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Features

  • TODAY
    Today-Dec. 13 —
Forest Explorers Hike and Play from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Get outside this fall by exploring with PEEC! This six-week class is for youth ages 5 to 8. Cost is $135 for non-members, $110 for PEEC members.

    Nature Loom Installation from 2-4 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover Earth Art and use natural objects in artistic expression during this hands-on group art installation with Liz Martineau. Cost is $5 for members, $7 for non-members.

    Jemez House Thrift Shop at 13 Sherwood Blvd. in White Rock will have a bag day from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.  
    THURSDAY
     Nature on Tap: Bandelier Bird Banding at 5:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join in a discussion about the 2017 Bandelier bird banding experience with Bandelier biologist Sarah Milligan and bird banding interns Daniel Dorantes and Kim Geissler. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Astronomy Show: Asteroid Threats at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join us to learn about asteroids: the close calls, current risk, and how we know what to expect. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

  • A Better Way for LA invites the public to attend a fall meeting on Monday, Oct. 16, at the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce at 15th Street and Central Avenue. A light supper will be provided.
    The program begins at 7 p.m. with a talk by William Mead on the “History of Roundabout Decisions for N.M. 502 in Los Alamos County.”
    The planned roundabout at the intersection of Trinity Drive and Central Avenue will force drivers to travel in conflicting “circular” paths, negatively impacting both pedestrians and vehicles.
    Next, Heather Ortega will present a talk on “Neighborhood Associations: Helpful or Hurtful to Community Relations”. The Los Alamos County Council is proposing the use of public funds to form “voluntary” neighborhood associations.
    While they are intended to be an advocate for residents, there is the potential for fraud, abuse, harassment and onerous fines.
    Brady Burke will give concluding remarks. He recently announced his candidacy for the Los Alamos County Council.

  • Robert Altman’s acclaimed Western “McCabe and Mrs. Miller” (1971, rated R) will screen at 6:30 p.m. Thursday upstairs at Mesa Public Library.
    It’s winter in the Old West. John McCabe (Warren Beatty), a newcomer to town, partners up with Constance Miller (Julie Christie), a professional madam, who offers to use her experience to help McCabe with the business in exchange for a share of the profits.
    Success ensues. However, a large mining company, drawn by the town’s zinc deposits, wants to buy out McCabe along with the rest of the town. What will happen if he refuses?
    Christie received an Oscar nomination for her role, and the film was nominated for several other awards as well. In 2010, the Library of Congress selected “McCabe and Mrs. Miller,” which is based on the 1959 novel McCabe by Edmund Naughton, for preservation in the United States National Film Registry for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.”
    Additionally, Leonard Cohen fans will be interested to know that the film’s soundtrack consists entirely of three of Cohen’s early works: “The Stranger Song,” “Sisters of Mercy,” and “Winter Lady.”

  • Visitors are invited to spend a fine autumn day in Frijoles Canyon at Bandelier’s annual Fall Fiesta from 11-3 Saturday at Bandelier National Monument’s Visitor Center.

    Each weekend through the summer, Pueblo cultural demonstrators showcase their work at the park.

    For the Fall Fiesta, all these artists are invited to come on the one day, sell their crafts, and talk with visitors.  In addition, it’s also a chance for the artists to visit with each other.

    Handmade items that are expected to be available include pottery, jewelry, drums, and carvings.  A Pueblo dance group is scheduled to present traditional dances several times during the day, and the Santa Fe Raptor Center is planning to bring their rescue birds.

    “We are very lucky to have these fine Pueblo artisans and demonstrators come and share their skills, knowledge, and beautiful work with us,” said Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott. “Their stories and traditions go back in an unbroken line to their long-ago relatives here. Visiting with them helps the rest of us to make connections with the Ancestral Pueblo people who made their homes in Bandelier’s cliffs and canyons.”

  • Did you know that October is National Bullying Prevention month and the month also includes Unity Day?

    Unity Day is a day when we all wear orange, talk about bullying and try to make our community, however we define one, a little better. Check them out at pacer.org.

    Oct. 25 is the day for 2017, and I really hope community members will bring the message forward, in any way that works best for you.

    You can start something in whatever club, organization or community you claim or wear orange to bring awareness.

    Bullying can lead to really bad choices no matter what age, income bracket or community it seems to visit. I heard of a local story where someone was verbally assaulted at our Health Fair because of her apparel choice.

    I haven’t been able to speak with the person to verify the story, but what makes me even more sad is when I was told that no one came to the aide of the person under attack.

    If you see something, I beg you to please stand up. If you see something, say something or nothing will ever change. If we allow people to be ugly than ugly becomes the norm.

    I am always afraid that I may err on the crazy side and read someone the riot act, or at least I hope I would be the one to intervene.

  • Getting a new puppy, kitten, or older cat or dog is an exciting experience, but having pets comes with certain responsibilities, including potty training. It may be a time-consuming process to potty train your pet, but Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, said it is necessary to develop a long-lasting, positive relationship with your pet.
    “Inappropriate eliminations are one of the biggest reasons pets are surrendered,” Stickney said. “Developing good bathroom habits early is key to having a pet you will enjoy for a long time.”
    Potty training should begin as soon as you bring your pet home. If you’re training an adult dog or a puppy, be sure to give them plenty of time to use the bathroom and stay with them until they go. Then, reward the animal with a treat or positive praise so they understand that eliminating outside is good behavior.
    If you’re training a kitten or cat, Stickney said finding a litter box that your pet is comfortable getting in and out of is key. Additionally, if your kitten was using a litter box before it came to live with you, it could be helpful to start potty training your pet with that specific litter.

  • The next Family Night at the Los Alamos Nature Center is Oct. 10.

    Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey from 6-7 p.m. The Nature Center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.

    This October’s Family Night will be the last of the season to have a campfire and make s’mores, one of the most popular features of warm-weather Family Nights.

    And mark your calendars – the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center.

    Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all. Next month’s Family Night will take place on Nov. 14.

    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • The public is invited to join the Los Alamos Family YMCA for a panel discussion on “Attracting and Nurturing Volunteers: A Conversation,” from 5-6 p.m. Oct. 19 at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos in the Lecture Hall, building 2.

    The discussion will be led by Diana Martinez, of the Los Alamos Family YMCA, and Todd Nickols, of the Los Alamos Historical Society.

    These are leaders of two local organizations with robust volunteer programs. The speakers will discuss the joys (and pains) of engaging the community in nonprofit efforts. Among the topics will be:

    • How to recruit and retain volunteers for your organization

    • Different ways to recognize the work of your volunteers

    • Identify resources for developing or strengthening your own volunteer program

    • How to engage youth volunteers

    • Recruiting volunteers to help with programming

    • Preparing for group volunteer activities.

    Martinez and Nickols will begin the discussion with their experiences and insights, but they hope to engage the audience with their questions and comments.

    Bring ideas and questions regarding this lifeblood of any nonprofit organization.

  • No doubt about it, Whiskers likes to be top dog, even though he’s a cat. This is according to volunteers at the Los Alamos Animal Shelter, where Whiskers currently resides.  
    Whiskers, who is about 4-years-old, doesn’t like to be around other cats. Adult cats maybe, but he tends to bully kittens. He loves humans, though, and he is on the hunt for his forever home.
    His previous owner had to give him up, as Whiskers couldn’t live in an assisted living facility. Whiskers is an American Shorthair with orange-and-white markings. If adopted, Whiskers is guaranteed to shower his new owner with all the attention they give him back.
     He’s neutered and chipped.
    Whiskers has had all his shots, and is negative for the FeLV-FIV virus. He does have one awesome medical anomaly though, he has a bent tail. It doesn’t seem to bother him, and he seems to be rather proud of it. For more information, call the shelter at 505-662-8179 or email the shelter at police-psa@lacnm.us.
    Photo By Paulina Gwaltney Photography, (910) 333-6362, Gwaltney’s studio is located at 3500 Trinity Drive.

  • The Los Alamos Arts Council and Los Alamos County and many arts groups in the area will celebrate National Month of Arts and Culture with an Evening of Arts and Culture Oct. 13.

    The three-hour tour of the Arts District will be from 6-9 p.m. and include performers, artists, poets and others. There will be short programs in nine venues within the Arts District.

    Patrons can pick up a program card – a guide to who is doing what, where and when – from an information booth at Fuller Lodge, or at any of the nine venues, then walk to each venue enjoying the arts diversity of Los Alamos.

    This will be a way to celebrate local arts creativity and cultural diversity. There is no admission fee to experience the Evening of Arts and Culture, thanks to the generous support of all participating groups and the sponsors.

  • Join Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Jemez Mountain Herbarium curator Chick Keller at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 2 for an easy walk to identify local wildflower species. It is free to attend the last Wildflower Walk of the season, and no advance registration is required.

    You won’t want to miss the last Wildflower Walk of the year.

    Participants receive a plant list that, along with instruction from Keller, will help them learn how to identify the late blooming wildflowers in Los Alamos.

    The group will meet at 5:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Nature Center, located at 2600 Canyon Road, to carpool to the trailhead.

    For more information, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Enjoy Bandelier - And Other Public Lands - With No Entrance Fee on National Public Lands Day
    Often just known as National Public Lands Day is generally billled as the nation’s largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands.

    On this day, thousands of people do volunteer work such as trail maintenance and litter pickup, while others make a special point of taking the day to enjoy the public lands that belong to everyone. To celebrate this special day, many federal lands, and some state parks as well, offer free admission. 

    This year in New Mexico, volunteer opportunities are as diverse as trail work projects on the Santa Fe and Lincoln National Forests (U.S. Forest Service), tagging monarch butterflies at the Bosque Del Apache Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) and work projects on the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument (Bureau of Land Management) and at Cochiti Lake (Army Corps of Engineers).

    At Bandelier National Monument (National Park Service), no work projects are planned this year, and the emphasis is on exploring and enjoying this treasured part of the Jemez Mountains. No entrance fees will be collected that day. The bookstore will have everything on 15-percent discount.

  • WASHINGTON — In a quest to end cookie-cutter health care, U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact – and to finally customize ways to prevent and treat disease.

    Why does one sibling get sick but not another? Why does a drug cure one patient but only cause nasty side effects in the next?

    Finding out is a tall order. Today, diseases typically are treated based on what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients.

    “We depend on the average, the one-size-fits-all approach because it’s the best we’ve got,” said Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

    That’s changing: The NIH’s massive “All Of Us” project will push what’s called precision medicine, using traits that make us unique in learning to forecast health and treat disease. Partly it’s genetics. What genes do you harbor that raise your risk of, say, heart disease or Type 2 diabetes or various cancers?

  • Love, romance, action and science fiction collide Saturday at Bandelier National Monument’s annual Opera on the Rocks event. Held at the Juniper Campground Amphitheater, this year’s presentation will be excerpts from Mozart’s “Abduction from the Seraglio,” done Star Trek style.

    “Though the opera’s trappings may be out of this world, Mozart’s memorable melodies remain intact. You really don’t have to be a Star Trek fan or an opera fan. As long as you enjoy a good laugh and some impressive singing, you’re going to have a really good time,” said the Pacific Opera Project, the original creator of the concept.

    Los Alamos’ own opera guild, Opera Alta, will be staging the event Saturday, with all the characters singing in German.

    Those looking to go can still purchase tickets at guildsofsfo.org. Those attending are encouraged to bring a jacket, warm clothing and dress as their favorite Star Trek character. Campers at the site are welcome to see the production too, ticket or no ticket. Food vendors include Sirphey, and beverages from Santa Fe Cider Works, Velarde and Gruet Winder and Black Mesa Winery.

    The opening act with by drumming by renowned musician Cochiti Pueblo resident Arnold Herrera.

  • The second of the monthly Brown Bag Performances, will be presented at Fuller Lodge from noon-1 p.m. Oct. 4, and will feature trumpet player, Jan McDonald, leading the locally acclaimed Black Mesa Brass Quintet.

    The program will present popular and classical tunes arranged for brass quintet and drum set. Favorites such as “Sweet Georgia Brown,” “Basin Street Blues,” “Nice Work If You Can Get It,” along with the music of Bach and Rossini will be featured in this toe-tapping, sassy and brassy performance.

    All Brown Bag Series performances are informal and are free to the public.

    The public is invited to attend and bring a lunch to munch on, while enjoying some gifted performers presenting uplifting and stress-relieving music.

    McDonald has been a mainstay of the Los Alamos and Santa Fe music scene for decades. He is recognized nationally as an accomplished trumpet player and educator. He performs with many professional groups in New Mexico, and is the recipient of the Outstanding Secondary Educator Award and the Outstanding New Mexico Jazz Educator Award.

    Black Mesa Brass Quintet was formed in 1990 and still has three of the original five members.

    Their repertoire is an eclectic mix of classical, modern, pop, and jazz tunes.

  • Halloweekend returns to haunt Los Alamos on Oct. 27 and 28.

    On Oct. 27, Los Alamos MainStreet hosts Trick-or-Treat on MainStreet in downtown Los Alamos from 4-6 p.m.

    Main Street and Central Avenue, from 15th to 20th Streets, are closed to auto traffic and become a safe pedestrian area where local businesses and organizations distribute candy to costumed families.

    While businesses in the downtown area open their doors to the public, this is also an opportunity for businesses and organizations that are not located in the downtown area to be involved.

    In 2016, an estimated 5,000 people took part in the weekend’s festivities.

  • TODAY
    Los Alamos Piecemakers Quilt Guild “Tomorrow’s Heirlooms” Quilt Show from 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. at the Crossroads Bible Church in Los Alamos. Tickets for the show are $2 for adults and $1 for children under 12. There will be vendors from all over New Mexico, a Silent Auction and numerous quilts and other hand-made items to view. Tickets will be available for the Donation Quilt “Spinning Stars.”

    Los Alamos Little Theatre will present Alan Ayckbourn’s “Communicating Doors,” a time-traveling murder mystery, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar St. Performances will be 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays Sept. 22-23. Visit lalt.org for more information.

    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Astronomy and Climate
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore the relationships between astronomy cycles and climate with Chick Keller. Cost is $6/adult, $4/child.
    SATURDAY

  • Members of the Environmental Sustainability Board and staff from the county Eco Station will walk through White Rock and Los Alamos neighborhoods today to survey recycle roll carts at the curb.

    The county staff will check the carts for the volume of recycling placed in them, in order to assist them in evaluating options for route pick up and frequency of pick up for the future brush roll carts that will be added to the system and distributed next year.

  • Production is underway on a local commercial promoting the businesses participating in Small Business Saturday in Los Alamos. Filming started Thursday at several of the retailers who have already signed up to be involved in the event.

    Jean Gindreau of PAC-8 and Kate O’Donnell of Real Deal Advertising started early Thursday with their camera at Rose Chocolatier, filming actresses, locals and shop owner Marguerite McClay. Filming was scheduled to take place during the day at Pet Pangaea, Boomerang, Bennett’s Fine Jewelry, and CB Fox. Metzger’s Do-it- Best Hardware is among the businesses on the production schedule for next week.

    The commercial will air at the Real Deal theater in late October and November when the holiday block buster movies are scheduled for release.

    Businesses can still sign up to be part of Small Business Saturday. It’s free to sign up to participate and gives the business substantial promotion.

    To sign up call Ufemia Bernal-Rios at 661-4816 or email Ufemia@losalamos.org.

  • “The West has passed – more’s the pity. In another 25 years the old-time westerner will have gone too – gone with the buffalo and the antelope. I’m going to hand down to posterity a bit of the unadulterated real thing, if it’s the last thing I do – and I’m going to do it muy pronto.”

     

    – W. Herbert “Buck” Dunton

     

    Enjoy a close look at the work of an artist whose art has embodied the Southwest for four decades. Taos Art Museum at Fechin House will present a retrospective exhibition of the artwork of painter Walt Gonske, to open at the beginning of the Taos Fall Arts Festival on Saturday.

    An acknowledged master of Southwestern art, with more than four decades of exploring every aspect of the mountain desert landscapes of northern New Mexico, the painter Walt Gonske actually started out in life on the East Coast, and envisioned a career in illustration. He has defied expectations ever since, and flourished both in what he chose to do and where he chose to live. This exhibition is a celebration of those choices.