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Features

  • Fees at many recreation sites and amenities at the Santa Fe National Forest will be waived over Veterans Day weekend on Saturday and Sunday.

    Fees at all national forests and grasslands will be waived at many day-use sites, such as picnic grounds and developed trailheads, in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act.

    Other agencies also participating in the fee-free days including the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Managements and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    The fee-free availability includes sites in the Santa Fe National Forest which normally charge day-use fees and campgrounds. Site on the National Reservation System are not fee-free, according to a press release from the Santa Fe National Forest.

    If you plan to visit, “know before you go,” by checking the weather forecast and being prepared for seasonal fluctuations.

    Follow basic safety precautions for hiking, fishing and camping in the national forest.

    Although fire danger is somewhat lower, campfire safety and prevention is always a priority while outdoors, according to the press release.

    Never leave a campfire unattended and make sure it is out and cold before leaving your campsite.

  • The Los Alamos VFW Post 8874 will hold a Veterans Day Ceremony at 11 a.m. at Ashley Pond to honor veterans Saturday. The special ceremony will include a color guard and trumpet player.

    Following the ceremony, the public is invited to the VFW for a celebration, at 1793 Deacon St., Los Alamos.
    The American Legion Frank G. Frainier Post 90 in Los Alamos is planning a steak dinner and live music night on Veterans Day Saturday.

    Legion members, the public and anyone eligible for membership is welcome for the steak dinner that starts at 4 p.m. in the dining hall at 1325 Trinity Drive, said Commander Linda Fox.

    The dinner costs $15 for a ribeye steak, loaded baked potato, salad, roll, dessert and soft drink. To reserve a dinner, call the American Legion at 662-7772 before 8 p.m. Thursday.

    Following the dinner, members and anyone eligible to join the legion – which includes anyone who was in the military, or parents, or siblings of those in the military – can stay for the live music that starts at 6 p.m. in the bar area.

    Bat Bennett, a well-known musician, will play his special mix of tunes in the bar.

    “People really get involved,” Fox said. “He’s really a very good entertainer.”

  • The Los Alamos County Ice Rink’s is set to open its winter season with a free skating lessons event at 11:30 a.m. Nov. 15.

    Free mini-skating lessons will be free for children 10 and under from 1:30–2 p.m. and children  11 to adult can try free lessons from 2:15–2:45 p.m.

    Registration for skate lessons is now open online or available at the Walkup Aquatic Center.

    Prior to opening day, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us (click on Recreation) or email lacrec@lacnm.us for more information.

  • By MATT O'BRIEN, AP Technology Writer

    Don't throw away your Stephen King collection just yet. But the Master of the Macabre might want to keep an eye out behind him, because scientists have just unleashed a nightmare machine on a mission to churn out its own bone-chilling tales.

    MIT researchers have applied the electrodes and brought to life a new fiction-writing bot they call Shelley — after "Frankenstein" author Mary Shelley. To keep the bot busy — no wandering the countryside terrorizing villagers! — the team gave it a crash course in the horror genre, forcing it to read 140,000 stories published by amateur writers on a popular online forum.

    Now Shelley's artificial neural network is generating its own stories , posting opening lines on Twitter, then taking turns with humans in collaborative storytelling.

    COLD, CALCULATING HORROR

    "She's creating really interesting and weird stories that have never really existed in the horror genre," said Pinar Yanardag, a postdoctoral researcher at the MIT Media Lab. One strange tale, for instance, involved a pregnant man who woke up in a hospital.

  • Here are the newest members of the community born at Los Alamos Medical Center:

    Oct 19: A boy, Leo Timothy Uhlenbrock, was born to Emily and Kyle Uhlenbrock.

    Oct. 20: A boy, Owen Iefan Griffith, was born to Lauren and Gareth Griffith.

    Oct. 22: A boy, Tycho Rook Lanza Williams, was born to Nina Lanza and Richard Williams.

  • Children and adults may love the spooky traditions of Halloween, but our pets are less likely to appreciate the costumes, masks and parties associated with Halloween night.

    Kit Darling, infection control coordinator at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, recommended a few tips to keep your pet safe this Halloween.

    “Keep candy secure from pets,” Darling said. “Many candies are toxic to pets, such as chocolates. Candies and gum containing the sugar-free sweetener xylitol are also toxic.”

    Additionally, lollipops and other candies with plastic wrappers can cause intestinal blockage if ingested, Darling said. Be sure to clean up candy trash and store candy on a high shelf to prevent pets from reaching it.

    Other items to keep away from your pets include candles, pumpkins, pumpkin seeds, corn, lights and electrical cords.

    These objects are a hazard if consumed or chewed on by your pet. If you suspect your pet has ingested a dangerous item, Darling recommended contacting the Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 or your veterinarian.

    Pet owners may want to dress their pet for Halloween night, but this may not be the best idea. Darling said pets shouldn’t be dressed in costume unless you know they are comfortable wearing the outfit.

  • Powerball didn’t work out for you this week. You picked the wrong color combo for your unicorn look. They closed the highway before you got through the construction zone.

    There’s bad luck all over.

    Here’s a tip.

    The puppy Morello over at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter could be the best thing that’s happened to you in quite awhile.

    His charm is his youth, and potential.

    A mixed breed with terrier traits, he’s a small puppy likely to reach medium proportions.

    He’s got a cute ear fold happening and appears genuinely interested in what comes next.

    He’s got some of his shots, not all, and he’ll need boosters.

    Consider making Morello part of your universe. Bad luck doesn’t last long when you’ve got a friend.

    Please contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179 or email at Police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • If Halloween is spooky for you, just think of it from a dog’s perspective: Costumed creatures, sugary treats and things that go “boo” in the night — oh my. These simple precautions from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter, however, can make the festive event fun.
    • Watch out for candy. Chocolate in all forms can be very dangerous to dogs and cats. And some candies contain the artificial sweetener xylitol, which can also cause problems. Pumpkins and corn might not be life-threatening but can upset stomachs.
    • Lighted pumpkins are fun but be careful that Fido doesn’t knock over all your work and start a fire. And curious kittens run the risk of getting burned by candles.
    • Dress-up can be fun for critters, but not all of them love it as much as you do. Watch the stress level, and only put on costumes that don’t restrict movement or hearing or impede the ability to breathe, bark or meow. Consider a colorful bandanna if all else fails.
    • Keep dogs and cats in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be stressful.
    • If you can’t resist bringing your critter along for trick-or-treating, make sure he or she can be seen from the road.

  • Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra fans are in for a treat this year when the orchestra welcomes premier cello soloist Wendy Warner to the stage Nov. 4, at Crossroads Bible Church. 

    Together, with longtime friend and LASO Conductor David Chavez, they will present the Saint-Sens Concerto No. 1.

    Warner came to fame when she made her debut with the Chicago Symphony at 14. In 1990, she won the top prize at the Fourth Annual Rostropovich Competition four years later.

    Chavez first met Warner when he was playing with the then New Mexico Symphony Orchestra. At the time, she was a guest soloist, performing a cello concerto by Dvorak.

    “Wendy and I have sustained a wonderful friendship over the years, and I am lucky to have kept my relationship with her,” Chavez said.

    This season, Warner has performed with orchestras and musical groups in China and Peru. In the U.S. she has performed with symphonies in Wichita Kansas and other places in the U.S.

    When she’s not traveling, she teaches music at the Schwob School of Music in Columbus, Geogia.

  • TODAY
    Trick–or–Treat on MainStreet will haunt downtown Los Alamos again on from 4-6 p.m. During the event, Main Street and Central Avenue, from 15th to 20th Streets, are closed to auto traffic and become a safe pedestrian area where local businesses and organizations distribute candy to costumed families. At 4 p.m., LAHS Olions will present live statues; 4:30 p.m. performance by High Flyers; 5 p.m. performance by Dance Arts Los Alamos; 5:30 p.m. Pet Costume Parade.

    Knights of Columbus Haunted House from 6-10 p.m. at 104 DP Road. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for kids, under age 4 are free.

    Pajarito Prewpub and Grill Costume Party with live music by the Bus Tapes from 8 p.m.-midnight. Ages 21 and older.

    Los Alamos Teen Center Halloween Party.

    Sugar Skull Painting Event from 6:30-9 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room.

    High Tech Halloween from 4-6 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    Gentle Walks
 at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.
    SATURDAY
    Acid Canyon Clean-up Day
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Join the County’s Open Space Specialist and other volunteers to clean up the leftover fencing below the nature center in Acid Canyon. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • The Los Alamos Retirement Community will host a Fall Prevention Presentation from 2-3 p.m. Nov. 9 at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court, in Los Alamos.
    The informative presentation about preventing injury will include speakers Donna McHenry, an EMS, Pauline Schneider, the senior center director, and Cynthia Goldblatt, the community liaison of the Los Alamos Retirement Community.
    The community is invited the event. Refreshments will be served and RSVP is required. Contact Goldblatt at 695-8981 for information. 

  • In recognition of World Polio Day Tuesday, members of the Rotary Club of Los Alamos visited local elementary schools Oct. 19 to raise money for polio eradication.
    In 1985, Rotary International began raising funds in an effort to eliminate polio worldwide. Polio has not been a problem in the United States for many years, but this is not the case in many developing countries.
    By partnering with the World Health Organization and other government and private groups, Rotary International has achieved a 99 percent reduction of polio worldwide. Rotary Club of Los Alamos has participated in this effort from the beginning. Presently, through the Purple Pinkie Project, the club wishes to make students in the Los Alamos Public School District part of the effort to eradicate Polio.
    Since $1 is the estimated cost to immunize one child from polio, local students were encouraged to bring $1 or more to help with this cause. Each time a student put $1 in the Purple Pinkie Bucket, Rotarians painted his or her pinkie with Gentian Violet as a symbol of one child immunized from polio.

  • Communication is key in every relationship or level of leadership, if you have any chance for things to go smoothly.
    This week is Red Ribbon Week, which is a weeklong drug prevention messaging week. The ideas are generally simple like wearing red, hugs not drugs or too smart to start.
    You might not think that the messaging matters, but the truth is if we say nothing, that strategy is sure to work against you.
    We need to speak with our children and speak often about the choices they make and how those choices can make a difference in their lives.
    I don’t mean talking to them in a preachy, “When I was your age,” kind of way, I mean using the instances we see in our daily lives that bring the simple messaging into a real-world perspective.
    You can’t always choose their friends, their mates or their jobs, even though many will try. Always try to help them on the path when they ask questions or come to you for advice.
    You may not always have the answers, but one of the luxuries of being surrounded by all this tech is that so many resources are at your fingertips.
    The opioid crisis which seems to be all over the news every day is one topic to have a conversation about, you can avoid it, but it will not avoid our children.

  • Come out to visit the Los Alamos Monitor’s scarecrow “Scoops Byline” and all of the other creations taking part in the Scarecrow Contest on Central Avenue. 

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Los Alamos Mountaineers are partnering to offer a road ride from Jemez Springs to the Gilman Tunnels and back on Sunday.
    Join Ross Lemons on a paved ride to enjoy fall colors, great company, and colorful geology.
    This trip is a bicycle ride on paved roads from Jemez Springs to the Gilman Tunnels and back. The Gilman tunnels are located in the most scenic section of the Guadalupe River Box and were originally blasted out of the rock in the 1920’s for a logging railroad.
    The cottonwoods along the route should be near the peak of their fall colors, making it a most beautiful ride. The total distance is about 29 miles with around 700 feet of elevation gain on way out and about 600 feet on the way back. The rock is a Precambrian crystalline matrix that is pinkish in color making it a popular area for technical climbing. 
    This is an out-and-back ride along N.M. 4 to Highway 485 and Highway 376 to the tunnels, with an option for those who prefer a shorter ride. The group should be back in Jemez Springs by about 12:30 p.m. where those who would like can have lunch at a local restaurant.

  • The annual Los Alamos CROP Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot traditionally asks local children to design a logo for the event t-shirt. This year’s logo artist is Jasmine Tierney, a seventh-grader at Los Alamos Middle School. 
    Tierney created a fun image for a local Dog Jog t-shirt and was asked to design the hunger walk shirt, as well. Tierney lives in Los Alamos with her mother Heidi Morris. When asked about her interests, Tierney said she enjoys helping others, as well as drawing and playing piano and cello. 
    The t-shirt design Tierney submitted shows an energetic stalk of corn and a friendly tomato walking along the Hunger Walk path, with trees on either side and our mountains in view. The cornstalk is leading a happy dog, looking very much like Sabrina, Jasmine’s own beloved pet.
    In recognition of her artistic efforts, Tierney will receive a free t-shirt, a small gift, public recognition and, of course, the honor of having her logo design printed on scores of t-shirts. The shirts will be handed-out to participants in the annual Hunger Walk and Turkey Trot on Nov. 19.

  • The sixth-annual Conference of the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico will focus on breakthroughs and incremental improvements in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment.
    The all-day conference, hosted by the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico (PCSANM, pcsanm.org), is a free event and will be from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 4 at Sandia Prep, 532 Osuna Road NE, in Albuquerque.
    This year’s event is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Peter Lindberg, of Los Alamos, who for about 40 years treated numerous prostate cancer patients in New Mexico. He died in September 2016.
    “This is a good opportunity for men making up our target audience – those over 40, and especially over 50, along with their partners, family, and friends – to spend some time learning about what could be live-saving information,” says Steve Denning, board chair of PCSANM.
    About one in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetimes. Between 1,300 men are diagnosed each year in New Mexico.
    National Cancer Society 2015 statistics also show that African-American men are more likely (about one in five vs. one in seven) to contract the disease than other ethnic groups.

  • Horses are beautiful and strong creatures, but they still depend on their owners to keep them healthy.
    One disease horse owners should be aware of is Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA), a virus that can destroy red blood cells, causing weakness, anemia, and death.
    Michelle Coleman, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how the disease is spread.
    “EIA is an infectious viral disease,” Coleman said. “The most common mode of transmission of EIA is by the transfer of virus-infected blood-feeding insects, such as horse flies. It can also be transmitted through the use of blood-contaminated syringes, surgical equipment, or the transfusion of infected blood or blood products. Although uncommon, transmission can also occur through the placenta in infected mares.”
     There is no treatment, or safe and effective vaccine, available for this disease, so horses that are positive for EIA should be isolated from other horses.
    Most horses infected with EIA also do not show any signs of illness or disease, so it is important to constantly maintain good hygiene and disinfection principles, such as controlling insects in the horse’s environment. 

  • In the cat world, this week’s pet is known as a team player.
    Mando, a year-old Siamese with crème and seal point highlights, will be there when you start your next project or putting the finishing touches on your last one. He loves to know what is going on around him.
    According to the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, where he currently resides, he also has some tricks up his furry sleeve. Apparently he rolls over on command – or he often does, because he’s still a cat.
    He checks all the positive boxes: good with kids, housebroken, and he’s indoor only. He doesn’t seem to mind dogs – perhaps he appreciates them for their entertainment value – and he likes other cats.
    His blue eyes are hypnotic and usually upon you. He’s adorable and attentive. Available for recruitment, so sign him up.
    Please contact the County Animal Shelter 662-8179 or email at Police-psa@lacnm.us.