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Features

  • Santa Fe
    Chocolate Maven — food service, 821 San Mateo, Unit C
    Date inspected: Feb. 25
    Violations: Eleven total violations (Level of violation not specified): Light in prep area unprotected. Missing base covering in various areas. Opening in wall around storage area door. Ceiling not smooth, plaster coating ruptured with fiberglass exposed in prep area. No sanitizer test kits. Peeling paint on wall near hot holding area. Worn paint at front service area. Inadequate light in prep areas. Rafters and utility lines exposed not easy to clean. Hand sink access difficult with equipment close by. Service area hand sink is in poor condition. Last two violations were corrected.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

  • Recruitment day for volunteers will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 15.
    Volunteers are an integral part of the Spanish Colonial Arts Society and the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art.
    The museum rely on the dedication and commitment of volunteers to help in a multitude of ways and we offer a wide range of volunteer opportunities, including events such as Spanish Market, in offices, and in the gift shop. Volunteers are invaluable to making the Society and Museum function smoothly.
    Volunteer positions are now open to all individuals who are willing to commit. The musuem suggest that volunteers become Society members so they will receive all mailings about the changing exhibitions and ongoing activities within the various departments. As members, volunteers also receive discounts on
    Museum lectures, in the Museum Shop and will receive invitations to special events.
    Almost all departments throughout the Society need volunteers to be an indispensable addition to their staff. If needed, training is provided by the staff.   

  • Twirl Toy Store and Playspace in Taos has been named by CNN as one of the “15 Best Spots for Kids” in America. Twirl is in good company, alongside the country’s top kid-friendly attractions such as Legoland (Calif.), Wizarding World of Harry Potter (Fla.) and American Museum of Natural History (N.Y.), among others.
     The selections stem from Gogobot Traveler’s Favorites awards, which is based on user recommendations and the number of visits by the site’s 3.7 million users. The list includes only those kids friendly attractions which were also fun for adults.

  • Dubbed as the No. 1 “spiritual center” in the United States by Travel and Escape Magazine (2012), Taos will also be the peaceful center of the 19th annual “Global Peace Walk” until April 22, hosted by Turtle Compassion, a nonprofit organization based in Taos. 
    Among many activities, newly elected Taos Mayor Dan Barrone is expected to read this year’s Global Peace Zone proclamation at noon on Earth Day, April 22.  
    “Our goal is to bring light to the darkness of our society and stand together as one global family supporting each other to successfully manifest our highest potentials,” said Global Peace Walk coordinator, Wendy Mason-Sherwood. “Global peace is a prayer for future generations and it is our last resolve as human beings. If this message of peace spreads throughout the globe, then the earth will become peaceful.”

  • As a little girl growing up in Kentucky, I was always surrounded by interesting cars. One of my grandfathers was a mechanic and owned a small garage in a tiny town called Midway.
    I have fond memories of conversing with the customers, swindling free bubble gum and riding my bike in the gravel outside the garage.
    Occasionally, I would have the honor of being his helper. Grandpa would have both hands under the hood of a car, shouting out the name of the tool he needed. I would revel in the praise I received when I handed him the correct one.
    My other grandpa collected and restored old Chevys, including a deep burgundy 1957 Chevy Wagon. One of his garages was filled with cars in various stages of restoration.
    Part of that garage was filled with his completed projects, all carefully covered in white drop clothes. The only time the covers were removed was during parade season and for the occasional, and very rare, Sunday drive.
    As I grew up and moved away, I lost touch with the car culture a bit. Don’t get me wrong, I can still spot a sexy car from a mile away and, luckily, the car culture in this state is alive and kicking. I simply admire from the comfort of my Toyota sedan, as I tour the interstates of New Mexico.

  • Native Treasures: Indian Arts Festival announces the artists, many of them related, whom will be participating in the festival this year. The current roster includes top painters, jewelers, potters, glass artists, sculptors, carvers and weavers who will showcase their work May 24–25 at the Santa Fe Convention Center.
    The festival benefits the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe.
    Jeweler, Victoria Adams, and her sister, Alexis Adams (both Southern Cheyenne/Arapaho), will make their first appearance at Native Treasures this year.
    Victoria Adams is well known for her detailed and refined jewelry designs. She recently branched out into handmade purses with sterling silver and gemstone decorations.
    Alexis Adams is a potter whose designs are influenced by the forms of her Cheyenne ancestors and the plants native to her home in the Sierra foothills of California. The result is a pottery style reminiscent of the Arts and Crafts movement.
    Mother and daughter, Mona and Charlene Laughing, (both Diné), are master weavers who regularly win first-place ribbons for their striking and colorful work at the Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard show in Phoenix. They have participated in Native Treasures for the last several years.

  •  

    Today

    “Sisters in Art — Sisters at Heart,” shows daily in the Portal Gallery of Fuller Lodge Art Center through April 26.  

    Thursday

    Los Alamos Farmers Market. 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. 

     

  •  

    The Project Management Institute was recently awarded Los Alamos resident John Jones PMI Region 7 volunteer of the year. Jones is a PMI chapter board member.

    The award recognized his contributions during the 2013 calendar year. 

    The board said that as vice president of programs, Jones had reached out to the membership of the Otowi Bridge PMI chapter, asking what changes they wanted.

    Based on membership responses, Jones initiated quarterly dinner meetings and arranged for high quality presenters at these events. 

    Jones also spearheaded New Mexico’s inaugural International Project Management Day (IPMD) event last November in collaboration with the Rio Grande chapter of PMI. 

  •  The Family Strength Network offers programs to help teens and young adults throughout the year. The next round of classes and workshops are available now for registration. Some classes are have been going on since the beginning of the year, however anyone may register for a session until the program ends. Anyone who can’t make the times listed can call 662-4515 or email fsn@lafsn.org to be notified of future classes.

  •  

    Artist and instructor Lisa Coddington’s class at PEEC last summer was well received, so Pajarito Environmental Education Center has welcomed Coddington back for another hands-on art workshop. 

    Participants will learn how to use drawing materials to portray animals such as those found at PEEC or around the Pajarito Plateau. The workshop will be from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, with a 30-minute break for lunch.

    With the class size limited to nine, Coddington will be able to work one-on-one with participants as they explore how to use pencil techniques to portray animals. Coddington will teach participants how to select a subject and start an animal portrait. This class is suggested for beginner and intermediate levels. Price is $45, or $36 for PEEC members. There is also a list of required art supplies, which participants will need to purchase separately. Village Arts will carry all the supplies and will offer a 10 percent discount to anyone who brings in the class list.

  • Activities kicked off at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center this week.
    From now until Friday, the aquatic center presents a Spring Fling at the pool. The obstacle course will be up and running every day from 1-3 p.m.
    The aquatic center supports its students, and offers a discount all week for youth from 1-4 p.m. Monday-Friday.
    The aquatic center also launches a new program on April 19. The in-pool egg hunt will begin at 1 p.m. Admission is $2.50/child, and all youth — ages 16 and under — are invited to hunt for
    some colorful eggs in the water. The limit is 150 youth, and all participants are invited to stary after and enjoy the pool.
    The Double Dive-In Feature will present “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2,” from 7 to 8:45 p.m. April 25. The lights are dimmed, the float toys are out, and the big theater-like screen will go up for the movie. Advance ticket sales are available at the aquatic centers front counter for $5.
    Admission includes treats, a glow necklace, and access to the pool during the movie.  
    At 9 p.m., the featured movie for teens will be “Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” and will include pizza sponsored by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and is free for all high schoolers.

  • Judging by the success of the Los Alamos High School Speech and Debate team, the coaches have a large part of the honor. Three coaches have recently been recognized both statewide and nationally.
    During the past year, all three have earned the Diamond Coach Award from the National Speech and Debate Association.
    The Diamond Coach Award reflects both excellence and longevity in coaching speech and debate. Of the 25 High School teams which compete in New Mexico and the 34 active coaches, only five have earned a Diamond Coach Award. Three of those five coaches are located here in Los Alamos.
    Margo Batha and Janet Newton are coaches of the LAHS Hilltalkers. Carolyn Connor is coach of the Jemez Mountain Homeschool Speech and Debate team.
    At the state level, the New Mexico Speech and Debate Association (NMSDA) is a professional association of educators and coaches representing public, private and charter schools statewide who are actively engaged in forensics education and high school-level speech and debate competition. 
    Each year the NMSDA awards Speech Coach of the Year and Debate Coach of the Year to two exemplary coaches. To be considered, coaches must be nominated, lead a successful program, and exhibit dedication, involvement and sportsmanship.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

  • “If everyone in the world had a neighbor like John, this would be a wonderful world.”
    Behind most endeavors is someone who just does his job, keeps things going, avoids the limelight – and is indispensable. Such a one is 2014 Living Treasure John Stewart.
    John was born in New York City and raised mostly in Richland, Washington, where his father worked at the Hanford Atomic Site. He graduated from Washington State College with a degree in psychology, but two years in the Army convinced him that a different specialty might enhance his job prospects. Returning to school, he earned a master’s degree in mathematics. He and Margaret married in 1955; a 60th wedding anniversary beckons. John hired on at the Los Alamos Laboratory in 1959 as a computer programmer (later system manager). He started working in an astronomy group, then oceanography, and ended with seismology.
    “When I retired, I didn’t know what to do with myself, what to keep me off the street.” John reached out to the community.

  • Throughout her life, 2014 Living Treasure Teralene (Terry) Foxx has felt close to nature. “When I
    was six, we moved to a wheat ranch in Idaho on the Little Camas Prairie. Every spring the Camas lilies bloomed. We would walk along the road and my mother would talk about the lilies or pick up a snake and let us touch it. That was my introduction”, Terry’s interest was cemented at the College of Idaho. There she took a seven- week camping field trip from Southern Idaho into Mexico, studying the flora and fauna of Mexico and the Southwest. Later she earned an MS in biology from Kansas State University.

    Terry and her husband Jim arrived in Los Alamos in 1969 with two daughters Alison and Erin.
    He had accepted a job as an inorganic chemist at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Their third
    daughter, Kerri, was born in Los Alamos. Terry credits the pull of Los Alamos’ natural setting as
    an immediate attraction. “I have a heart for the mountains. I never got use to the flatness of
    Kansas. It was a chance to come back home.”

  • The Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice is looking for people interested in assisting with the hospice program.
    Training will include diversity, confidentiality, psycho/social needs, family dynamics and meeting the needs of the individual patient.
    Orientation meeting will be noon to 1:30 p.m. May 7 at Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Office, 2202 Canyon Road.
    To reserve a space, call Visiting Nurses at 662-2525.  

  • The Hilltop Garden now has an official logo, which was designed by local resident Cayla Aikin.
    While Los Alamos County has issued a Request for Proposal and the Family YMCA has been awarded it, the county must still obtain federal permission for the specific land use.
    According to a press release, Los Alamos County is working with the Family YMCA to move this along as quickly as possible, but it will likely mean that using the land will be delayed for more months than originally thought.
    In the interim, the Y is pursuing plans for developing the space, as well as hosting an alternate site for this summer.
    The community is now free to help dream up ideas for the new garden.  Post any ideas to the Family YMCA Facebook page titled “The Family Y-Hilltop Garden”
    at facebook.com/HilltopGarden
    LosAlamos.
    The Y is currently considering about the kind of shade structure that would be ideal for Hilltop Garden.  

  • When Melissa Schmidt and her Aunt Brenda Kelley knew a change was needed, they created an opportunity for community discussion through a Facebook page called HOLLA, Hope and Love in Los Alamos, one they hope to see grow into a real force of encouragement in the community.
    The idea was born after becoming interested in a website that offers similar goals to what HOLLA hopes to do in Los Alamos and that is to offer hope and help. To Write Love on Her Arms, twloha.com, works to offer hope and help, while addressing the stigma of mental health issues.
    Born in Los Alamos in 1982, Schmidt went on to live in the big world, experiencing the heartaches of life, that many teens are forced to deal with.
    These struggles included the divorce of her parents and confronting issues of sexuality, which led to her dropping out of high school, her senior year.
    “Seriously, guys, stay in school, dropping out in January of your senior year is dumb, trust me,” Schmidt said and returned to get her diploma in 2003. “Now I see that my parents’ divorce was probably the best thing for me and my sisters, and being gay isn’t something I chose, and it is not something I am ashamed of.”

  • Doug Scott has been exploring and writing about the waterfalls of New Mexico for decades. Of special interest is that a new 80-foot high waterfall is being formed this year, for which Scott is documenting the formation and the fact that it will continue to grow for years to come. Scott will share photos and observations of these waterfalls in a slideshow and presentation 7 p.m. April 10 at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    There are hundreds of waterfalls in the Land of Enchantment, yet very few people know this. Attendees of Scott’s talks are always greatly inspired to become “Waterfall-lovers” and begin “Waterfalling” immediately.
    At this event, Scott will also sign all four of his outdoor books for those interested: “Taos Waterfalls,” “Taos Mountains,” “New Mexico Waterfalls” and “New Mexico Waterfall Handbook.”
    At age 20, Scott was the first commercial whitewater river outfitter in New Mexico in 1972. Scott was also the founder of Taos Mountain Outfitters in 1972. He has been a New Mexico guide and outdoor enthusiast since moving here in 1957.
    The program is free to attend, and no advance registration is required.

  • Among those I have taken to lunch over the years, I can now add a llama to my list. My dining companion, K-2, was one of six llamas that accompanied our small group on a recent day trek with in Northern New Mexico.
    A handsome blonde and statuesque creature with plenty of personality, K-2 was ever-alert and curious as we hiked the trails in the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Area of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. 
    I led my trusted wooly friend through the dense woods, over bridges and into the gentle creeks within this picturesque and unspoiled wilderness. With his leather padded, two-toed feet and natural agility, he walked with a self-possessed air, exuding confidence as he navigated the terrain without faltering, while carrying a load of gear.
    “Llamas are the perfect low-impact, high altitude pack animal,” said Stuart Wilde, owner and head wilderness guide of Wild Earth Llama Adventures. “They are sure-footed because they have the perfect ‘mountain moccasins’ — like mountain goats — and they have little impact on fragile wilderness trails. They exemplify the ‘leave no trace’ ethic we practice and teach out here.”