.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • If Halloween is spooky for you, just think of it from a dog’s perspective: Costumed creatures, sugary treats and things that go “boo” in the night — oh my. These simple precautions from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter, however, can make the festive event fun.
    • Watch out for candy. Chocolate in all forms can be very dangerous to dogs and cats. And some candies contain the artificial sweetener xylitol, which can also cause problems. Pumpkins and corn might not be life-threatening but can upset stomachs.
    • Lighted pumpkins are fun but be careful that Fido doesn’t knock over all your work and start a fire. And curious kittens run the risk of getting burned by candles.
    • Dress-up can be fun for critters, but not all of them love it as much as you do. Watch the stress level, and only put on costumes that don’t restrict movement or hearing or impede the ability to breathe, bark or meow. Consider a colorful bandanna if all else fails.
    • Keep dogs and cats in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be stressful.
    • If you can’t resist bringing your critter along for trick-or-treating, make sure he or she can be seen from the road.

  • Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra fans are in for a treat this year when the orchestra welcomes premier cello soloist Wendy Warner to the stage Nov. 4, at Crossroads Bible Church. 

    Together, with longtime friend and LASO Conductor David Chavez, they will present the Saint-Sens Concerto No. 1.

    Warner came to fame when she made her debut with the Chicago Symphony at 14. In 1990, she won the top prize at the Fourth Annual Rostropovich Competition four years later.

    Chavez first met Warner when he was playing with the then New Mexico Symphony Orchestra. At the time, she was a guest soloist, performing a cello concerto by Dvorak.

    “Wendy and I have sustained a wonderful friendship over the years, and I am lucky to have kept my relationship with her,” Chavez said.

    This season, Warner has performed with orchestras and musical groups in China and Peru. In the U.S. she has performed with symphonies in Wichita Kansas and other places in the U.S.

    When she’s not traveling, she teaches music at the Schwob School of Music in Columbus, Geogia.

  • TODAY
    Trick–or–Treat on MainStreet will haunt downtown Los Alamos again on from 4-6 p.m. During the event, Main Street and Central Avenue, from 15th to 20th Streets, are closed to auto traffic and become a safe pedestrian area where local businesses and organizations distribute candy to costumed families. At 4 p.m., LAHS Olions will present live statues; 4:30 p.m. performance by High Flyers; 5 p.m. performance by Dance Arts Los Alamos; 5:30 p.m. Pet Costume Parade.

    Knights of Columbus Haunted House from 6-10 p.m. at 104 DP Road. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for kids, under age 4 are free.

    Pajarito Prewpub and Grill Costume Party with live music by the Bus Tapes from 8 p.m.-midnight. Ages 21 and older.

    Los Alamos Teen Center Halloween Party.

    Sugar Skull Painting Event from 6:30-9 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room.

    High Tech Halloween from 4-6 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    Gentle Walks
 at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.
    SATURDAY
    Acid Canyon Clean-up Day
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Join the County’s Open Space Specialist and other volunteers to clean up the leftover fencing below the nature center in Acid Canyon. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • The Los Alamos Retirement Community will host a Fall Prevention Presentation from 2-3 p.m. Nov. 9 at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court, in Los Alamos.
    The informative presentation about preventing injury will include speakers Donna McHenry, an EMS, Pauline Schneider, the senior center director, and Cynthia Goldblatt, the community liaison of the Los Alamos Retirement Community.
    The community is invited the event. Refreshments will be served and RSVP is required. Contact Goldblatt at 695-8981 for information. 

  • In recognition of World Polio Day Tuesday, members of the Rotary Club of Los Alamos visited local elementary schools Oct. 19 to raise money for polio eradication.
    In 1985, Rotary International began raising funds in an effort to eliminate polio worldwide. Polio has not been a problem in the United States for many years, but this is not the case in many developing countries.
    By partnering with the World Health Organization and other government and private groups, Rotary International has achieved a 99 percent reduction of polio worldwide. Rotary Club of Los Alamos has participated in this effort from the beginning. Presently, through the Purple Pinkie Project, the club wishes to make students in the Los Alamos Public School District part of the effort to eradicate Polio.
    Since $1 is the estimated cost to immunize one child from polio, local students were encouraged to bring $1 or more to help with this cause. Each time a student put $1 in the Purple Pinkie Bucket, Rotarians painted his or her pinkie with Gentian Violet as a symbol of one child immunized from polio.

  • Communication is key in every relationship or level of leadership, if you have any chance for things to go smoothly.
    This week is Red Ribbon Week, which is a weeklong drug prevention messaging week. The ideas are generally simple like wearing red, hugs not drugs or too smart to start.
    You might not think that the messaging matters, but the truth is if we say nothing, that strategy is sure to work against you.
    We need to speak with our children and speak often about the choices they make and how those choices can make a difference in their lives.
    I don’t mean talking to them in a preachy, “When I was your age,” kind of way, I mean using the instances we see in our daily lives that bring the simple messaging into a real-world perspective.
    You can’t always choose their friends, their mates or their jobs, even though many will try. Always try to help them on the path when they ask questions or come to you for advice.
    You may not always have the answers, but one of the luxuries of being surrounded by all this tech is that so many resources are at your fingertips.
    The opioid crisis which seems to be all over the news every day is one topic to have a conversation about, you can avoid it, but it will not avoid our children.

  • Come out to visit the Los Alamos Monitor’s scarecrow “Scoops Byline” and all of the other creations taking part in the Scarecrow Contest on Central Avenue. 

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Los Alamos Mountaineers are partnering to offer a road ride from Jemez Springs to the Gilman Tunnels and back on Sunday.
    Join Ross Lemons on a paved ride to enjoy fall colors, great company, and colorful geology.
    This trip is a bicycle ride on paved roads from Jemez Springs to the Gilman Tunnels and back. The Gilman tunnels are located in the most scenic section of the Guadalupe River Box and were originally blasted out of the rock in the 1920’s for a logging railroad.
    The cottonwoods along the route should be near the peak of their fall colors, making it a most beautiful ride. The total distance is about 29 miles with around 700 feet of elevation gain on way out and about 600 feet on the way back. The rock is a Precambrian crystalline matrix that is pinkish in color making it a popular area for technical climbing. 
    This is an out-and-back ride along N.M. 4 to Highway 485 and Highway 376 to the tunnels, with an option for those who prefer a shorter ride. The group should be back in Jemez Springs by about 12:30 p.m. where those who would like can have lunch at a local restaurant.

  • The annual Los Alamos CROP Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot traditionally asks local children to design a logo for the event t-shirt. This year’s logo artist is Jasmine Tierney, a seventh-grader at Los Alamos Middle School. 
    Tierney created a fun image for a local Dog Jog t-shirt and was asked to design the hunger walk shirt, as well. Tierney lives in Los Alamos with her mother Heidi Morris. When asked about her interests, Tierney said she enjoys helping others, as well as drawing and playing piano and cello. 
    The t-shirt design Tierney submitted shows an energetic stalk of corn and a friendly tomato walking along the Hunger Walk path, with trees on either side and our mountains in view. The cornstalk is leading a happy dog, looking very much like Sabrina, Jasmine’s own beloved pet.
    In recognition of her artistic efforts, Tierney will receive a free t-shirt, a small gift, public recognition and, of course, the honor of having her logo design printed on scores of t-shirts. The shirts will be handed-out to participants in the annual Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot on Nov. 19.

  • The sixth-annual Conference of the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico will focus on breakthroughs and incremental improvements in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment.
    The all-day conference, hosted by the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico (PCSANM, pcsanm.org), is a free event and will be from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 4 at Sandia Prep, 532 Osuna Road NE, in Albuquerque.
    This year’s event is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Peter Lindberg, of Los Alamos, who for about 40 years treated numerous prostate cancer patients in New Mexico. He died in September 2016.
    “This is a good opportunity for men making up our target audience – those over 40, and especially over 50, along with their partners, family, and friends – to spend some time learning about what could be live-saving information,” says Steve Denning, board chair of PCSANM.
    About one in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetimes. Between 1,300 men are diagnosed each year in New Mexico.
    National Cancer Society 2015 statistics also show that African-American men are more likely (about one in five vs. one in seven) to contract the disease than other ethnic groups.

  • Horses are beautiful and strong creatures, but they still depend on their owners to keep them healthy.
    One disease horse owners should be aware of is Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA), a virus that can destroy red blood cells, causing weakness, anemia, and death.
    Michelle Coleman, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how the disease is spread.
    “EIA is an infectious viral disease,” Coleman said. “The most common mode of transmission of EIA is by the transfer of virus-infected blood-feeding insects, such as horse flies. It can also be transmitted through the use of blood-contaminated syringes, surgical equipment, or the transfusion of infected blood or blood products. Although uncommon, transmission can also occur through the placenta in infected mares.”
     There is no treatment, or safe and effective vaccine, available for this disease, so horses that are positive for EIA should be isolated from other horses.
    Most horses infected with EIA also do not show any signs of illness or disease, so it is important to constantly maintain good hygiene and disinfection principles, such as controlling insects in the horse’s environment. 

  • In the cat world, this week’s pet is known as a team player.
    Mando, a year-old Siamese with crème and seal point highlights, will be there when you start your next project or putting the finishing touches on your last one. He loves to know what is going on around him.
    According to the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, where he currently resides, he also has some tricks up his furry sleeve. Apparently he rolls over on command – or he often does, because he’s still a cat.
    He checks all the positive boxes: good with kids, housebroken, and he’s indoor only. He doesn’t seem to mind dogs – perhaps he appreciates them for their entertainment value – and he likes other cats.
    His blue eyes are hypnotic and usually upon you. He’s adorable and attentive. Available for recruitment, so sign him up.
    Please contact the County Animal Shelter 662-8179 or email at Police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • Los Alamos Little Theater will hold auditions for the January 2018 production, “God of Carnage” at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St., at 2 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Monday.
    “God of Carnage “ by Yasmina Reza won the 2009 Tony Award for Best Play.
    In this dark comedy a playground altercation between eleven-year-old boys brings together two sets of Brooklyn parents for a meeting to resolve the matter.
    At first, diplomatic niceties are observed, but as the meeting progresses, and the rum flows, tensions emerge and the gloves come off, leaving the couples with more than just their liberal principles in tatters.  Characters will be two men and two women.
    The play will be directed by Paul Lewis and produced by John Gustafson.
    Actors should prepare a short two- to three-minute monologue of their choosing, or select one of the suggested monologues at lalt.org.  
    Memorization is not necessary, but the actor must be sufficiently familiar with the monologue to present a dramatic interpretation.
    Copies of the script and suggested monologues are available for two day checkout at the Mesa Public Library (reference desk). 

  • ALAMOGORDO (AP) — A new craze has hit Alamogordo, one that involves residents of all ages painting and hiding rocks throughout the community.
    “My sister lives in Illinois and they do the rock thing there, she was telling me about it. I thought it would be neat for kids here because there’s not a lot for kids to do around here,” said Patricia Glore, founder of the Alamo Rocks Facebook page. “So we painted rocks for two weeks, hid about 50 of them and then I started the page.”
    As residents found the hidden rocks, they also found instructions painted to the back of the rocks directing them to the Alamo Rocks page. Currently, the group has over 2,300 members.
    “This is something I do with my great grandkids,” Glore said. “(My great grandson) found his first rock by himself yesterday and he was so excited. This gives them something to do outside of the house, so they’re not stuck indoors playing on tablets and watching TV.”
    Organizations such as the Alamogordo Public Library and Alamo Jump have jumped onboard with the craze, hosting rock painting parties for the community.

  • The Los Alamos Big Band will host a Fall Concert and Dance from 7-9 p.m. Oct. 27 at Fuller Lodge.
    The Los Alamos Big Band is a 16-instrument, 1940s, Glenn Miller-style swing band that plays for public events, weddings, conventions, fund raisers, and more. The band will be playing favorites such as “In The Mood,” “String of Pearls,” “Sing, Sing, Sing,” “New York, New York,” and even “Clarinet Polka.”
    The band also features two well-known vocalists, Elisa Enriquez and Rene LeClaire, who will perform famous tunes such as “Chicago,” “Fly Me to the Moon,” “Lady is a Tramp,” and “Moonglow.”
    The band has been playing at dances throughout Northern New Mexico since 1984 under the direction of Jan McDonald, who was for many years the band director at Los Alamos High School. Admission is free; donations are welcome.
    For more information, contact Dean Decker at deandecker4@aol.com. 

  • This is the second in a two-part series on Austria. Part one appeared in the Oct. 11 edition of Diversion and can now be found at lamonitor.com.

  • Some people can tell fall is coming when the leaves begin to turn and the temperature drops. But if they’re into fiber arts, fall is when the Taos Wool Festival comes to town.
    The 34th annual festival, which celebrates all things wool, from shearing sheep to making yarn and clothing, happened in Taos Oct. 7 and 8 at Kit Carson Park. Sponsored and organized by the Mountain and Valley Wool Association, over 63 vendors came from New Mexico, Colorado and Texas to show people what they got and to demonstrate their skills.
    Besides vendors, the festival also featured contests and demonstrations throughout the weekend. Saturday morning featured a yarn show competition, a garment and home accessories and fleece competition.
    The festival also featured a wool and fleece sale. Sunday featured a spinning, knitting and crochet contest, a hand-dye competition and a silent auction. The silent auction was a fundraiser for the Mountain Valley Wool Association that will help cover the costs of this year’s festival.
    The first festival was held in 1984 at the park, and featured just 15 vendors. It’s become much bigger since then.

  • Los Alamos community members are invited to partner up with the Carson National Forest and Taos County Saturday for cleanup of Miranda Canyon.
    The cleanup will take place from 9 a.m.-noon at the canyon, which is located on the Camino Real Ranger District.
    According to a news release, the area has often been used as a dumping ground in the past and is now inundated with household trash, construction debris and discarded furniture.
    Those wishing to volunteer with county and National Forest personnel are asked to meet at the Llano Quemado Community Center at 9 a.m. for a safety talk.
    Following that, the group will start making its way up the canyon for trash removal. The group plans to return to the community center at 12:15 p.m., where lunch will be provided for all participants.
    Those wanting to volunteer are asked to wear long sleeves, pants and sturdy shoes, and bring gloves and water. 
    The Carson National Forest purchased the 5,000 acres of land in Miranda Canyon from the Trust for Public Land using land and water conservation funds in order to protect the watershed from private land development.
    The area is south of Taos, just west of Picuris Peak.
     

  • Coming up this weekend, the Jemez Mountain Trail Sale will draw more than 150 vendors and leaf peepers to the Jemez Valley to sell and buy new and used items.
    Along with the sale, that will be from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, shoppers and onlookers can enjoy priceless views of the changing fall colors along the Jemez Mountain Trail Scenic Byway.
    The 14th annual Jemez Mountain Trail Sale – the longest yard sale in New Mexico – begins at San Ysidro near the intersection of N.M. 550 and N.M. 4 and continues 12 miles past Jemez Springs to La Cueva.
    The Longest Yard Sale covers more than 30 miles.
    Off N.M. 4, the sale continues along the highway near Gilman Tunnels and the highway near Ponderosa.
    A map of all “cluster” locations is available on Facebook at JemezMountainTrailSale.
    There is no charge to set up a table at a cluster location.
    Sellers are asked to register in advance with cluster contacts. For contact information and details, email joybandy@gmail.com.
    Items for sale range from pueblo pottery and jewelry to books, appliances and much more.
    The Trail Sale is also a great fundraising opportunity for nonprofit organizations.
    Drivers must obey speed limits and watch for sightseers and pedestrians along N.M. 4.

  • The Karen Wray Gallery is delighted to invite you to “Phillip Noll, The Four Corners: A Photographic Exhibition,” October 20 through November 19, 2017, with an Opening Reception Friday, October 20 from 5-7pm.

    What does “The Four Corners” mean to you? Is it the common point of four intersecting territories? Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring? North, East, South, and West? Earth, Water, Air, and Fire? Morning, Evening, Day, and Night? Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah?

    For award-winning photographer Phillip Noll, it means all these things. For the past two decades Phillip has been building a portfolio of images representing “The Four Corners.” Predominantly from the Colorado Plateau, these images will take you on a visual journey from deserts to forests, from mountains to canyons, from red rocks to waterfalls, and from the grand landscape to tiny details. “The photographs in this exhibition represent the amazing beauty of this region of the United States. The Four Corners area is absolutely filled with breathtaking scenery. All you have to do is look for it,” says Phillip.