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Features

  • If you’re looking into a new pet but don’t want to settle for the usual cat or dog, geese might be a good pet for you.
    In order to own pet geese, you must have adequate space and check with city guidelines and neighborhood associations to make sure backyard poultry, ducks and geese are allowed in your area.
    Although many of us have heard the horror stories of aggressive geese attacking park visitors, pet geese who are hand raised and handled daily are often more docile.
    Before you jump into owning geese, there are a few things you should know and consider in order to create a comfortable living environment where your geese can thrive.
    Your first step in owning pet geese is choosing the right breed. There are a number of breeds to choose from, many of them making great pets. Dr. Sharman Hoppes, clinical associate professor for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, recommends breeds like the Toulouse, the American Buff and the Pilgrim, as these breeds are considered to be good pets by her clients.
    Geese are also flock animals, so consider getting 2-3 geese to help create a more natural environment. Females are less likely to fight with one another, so they may make a better option as pets.

  • Reminder: It is time to submit entries for the Friends of the Shelter Calendar. Do it online at calendar.lafos.org. If you have adopted a shelter pet, particularly a pet from the Los Alamos Animal Shelter, consider adding their photograph to the 2016 calendar.
    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home. Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Cupcake — A 4-year-old, calico, who still learning about shelter life and slowly adjusting. She has a gorgeous coat that she would love to show off to new visitors! Young kids might be a bit too rambunctious for her, but she does enjoy the company of older children and adults. Cupcake is hoping that you’ll stop in so she can show you how sweet she is and take her home!

  • Fifty years ago a far-sighted, bipartisan group in Congress established the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which taps a fraction of the nation’s offshore oil and gas revenues to give all Americans a lifetime of outdoor recreational opportunity.
    Congress intended the fund to be used for “preserving, developing and assuring accessibility to … outdoor recreation resources … and to strengthen the health and vitality of the citizens of the United States …”
    Every state has benefited from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. It has built playgrounds and parks, improved hiking trails and campgrounds, and provided access to public land for the enjoyment of Americans of every age, background and place of residence.
    In fact, some of the first LWCF grants in New Mexico went to Los Alamos County nearly 50 years ago and used to develop Camp May Community Park.
    Other local projects have included ball field lighting, the comfort station at Overlook Park and improvements at Los Alamos Entrance Park.

  • As September arrives, we discover National Attendance Awareness Month and Los Alamos Public Schools is excited to engage the entire community as to the importance of good attendance.
    “School is more fun when you have good attendance,” said Dr. Kurt Steinhaus, Los Alamos Public Schools superintendent. “It is easier to understand the assignments, the learning makes better sense, you are caught up, there is more time to ask questions, you are able to ‘stay on top’ of the work and it is easier to make good friends.”
    As part of Steinhaus’ back to school welcome message, he reminded students and families of key items that are important to student success including taking care of yourself, getting involved, planning, making good decisions, asking for help when you need it, having a good attitude and being true to yourself.
    While the ideas are meant for students, the message could also apply to community members. When youth see adults with role model behaviors like taking care of themselves and having a good attitude, the lessons are absorbed like a sponge and can create behaviors or patterns for a lifetime.

  • Life-sized mannequins, piles of medical equipment and extensive checklists filled the testing room during the last day of University of New Mexico-Los Alamos EMT-Basic class recently as students endeavored to diagnose and treat their “patients.” They were taking practical and written tests to finish the 10-credit core course that enables them to sit for the National Registry Exam to be certified Emergency Medical Technicians or EMTs.
    The EMT certification is a stepping-stone to become a paramedic or other medical professional, and EMTs can work in pre-hospital environments, such as patient transport, fire departments and police departments. EMT-Basic is a core class of UNM-LA’s Associate of Science degree, and also serves students pursuing bachelors and medical degrees, or individuals who need emergency responder skills.
    “My test scenario was a man with shortness of breath having an anaphylactic reaction,” said student Holly Erickson, a junior at Clemson University in South Carolina, describing her final exam in EMT-Basic. “I found out he was allergic to peanuts and gave him epinephrine.”

  • The Los Alamos Co-op Market is holding a Harvest Festival Saturday to celebrate local food, including Colorado peaches and organic green chile from Seco Spice.
    Triny Vigil, the interim general manager will grill green chile cheeseburgers using local beef from Sweet Grass Co-op in Colorado. They will also offer veggie green chile cheeseburgers.
    Most activities will be from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. including chair massages by Trish Walk-Hopkins, from Mariposa Body, and the children’s bouncy house, donated by Little Forest Playschool.
    Dr. Wendy Van Dilla, of naturopathic physician and owner of Holistic Health Care will offer demonstrations of low-level laser therapy from
    9 a.m.- 2 p.m.
    In addition to food and relaxation, Tim Martinez, a local farmer from Velarde, will share his knowledge of farming in the Rio Grande Basin.
    For more information about the co-op’s Harvest Festival, visit the co-op’s website losalamos.coop.
    The Los Alamos Co-op Market provides the community with access to a wide variety of local, natural, and organic foods and can be found at 95 Entrada Dr.
    Check the website losalamos.coop, or call the co-op at 695-1579 for more information.

  • Art exhibits
    The 11th Annual Gala Exhibition and Auction on display through Friday will showcase artists from across the U.S. and abroad who find inspiration in Fechin’s legacy, Taos and the creative traditions of the Southwest.

    Zane Bennett Gallery announces “IMPACTS! II” an exhibition featuring Bi Rongrong, Shen Fan, Liang Shaoji and others, with seven artists in total. The show is at 435 South Guadalupe St., across from the rail station in Santa Fe, and coincides with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Railyard Arts District. There will be events occurring during these openings involving traditional and contemporary Chinese culture, with more information to follow.

    “Where the Buffalo Roam.” Angel Wynn, American artist and photographer. Show runs through Aug. 31 at Angel Wynn Gallery in Santa Fe.

    Kathleen Doyle Cook, “Intensity in Abstraction.” Through Aug. 31 at the New Concept Gallery in Santa Fe.

    Michael Lange – Wald/Fluss. Friday through Oct. 17. Opening, artist reception, and book signing from 5-7 p.m. Friday at the photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe St. in Santa Fe.

    Solo Artist Show with Michael Andryc. “Sophisticated Primitive Art.” Through Aug. 31 at the Red Boot Gallery at Range Café in Bernalillo.

  • THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, August 28, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 8-14-15
    02:00 PM United in Christ
    03:00 PM Road to Recovery
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM “Inflationary Cosmology – Is Our Universe Part of a Multiverse?”
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “New Mexico in World War II”
    08:00 PM The Garage
    08:30 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:00 PM Bandelier National Monument Naturalization Ceremony
    10:30 PM FMP Live
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, August 29, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, August 30, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:15 PM Los Alamos Non-Profit Spotlight
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV
    Monday, August 31, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program

  • Teatro Paraguas launches its 12th season with a premiere production of Santa Fe playwright Alix Hudson’s play “Our Lady of Mariposas.” The show runs Sept. 3-13 at Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe.
    The play builds a story of a family in southeastern New Mexico around the massive die-off of monarch butterflies in the winter of 2002.
    Manuel (played by Jason Jaramillo), an immigrant from Mexico, is trying to raise his 7-year-old daughter Esperanza (played by Maya Sanchez) alone after his wife, Estrella, has inextricably disappeared. The only clue to her whereabouts are cryptic postcards without return addresses posted from different cities.
    The play unfolds as a memory play related by Esperanza as a grown woman (played by Rosario Roybal). The next-door neighbor in the run-down apartment complex, Kate (played by Liza Frolkis), tries to help the father and daughter as they wait and hope for Estrella’s return. The three are also waiting for the return migration from Mexico of the monarch butterflies. The cast is rounded out by Manuel’s work buddies, Dave (played by Tomás Rivera) and Eulogio (played by Rick Vargas). Guitarist JoJo Sena de Tarnoff performs original music throughout the play. The cast are regulars from other Teatro Paraguas productions.

  • Author Dr. David Stuart, one of the foremost experts on Chacoan culture, brings his latest discoveries to Mesa Public Library Thursday as part of the monthly Authors Speak series. The talk will take place at 7 p.m., Thursday, in the Upstairs Rotunda at Mesa Public Library.
    Stuart is an internationally recognized anthropologist whose most cited books are “Prehistoric New Mexico,” “Anasazi America,” “The Guaymas Chronicles,” and the recently released, “Ancient People of the Pajarito Plateau.”
    He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of New Mexico and he served many years at UNM as associate provost for academic affairs.
    Stuart has been a lecturer at SAR and in Edinburgh, London, Mexico City and at the Sorbonne in Paris. He is also the author of “The Ancient Southwest: Chaco Canyon, Bandelier and Mesa Verde” and “Pueblo Peoples on the Pajarito Plateau: Archaeology and Efficiency.”
    “Anasazi America: Seventeen Centuries on the Road from Center Place,” draws parallels between the decline and fall of Chacoan civilization and the culture of the first world today. Stuart has researched the economic, public health and agricultural indicators, and has come to the conclusion that the inhabitants of Chaco failed to adapt to rapid growth.

  • Senior citizens of Los Alamos who are age 90 and over, were treated to an ice cream social at the Betty Ehart Senior Center on Aug. 14. Pauline Schneider said the oldest participant was 99 years old. The ice cream social is a regular occurance at the senior center and always forms a good crowd. 

  • Bike MS: Pedal los Pueblos, benefiting the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, will unite an estimated 425 cyclists and hundreds of volunteers and supporters on Saturday and Sunday.
    The annual two-day, cycling event features multiple route options for cyclists as they journey through northern New Mexico and its pueblos.
    The society aims to nearly $220,000 this year to support cutting-edge research and life-changing programs and services for people living with MS.
    Established in 1980, the National MS Society’s Bike MS program is the largest organized cycling series in the country with nearly 100 Bike MS rides offered nationwide in 2015.
    Last year, cyclists raised nearly $83 million to support MS research and programs delivered by the society’s 50-state network of chapters. Bike MS has raised over $1 billion since its inception. For cyclists and all those seeking a personal challenge and a world free of MS, Bike MS is the premier fundraising cycling series in the nation.

  • Since the Las Conchas fire, many areas of the Pajarito Plateau are in stream channel stabilization and floodplain restoration.
    To help in this effort, join Chick Keller to collect grass seeds and look at other interesting native plants. These seeds will be used next spring in the post-fire restoration project along Frijoles Creek near the Visitor Center in Bandelier National Monument.
    The project, managed by Keystone Restoration Ecology, is part of a New Mexico River Stewardship grant to protect New Mexico’s water quality and resources.
    Three seed collection hikes are currently scheduled. The first will be Friday, with more to follow on Sept. 12 and Oct. 10.
    The hikes will be as easy to moderate and the pace will be slow as the group gathers seeds. Bring water, lunch, a hat, sunscreen and good walking shoes. Hikes will be in various locations around the Bandelier National Monument Visitor Center and Campground areas. Admission cost to Bandelier is waived for participants.
    Participants are asked to meet 8 a.m. Friday at the Juniper Campground in Bandelier National Monument. Hiking time will depend on location, but each seed collection hike will last approximately half a day.

  • This time of year always excites me for what lies ahead.
    As you read this, Los Alamos County Council will have proclaimed the month of September as Assets In Action month, which kicks off a yearlong journey of asset building.
    Asset building for our youth is so very important and it is something that needs to begin at a young age and continue throughout high school. We as a community need to engage our youth and help grow into great adults.
    So when groups talk about what we are doing for youth and are we running enough programs, I say unless they contain the relationship building work of Assets throughout the program, the gains are small in comparison.
    Now back to Assets month! On Sept. 4, the community is asked to wear their favorite college or university shirt, or one that supports their branch of service.
    Our love of lifelong learning happens in many ways and in many places.
    Snap a photo of yourself, your co-workers, etc., and email it to Assets@att.net.
    Our annual Change for Change collection to benefit the Community Asset Awards will be at Morning Glory Bakery, Finishing Touch, Aspen Copies, Chamber of Commerce, Children’s Clinic, the Los Alamos Co-op Market and the Animal Clinic of Los Alamos.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Cupcake — A 4-year-old, calico who was recently surrendered. She is still adjusting to life at the shelter; as a result, she is a bit timid and shy. Shelter volunteers will continue working with Cupcake to bring out her fun side, and she’ll be ready for adoption in no time!
    Marshall — A 1-year-old, orange tabby, who was found roaming earlier this week. He’s really hoping that his family comes for him, but if not, he’ll head to the vet for a check-up before he heads home with a new family.

  • It is not uncommon for pets to be considered a part of the family, which is why they deserve to live the happiest and healthiest lives possible.
    While endless treats and belly rubs are some people’s idea of the perfect life for Fido, a more important factor plays into the quality of life your pet will have: their health.
    You may have already heard about the benefits of vaccinating your pet for common diseases, but educating yourself more on the subject is important before visiting the veterinarian’s office.
    Allowing vaccines to be a part of your pet’s health care routine can protect them from some of the most common companion animal diseases. Rabies, distemper, hepatitis, Bordetella, parvovirus and feline leukemia are a few of the illnesses that your pet can be protected against through the use of a vaccine.
    Dr. Brad Bennett, lecturer at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explains how a vaccine can be effective in reducing your pet’s chances of developing a disease. “In developing immunity, vaccines work by mimicking the infection.

  • Aug. 16-22, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken parmesan
    12:15 p.m.        Smart Driver Course
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety training
    10 a.m.        Low Vision/Hearing-Speaker with Lesley Olsher
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Hot dog
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1:30 p.m.        “Friends” meeting
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis

  • One of Los Alamos’ greatest living treasures has a long story to tell about World War II.
    Bill Hudson turned 90 years old in May and continues to fill the community with knowledge of a past long gone but never forgotten.
    The recently released book, “Fighting the Unbeatable Foe,” by Karen Tallentire, chronicles Hudson’s time on the island of Iwo Jima in graphic detail.
    Hudson, born William Alfred Hudson, was raised in Manhattan and comes from a long line of military men, stemming back to his great-grandfather, Robert Jefferson Hudson, who fought in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.
    His father William Alonzo Hudson fought during World War I for the Navy. His brother served in the Army from 1947-1948. His sons also served in the military. His son, William James Hudson, was in the Navy from 1969-1973 and Ty Manon Hudson was a Marine from 1981-1987.
    Hudson himself joined the Marines in 1943 when he reached age 18. He said it was better that he volunteered to join the Corps than be drafted into the Army.
    Before enlisting, he was clean living and athletic and hung around people of the same likes. He was a non-smoker and non-drinker.

  • Irene Powell has been a volunteer at many places around Los Alamos, predominately as the director of the Los Alamos Volunteer Association (LAVA), which she retired from earlier this month.
    Although she said she loves volunteering, “it was time to retire.”
    She now wants to devote her time to traveling. Powell and her family recently returned from a trip to the Grand Canyon, which occurred immediately after her last day as LAVA’s director.
    She is not, however, giving up volunteering entirely. She remains active at United Church and the Red Cross.
    The Betty Ehart Senior Center held a Hawaiian-themed going away party for Powell on Aug. 6.
    “I have always felt strongly about volunteer work. She had worked as the volunteer director for Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization the past nine years, which she said was a wonderful job.
    “Helping seniors find volunteer opportunities with nonprofits was a very rewarding occupation,” she said. “I also enjoyed working with the staff there at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. They are very dedicated to the seniors in this community.”