Modeste Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition.”
    Written in honor of his artist friend, Victor Hartmann,“Pictures at an Exhibition” takes the listener on a stroll amongst paintings and sketches depicting the Russian people, legends, and myths. Each movement is separated by a “promenade” literally intended to be heard while walking from one gallery to the next. Sadly, only a few of the original Hartmann paintings exist.
    Originally written for piano, the work has achieved much greater fame and recognition in the concert hall due to its being transcribed for orchestra in 1922 by Maurice Ravel (at the request of famed conductor Serge Koussevitzky.) Ravel was able to exploit more fully the coloristic possibilities the work contained despite the “monochromatic” quality of the original.
    While Ravel’s orchestration was not the first created for orchestra, it has certainly become the most famous.

  • TODAY
    Feature Film: “Black Holes” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.  Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    MONDAY
    PEEC Nature Center is open  10 a.m.-4 p.m. today. Free.
    TUESDAY
    Pebble Pups: Future Rockhounds of America from 4:30-6 p.m. at the Nature Center. This geology program is for youth ages 5-9. Cost is $95 for non-members, $80 for PEEC members.

    Community Night: Local Wildlife Photography at 6 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover the art of nature photography. Free.

    Kiwanis meeting from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. Laura Loy, director of the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Community Internship Collaboration, will speak about this partnership.

    Rotary Club of Los Alamos meeting from noon-1 p.m. at the Los Alamos Golf Course. Artist Ruth Tatter and Michelle Griffin of the Los Alamos Museum of Art will be the speaker.

    Parenting the Love and Logic Way, a class for parents of grade-school children, from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Family Strengths Network, 3540 Orange St. Free. To register, visit lafsn.org, or call 662-4515.

  • Jan. 15 — A boy. Lincoln Edward Disterhaupt. Born to Jennie and Jason Disterhaupt.
    Jan. 31 — A boy. Waylon Knox. Born to Victoria and Lee Knox.
    Jan. 31 – A girl. Isabella Kaylee Neukirch. Born to Amanda and Levi Neukirch.
    Feb. 1 — A boy. Robert Joseph Lopez. Born to Tammy and Robert Lopez.
    Feb. 8 — A girl. Riley Grace Martinez. Born to Amber and Matthew Martinez.
    Feb. 8 — A boy. Quinn Sebastian Argo-Mitchell. Born to Sylvan Sierra Argo and Albert James Mitchell.

  • Trinity Site, the location where on July 16, 1945, the first man-made nuclear explosion was detonated, is open only twice a year, and the Los Alamos Historical Society will offer a guided tour to the site March 31 and April 1 for the spring opening.
    The Society’s Trinity Tour includes a two-day, one night experience via the Alamogordo southern approach through the seldom-seen interior of White Sands Missile Range.  
    Departure from Trinity Site will be out of the northern Stallion Gate, with a lunch stop at New Mexico Tech in Socorro.
    Bonuses include a visit to the young (5,000-year-old) lava flows of Valley of Fires, and the New Mexico Space Museum overlooking the Tularosa Basin, Holloman Air Force Base, and White Sands Missile Range.
    This excursion aboard a comfortable, restroom-equipped coach includes experienced tour direction is by Buffalo Tours, leading its 14th trip to Trinity.  
     The cost for Historical Society members is $350/person double occupancy; $400 for non-members, with a $50 single supplement for either. The price includes a tax-deductible donation to the Los Alamos Historical Society.

  • TODAY
    Adult Broomball at the Los Alamos County Ice Rink from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Each person will need to bring their own broom to play. Helmets and pads are suggested but not required. No passes accepted. Cost is $5 per person, ages 16 and older. For more information, call the Ice Rink at 662-4500 or the Aquatic Center front desk at 662-8170, or visit losalamosnm.us/rec.  

    The Los Alamos Federated Republican Women will have a day out. They will join the NMFRW at the Roundhouse, then lunch and finally a tour of the New Mexico Supreme Court  Building.  Anyone interested should email losalamosfrw@gmail.com for more information.

    Astronomy Show: History of Cosmic Distance at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Dr. Paul Arendt to explore the history of how we learned the distances to stars. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY
    Snowshoe Hike in the Valles Caldera from 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join a ranger and PEEC on a 2-2.5 hour, easy-to-moderate snowshoe hike in the Valles Caldera National Preserve. Preserve entrance fee.

    Parenting the Love and Logic Way class from 8:15-10:30 a.m. at Family Strengths Network, 3540 Orange St. A class for parents of teens. Free, thanks to Juvenile Justice Advisory Board. To register, visit lafsn.org, or call 662-4515.

  • The Los Alamos DWI Planning Council and Atomic City Transit (ACT) provided safe ride services once again to Los Alamos residents.
    Although the ridership was not as high as past events, those that did take advantage of the free ride were taken home safely.
    “The service worked like a charm; Armando at dispatch and Jonathan the driver were just wonderful,” said Los Alamos resident Tina Sibbitt. “I changed my return pick up time about three times due to having too much fun, and they were absolutely OK with that. Please give my thanks to the county for this service and people are crazy if they don’t take advantage of it!”
    The DWI Planning Council and ACT hope that people will take Sibbitt’s advice for the next Buzz Bus event on St. Patrick’s Day. The council and ACT are also developing a schedule and route for a shuttle-type Buzz Bus service for the upcoming Summer Concert Series at Ashley Pond. For questions about the Buzz Bus service, or for those interested in joining the DWI Planning Council, contact Kirsten Bell, at kirsten.bell@lacnm.us or 662-8241.